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In Alabama, Jill Biden details stimulus funding to fight child poverty.

BIRMINGHAM, Al. – When a group of senior West Wing officials recently met to discuss how to communicate to the public the details of a $ 1.9 trillion pandemic relief program , it didn’t take long for them to decide that First Lady Jill Biden needed to travel the country to promote one of her most ambitious provisions: a generous tax credit that could, at least temporarily, pull out millions children of poverty.

“His campaign nickname was ‘The Closer’,” said Anita Dunn, senior advisor to President Biden who was part of the planning.

On Friday, Dr Biden traveled to Birmingham, Alabama on his first trip highlighting the provision, telling a crowd at the YWCA: “This administration is going to make sure you have what you need to get through the storm.”

“In the past, you used to get $ 2,000 for a child tax credit,” Dr. Biden said. “This year, if you have children under the age of 6, you will receive $ 3,600. For older children, it will be $ 3,000. ”

According to a fact sheet released by Columbia University, the relief plan could cut child poverty in the United States in half. Among its provisions, the stimulus package includes a child tax credit to supplement the income of low-income families.

It is also expanding the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance program benefits by $ 3.5 billion, or about $ 28 more per person, according to the United States Department of Agriculture.

Dr Biden appeared with Rep. Terri Sewell, Democrat of Alabama, who told the crowd she was proud to be the only congressman from Alabama to vote for the US bailout.

“They wanted direct resources,” Sewell said of the state’s families, referring to the direct payments provided by the stimulus package.

Earlier on Friday, the first lady visited an early childhood development center and met with preschool students who will benefit from a $ 1 billion increase in funding for Head Start programs, the White House said. The programs provide early intervention education and support to students, many of whom are low-income.

The $ 1.52 trillion budget plan released by the Biden administration on Friday called Head Start a chronically underfunded program and called for $ 1.2 billion in additional funding, bringing the total to $ 11.9 billion. dollars.

Of the 45 million Americans who depend on the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance program, about 392,000 of them are children living in Alabama, according to data compiled by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, a foundation that promotes wellness. children. And according to Alabama Possible, a nonprofit organization that tracks poverty rates, about 256,000 children live below the federal poverty line. (An earlier version of this article misstated the total number of people who rely on SNAP across the country compared to Alabama.)

“It is important to her that people who have felt invisible in the past or disconnected from government are welcome, included and accepted by this administration,” said Elizabeth Alexander, the first lady’s director of communications.

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House votes to avoid deep cuts to medicare to pay for $ 1.9 trillion stimulus package

WASHINGTON – The House voted on Friday to avoid cuts estimated at $ 36 billion in medicare next year and tens of billions more in farm subsidies and other social protection programs, in order to ‘Avoid deep spending cuts that would otherwise be made for A $ 1.9 trillion stimulus bill was passed last week.

The action, opposed by the vast majority of Republicans, would effectively exempt President Biden’s pandemic assistance program from a deficit reduction law that requires all spending to be offset by automatic and widespread cuts by some. government programs. It was passed by a vote of 246 to 175, with 29 Republicans joining Democrats in backing it.

In adopting the virus aid plan, Democrats used a fast-track budget process to overtake Republican opposition, arguing that urgent needs brought on by the pandemic outweighed concerns about rising national debt. But the maneuver meant Congress had to act separately to prevent the automatic cuts, which would take effect in January if lawmakers failed to act.

Democrats remained convinced that even if they opposed the stimulus package, Republican senators would end up supporting legislation to avoid cutting Medicare, farm subsidies, and block grants to social services to pay them off. . But the debate provided an opportunity for members of both sides to present their dueling arguments over government spending priorities after the enactment of one of the most expansive federal bailouts in modern times.

In an address to the House, Representative John Yarmuth of Kentucky, chairman of the Budget Committee, described the bill as “a cowardly end that we must tie up before our work is done.” He argued that the legislation would put the stimulus bill on a par with previous pandemic relief bills passed under the Trump administration. All of these bills were approved by an overwhelming bipartisan majority and waived the demand for corresponding spending cuts.

Voting Margin indicated waiver legislation could be negotiated later in the year, as lawmakers approach a deadline to address the debt ceiling and dozen bills. spending necessary to maintain government funding. It’s unclear when the measure will be taken in the Senate, where 10 Republicans are expected to join Democrats for it to become law. Similar waivers have been repeatedly approved regardless of the party.

The politically unpopular specter of drastic cuts to health insurance during a pandemic is likely to prompt lawmakers to strike a deal before the end of the year.

“Very few of them would actually want the pay-go escrow to strike,” said Marc Goldwein, senior vice chairman of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, a group that urges budget cuts. Mr Goldwein predicted that Republicans would likely end up voting for a waiver, as part of a larger deal. “They can try to get something in return.”

The stimulus payout debate stems from a 2010 law known as the PAYG Act, which requires certain deficit spending to be automatically offset by cuts to federal programs. Typically, when Congress wanted to spend big, it also voted to ignore this rule. But because the recent pandemic relief bill was passed using a special budget process called reconciliation, a waiver could not be included.

The Congressional Progressive Caucus has called for the law to be removed to avoid automatic cuts.

Frequently asked questions about the new Stimulus package

Stimulus payments would be $ 1,400 for most recipients. Eligible people would also receive an identical payment for each of their children. To qualify for the full $ 1,400, a single person would need an adjusted gross income of $ 75,000 or less. For heads of households, the adjusted gross income should be $ 112,500 or less, and for married couples reporting jointly, this figure should be $ 150,000 or less. To be eligible for payment, a person must have a social security number. Read more.

Buying insurance through the government program known as COBRA would temporarily become much cheaper. COBRA, for the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act, generally allows a person who loses a job to purchase coverage through the former employer. But it’s expensive: under normal circumstances, a person may have to pay at least 102% of the cost of the premium. Under the relief bill, the government would pay the full COBRA premium from April 1 to September 30. A person who qualified for new employer-based health insurance elsewhere before September 30 would lose their eligibility for coverage at no cost. And someone who voluntarily quit their job would not be eligible either. Read more

This credit, which helps working families offset child care costs for children under 13 and other dependents, would be significantly expanded for just one year. More people would be eligible and many beneficiaries would benefit from a longer break. The bill would also make the credit fully refundable, meaning you could collect the money as a refund even if your tax bill was zero. “This will be helpful for people at the bottom of the ladder,” said Mark Luscombe, senior federal tax analyst at Wolters Kluwer Tax & Accounting. Read more.

There would be a big one for people already in debt. You would not have to pay income tax on the forgiven debt if you qualify for forgiveness or loan cancellation – for example, if you followed an income-based repayment plan during the number years required, if your school defrauded you, or if Congress or the President pays off $ 10,000 in debt for a large number of people. This would be the case for the debt canceled between January 1, 2021 and the end of 2025. Find out more.

The bill would provide billions of dollars in rent assistance and utilities to people in difficulty and at risk of eviction from their homes. About $ 27 billion would go to emergency housing assistance. The vast majority of it would replenish the so-called coronavirus relief fund, created by the CARES Act and distributed by state, local and tribal governments, according to the National Low Income Housing Coalition. This is in addition to the $ 25 billion in assistance provided by the relief plan adopted in December. To receive financial assistance – which could be used for rent, utilities, and other housing expenses – households would have to meet several conditions. Household income cannot exceed 80% of the area’s median income, at least one member of the household must be at risk of homelessness or housing instability, and individuals should be entitled to unemployment benefits or have experienced financial hardship (directly or indirectly) due to pandemic. The assistance could be provided for up to 18 months, according to the National Coalition for Low Income Housing. Low-income families who have been unemployed for three months or more would receive priority assistance. Read more.

The Congressional Budget Office, in a letter to Representative Kevin McCarthy of California, the minority leader, estimated that without the waiver enacted before the end of the calendar year, $ 36 billion would be cut from Medicare spending – 4 percentage points – in 2022 alone and billions more from dozens of other federal programs. Many mandatory spending programs could be postponed altogether, including Block Grants for Social Services, a Department of Justice program that provides assistance to victims of crime, and the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund.

Waiver bills of this type were usually passed on time to avoid major cuts. In 2017, after Republicans passed their $ 1.5 trillion tax cut, also using the budget reconciliation process, many Democrats voted to prevent automatic spending cuts on a project. end-of-year financing law.

“We have to work together, as we did for you when you gave tax cuts to the wealthiest Americans,” Illinois Democratic Representative Jan Schakowsky said in a comment to Republicans.

Republican lawmakers criticized Democrats for creating their own problem, arguing that there would be no need for a separate vote to avoid the cuts if the stimulus package had been bipartisan.

“We are here today because Democrats want to ‘solve’ one of the many problems caused by President Biden’s $ 1.9 trillion bailout bill,” said Rep. Jason Smith of Missouri, the main Republican on the budget committee. “They want to do it by simply wiping $ 1.9 trillion in spending off the nation’s books – pretending that $ 1.9 trillion in spending won’t happen.”

The Conservatives see the confrontation as an opportunity to criticize the Democrats’ overspending.

“I think it would be irresponsible not to do something about the level of overspending,” said Matthew Dickerson, director of the Grover M. Hermann Center for the Federal Budget at the Heritage Foundation. He said Republicans should use the impending cuts as leverage to pressure Democrats to agree to new measures to cut federal spending.

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What’s in the Federal Stimulus for Californians?

But officials stressed that the surplus was mostly already recorded, due to various state-funded relief programs.

And for Californians, the economic suffering will be long lasting – and federal help is needed.

“Don’t equate where we are based on income with where we are based on the economy,” said HD Palmer, deputy director of the state’s Department of Finance. “It will take us at least two years, if not more, for us to return to pre-pandemic employment levels.”

[Democrats see the passage of the popular stimulus as a major political opportunity.]

California lost a record 1.6 million jobs and, although the state government fared better than expected, cities faced serious deficits, thanks to the tax structure of the ‘State, as my colleague Vindu Goel wrote recently.

And, of course, California has by far the most residents of any state, which means Californians will receive a lot of direct aid overall.

Overall, the Department of Finance estimated that California would receive more than $ 150 billion, including money that would go to states and local governments, as well as directly to families, businesses and others. entities.

Here’s a look at where some of that money is intended to go:

  • 40 billion dollars: That is how much, collectively, Californians are expected to receive the stimulus payments of $ 1,400. (They are already being deposited.)

  • $ 30 billion: This is what Californians should receive in addition to UI benefits.

  • $ 16 billion: This is the amount that should be distributed among city and county governments to help make up for lost local tax revenue during the pandemic. And that’s what pays for essential services like law enforcement and firefighters. The money can also be used for water, sewer and broadband infrastructure projects.

  • $ 15.9 billion: This is what is expected of California elementary schools to help them reopen safely, including purchasing protective gear, upgrading buildings, increasing transportation capacity and reducing class sizes.

  • $ 5 billion: This is what California colleges could go to.

  • $ 4 billion: This is what California transit agencies should receive, which have been faced with doomsday scenarios.

  • $ 3.9 billion: That’s how much of the $ 40 billion the bill sets aside for total child care is expected to arrive in California.

  • $ 3.8 billion: This is roughly the total amount that should be spent on emergency housing assistance, as well as utility payments, food aid and other safety net programs in addition to unemployment insurance.

  • $ 550 million: The full federal bill includes $ 10 billion for capital projects, or large investments that will help facilitate labor, education, and public health surveillance. Each state is expected to receive $ 100 million, plus additional funds on a population-based formula.

  • $ 300 million: That’s what the state should be getting to help scale up immunization efforts. And this is in addition to the FEMA mass vaccination sites that are already functioning.

[Read more about how the full federal bill is divided up.]


  • California prosecutors sued Brookdale Senior Living, the nation’s largest chain of senior communities, accusing the company of manipulating the federal government’s nursing home rating system. [The New York Times]

  • Gov. Gavin Newsom enlisted a list of progressive stars – including Stacey Abrams, Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders – to fight the recall effort. [The New York Times]

Here is what you need to know the desire to oust Mr. Newsom from the office.

  • In an interview with The Times, Senator Alex Padilla, the Democrat who has been nominated to take the seat of Vice President Kamala Harris, has pushed for citizenship for five million unauthorized immigrants who are essential workers. [The New York Times]

Learn more about how the virus hit Pacoima, The hometown of Mr. Padilla.

  • Millions of Californians are newly eligible for coronavirus vaccines, including transit workers, commercial airline workers, federal immigration detention center workers, and the homeless. [CalMatters]

  • According to infection data obtained by a legal transparency website, hundreds of cases of the virus were reported at Tesla’s Bay Area plant after Elon Musk reopened in May. [Washington Post]

  • Three people were killed and six others were injured when hit by a car in an underground passage under the campus of San Diego City College. [The New York Times]

  • California could issue guidelines on microplastics in drinking water, although it is not known how dangerous they are. [CalMatters]

  • After a viral video shown group of Uber passengers in San Francisco coughing on driver and ripping off his mask, two of the horsemen were arrested. [The New York Times]

  • Disneyland temporarily suspends perks like FastPasses and Magic Overtime when parks reopen, citing complications from the virus. [The Orange County Register]

  • According to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, California has the second highest life expectancy for its population among the states, behind Hawaii. [CBS]


However, the Academy remains predominantly white and male. It remains to be seen how the April 25 ceremony will approach a year defined in large part by protests against racism.

The Grammys, on the other hand, ended up being an enjoyable and thoughtful spectacle on Sunday night; the performances were the closest we could get to a concert or an arena festival with our favorite big artists. And as my colleagues wrote, the outdoor setting near the Staples Center in downtown Los Angeles was a new solution to the pandemic.

Perhaps the Oscars, which are set to premiere from downtown Union Station, as well as the usual Dolby Theater in Hollywood, will get a similar revamp.

In any case, the event will not significantly disrupt transit service, officials said.


California Today goes live at 6:30 a.m. PT on weekdays. Tell us what you want to see: CAtoday@nytimes.com. Have you been forwarded this email? Sign up for California Today here and read each edition online here.

Jill Cowan grew up in Orange County, graduated from UC Berkeley, and has reported statewide, including the Bay Area, Bakersfield and Los Angeles – but she always wants to see more. Follow here or on Twitter.

California Today is edited by Julie Bloom, who grew up in Los Angeles and graduated from UC Berkeley.

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Will Republicans pay a price for opposing the stimulus?

Others seemed much more focused on Dr. Seuss and Mr. Potato Head, a culture war bait that ignites their conservative base. Representative Kevin McCarthy, the House Minority Leader, even brought the matter to the House. “First they ban Dr Seuss, and now they want to tell us what to say,” he said during a debate on a Democratic voting rights bill. (It’s the company that oversees the author’s estate, not the Democrats, that recently chose to stop publishing many of his works. And the Republicans’ focus on Dr. Seuss has brought some benefit. Economical: over 1.2 million copies of author children’s stories sold in the first week of March – more than four times the previous week.)

The Republicans’ predicament is simple: People love to make money, especially when they are in trouble, and this bill will work. About 90% of U.S. households will be eligible for stimulus checks. More than 93% of children – 69 million – will receive what is essentially a guaranteed income for families. Even those who do not receive payment will benefit from new funding for the reopening of schools and the distribution of vaccines.

Former President Donald J. Trump taught Republican voters to love this kind of government spending by championing stimulus measures even bigger than this bill. This makes it difficult for the GOP lawmakers who have supported these measures to argue against the cost of this legislation, without facing accusations of hypocrisy or possible repelling from parts of their base.

To change public opinion, Republicans will have to make do with a clear argument against the legislation and find the party discipline to lead it. To that end, they will closely monitor how the money is distributed, hoping to find examples of waste or fraud that they can highlight to undermine Mr. Biden’s political agenda. One area of ​​discontent is aid to state and local governments, which is far less polled among Republicans than Democrats. But it won’t be easy: Republicans are already struggling to overcome deep divisions within their ranks.

Mr Biden, well aware of the potential pitfalls, wants to make sure Americans understand the benefits of this bill – and give it credit for it. His speech on Thursday evening marked the start of a government campaign to promote the legislation across the country. It’s a strategy to avoid the struggles of former President Barack Obama, who some Democrats say was not aggressive enough in selling his 2009 stimulus package to voters.

The situation is not exactly the same: Unlike Mr. Obama, who has faced the challenge of a slow recovery, Mr. Biden is likely to benefit from a rapidly expanding economy, with forecasters predicting that growth will continue to grow. ‘will accelerate in the coming months as more and more Americans. to get vaccinated. He is also starting his campaign with more goodwill. Biden’s legislation is about 20 percentage points more popular than the 2009 bill immediately after its passage.

Yet the 2009 stimulus package provides an instructive example of how quickly public opinion can change. No House Republican voted for the $ 787 billion package and only three moderate Republicans in the Senate backed it, although nearly two in three Americans supported the bill.

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Video: Biden celebrates passage of Covid-19 relief bill

TimesVideoBiden Celebrates Passage of Covid-19 Relief Bill At an event in the Rose Garden on Friday, President Biden celebrated passage of the $ 1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill which will help revive the economy stunned by the pandemic.

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How Democrats hope to capitalize on the stimulus

President Biden yesterday signed his $ 1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill, a move that will send $ 1,400 stimulus checks to many Americans, bolster a wide range of social programs and step up investment in the distribution of vaccines. A few hours later, he went on national television to extol the feat. And this afternoon, he celebrated it in a ceremony at the rose garden, joined by Democratic leaders in Congress.

“It changes the paradigm,” Biden said today, speaking about the plan’s provisions to support low and middle class workers. “For the first time in a long time, this bill puts the workers of this country first.

The bill passed without a Republican vote, depriving the Biden administration of the ability to present it as a bipartisan effort – but also denying the GOP the chance to reap its fruits in the realm of public opinion, if the legislation remains as popular as it is. right now, according to polls.

Biden plans to travel the country in the next few days to get the message across to Americans that the legislation is not only providing the relief needed by families and businesses – but also that Democrats have kept a key election promise. Will it resonate? After the 2022 midterm elections, will voters remember a law passed a year and a half earlier?

To understand how politics interacts with politics, I caught up with Jonathan martin, a national political correspondent, to talk about how Democrats plan to put this legislative victory to their advantage at the polls next year.

Republican lawmakers in Washington were united in their opposition to the relief program. But some, like Senator Roger Wicker of Mississippi, are already praising some of the programs funded by the bill. Do any of these GOP lawmakers regret their opposition?

The popularity of the package is not lost on Republicans in Congress. Some party members believe it will become less appealing once voters realize how limited funding is for direct Covid relief, but most GOP lawmakers appear keen to change the subject due to the growing number. migrants at the southern border.

It’s no coincidence that Republican House Leader Kevin McCarthy is going there on Monday (and has no plans to host any events in opposition to the stimulus).

Biden spoke of learning the lessons of 2009, when then-President Barack Obama signed a nearly $ 1 trillion stimulus bill but withstood a “victory lap.” Democrats ended up suffering big losses midway through 2010. How does Biden seek to avoid a similar fate?

With a lot of events! I’m half kidding.

The White House is determined to flood the area, as the saying goes, and send all kinds of personalities, from first and second families to cabinet secretaries, to promote the bill.

But the administration is also hoping that the direct impact – namely checks in the mail – will make this measure much more tangible and therefore politically popular than the 2009 bill.

If Democrats were able to keep their razor-thin majorities in Congress, it would go against history – which tells us that a new presidential party almost never manages to win in a mid-election. mandate. Looking at the map in 2022, how good do Democrats think their chances of challenging this story are?

Right now they are optimistic because they are united – certainly by democratic standards! –and Republicans have obvious challenges with former President Donald Trump, who is still beloved by their main base but who is deeply unpopular with the electorate at large.

But Democratic leaders know how often there is backlash against the ruling party, and they also know how tight their margins are in both houses of Congress. Even the slightest pro-Republican breeze next year will raise them to a majority.

Frequently asked questions about the new Stimulus package

Stimulus payments would be $ 1,400 for most recipients. Eligible people would also receive an identical payment for each of their children. To qualify for the full $ 1,400, a single person would need an adjusted gross income of $ 75,000 or less. For heads of household, the adjusted gross income should be $ 112,500 or less, and for married couples reporting jointly, this figure should be $ 150,000 or less. To be eligible for payment, a person must have a social security number. Read more.

Buying insurance through the government program known as COBRA would temporarily become much cheaper. COBRA, for the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act, generally allows a person who loses a job to purchase coverage through the former employer. But it’s expensive: under normal circumstances, a person may have to pay at least 102% of the cost of the premium. Under the relief bill, the government would pay the full COBRA premium from April 1 to September 30. A person who qualified for new employer-based health insurance elsewhere before September 30 would lose their eligibility for coverage at no cost. And someone who voluntarily quit their job would not be eligible either. Read more

This credit, which helps working families offset child care costs for children under 13 and other dependents, would be significantly expanded for just one year. More people would be eligible and many beneficiaries would benefit from a greater break. The bill would also make the credit fully refundable, meaning you could collect the money as a refund even if your tax bill was zero. “This will be helpful for people at the bottom of the ladder,” said Mark Luscombe, senior federal tax analyst at Wolters Kluwer Tax & Accounting. Read more.

There would be a big one for people already in debt. You would not have to pay income tax on the forgiven debt if you were eligible for forgiveness or loan cancellation – for example, if you followed an income-based repayment plan during the number years required, if your school defrauded you, or if Congress or the President pays off $ 10,000 in debt for a large number of people. This would be the case for the debt canceled between January 1, 2021 and the end of 2025. Find out more.

The bill would provide billions of dollars in rent assistance and utilities to people in difficulty and in danger of being evicted from their homes. About $ 27 billion would go to emergency housing assistance. The vast majority of it would replenish the so-called coronavirus relief fund, created by the CARES Act and distributed by state, local and tribal governments, according to the National Low Income Housing Coalition. This is in addition to the $ 25 billion in assistance provided by the relief plan adopted in December. To receive financial assistance – which could be used for rent, utilities, and other housing expenses – households would have to meet several conditions. Household income cannot exceed 80% of the area’s median income, at least one member of the household must be at risk of homelessness or housing instability, and individuals should be entitled to unemployment benefits or have experienced financial hardship (directly or indirectly) due to the pandemic. The assistance could be provided for up to 18 months, according to the National Coalition for Low-Income Housing. Low-income families who have been unemployed for three months or more would receive priority assistance. Read more.

In his speech last night, Biden said the vaccine rollout was “really a national effort, just like we saw in World War II.” After a presidential campaign centered on calls for unity and reconciliation, does Biden see this bill – which is supported by around seven in 10 Americans, according to polls – as an opportunity to look back on an era of l American history before political polarization set in so deeply?

This is certainly how he campaigned, and in the early days of his administration he seemed interested in pursuing bipartisanship. But when Senate Republicans came to him with a counter-offer on the stimulus that was about a third of the $ 1.9 trillion he had in mind, he preferred speed and scale to two-party politics.

The big question, now that Congress appears to be moving towards infrastructure, a question historically that transcends party lines, is whether Biden will make a real shift to true two-party politics and push Congress Democrats to put together a package that includes Republicans.


New York Times Podcasts

In today’s episode, Ezra spoke with Dr. Ashish Jha, physician, senior health policy researcher and dean of Brown University School of Public Health.

Dr Jha is helping us guide us through the coming months of the pandemic, to help us see what he sees. Make no mistake: it is not over yet. But in America, things are going to feel very, very different 45 days from now, for reasons he explains. Then comes another question: How do we ensure that the global end of this crisis comes soon after? You can listen here.

On Politics is also available as a newsletter. register here to have it delivered to your inbox.

Do you think we are missing something? Do you want to see more? We would love to hear from you. Write to us at onpolitics@nytimes.com.

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Which families will receive the most money from the stimulus bill?

The Covid-19 relief legislation signed by President Biden on Thursday includes a larger increase in direct assistance to families than in any other pandemic relief bill passed so far – an average of $ 6,660 for households with children, according to a non-partisan tax policy analysis. Center.

For 500,000 poor families with two or more children, assistance of about $ 10,000 will more than double their annual income. According to some estimates, the bill could cut child poverty in half this year.

The bill does this primarily in two ways: a significant increase in stimulus payments per child and a larger child tax credit that will particularly benefit low-income families.

Upcoming stimulus checks are bigger for adults than for the first two rounds – $ 1,400 per adult, compared to $ 1,200 per adult in a bill passed in March 2020 and $ 600 per adult in December. The same income thresholds apply to receive the full amount: $ 75,000 for singles, $ 112,500 for heads of household, and $ 150,000 for married couples, although the check amounts disappear much faster for those who are married. employees above these levels.

The largest increase concerns children and other dependents. In the first two rounds, taxpayers received $ 500, then $ 600 for each dependent child. This round includes $ 1,400 for each dependent child and dependent adult, which includes college students.

And unlike previous rounds of stimulus, the child tax credit has been increased. It is now worth $ 3,600 per child under 5 and $ 3,000 per older child, starting at $ 2,000 per child. Low-income families will benefit the most, as they will now be entitled to the full amount, even if their tax liability is very low.

Previously, parents could deduct the credit of $ 2,000 per child from their tax payable. If they didn’t pay that much tax, they could qualify for a refundable credit of up to $ 1,400. Now all parents will receive the full amount, with half of the credit value being issued in advance from July.

The income thresholds for the full child tax credit are the same as for the stimulus payments. The credits are eliminated entirely for unmarried taxpayers earning $ 240,000 or more and for married couples earning $ 440,000.

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A GOP senator tweets with approval on part of the stimulus bill, without mentioning one detail: his “no” vote.

Before the House finally approves a $ 1.9 trillion stimulus package on Wednesday without any Republican backing, Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned Republicans of their opposition to the measure, saying, “It’s typical that they vote no and take the dough. “

As if to make his point, Senator Roger Wicker, Republican of Mississippi, tweeted with approval Within hours of the bill’s passage, the $ 28.6 billion included for “targeted aid” for restaurants. His message did not mention that he had voted no.

“I will not vote for $ 1.9 trillion just because it contains some good provisions,” he later told reporters.

Mr Wicker’s post received an unwelcome reception on Twitter, sparking thousands of responses, many of them pointing out that he had voted against the measure, known as the US bailout.

Representative Debbie Dingell, Democrat of Michigan, wrote in his own tweet that she had “worked with restaurants in my neighborhood for almost a year to get the help they desperately needed,” adding, “Republican senators including @SenatorWicker have rejected this critical help.”

“Too many people have closed and many more are suffering,” she said of the restaurants. “I’m glad we helped them today despite his objections.

Another tweet, from an account given by Senate Democrats, recalled how a certain vote was cast: “The US bailout will benefit American families and small businesses – and Senator Wicker voted NO.”

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TimesVideoWatch Live: House to vote on stimulus bill Lawmakers are expected to give final approval to President Biden’s massive, nearly $ 1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package.

TimesVideoWatch Live: House to vote on stimulus bill Lawmakers are expected to give final approval to President Biden’s massive, nearly $ 1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package.

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In the stimulus bill, a political revolution in helping children

Wellness critics warn the country is retreating from success. Child poverty hit a new low before the pandemic, and opponents say a child allowance could reverse this trend by reducing incentives to work. About 10 million children are poor according to a government definition that varies according to family size and local cost of living. (A typical family of four with an income of less than about $ 28,000 is considered poor.)

“Why are Republicans sleeping on the switch?” wrote Mickey Kaus, whose anti-welfare writings influenced debate in the 1990s. He urged Republicans to run ads in conservative states with Democratic senators, attacking them for their support for “a new welfare wage “.

Under Mr Biden’s plan, an unemployed mother with three young children could receive $ 10,800 a year, plus food stamps and Medicaid – too little to thrive but enough, critics fear, to erode a commitment to work and marriage. Scott Winship of the conservative American Enterprise Institute wrote that the new benefit creates “a very real risk of encouraging more single parents and more families without workers.”

But child allowance differs from traditional aid in ways that appeal to some on the right. Libertarians like that this frees parents to use the money as they please, unlike targeted aid like food stamps. Proponents of higher birth rates say a child allowance could help stop a decline in fertility. Social conservatives note that this benefits stay-at-home parents, who are bypassed by work-based programs like child care.

And proponents say it has fewer work disincentives than traditional aid, which declines rapidly as incomes rise. Under the Democrats’ plan, full benefits extend to single parents with income of $ 112,500 and couples of $ 150,000.

The clearance may increase as the program scan becomes clear. But Samuel Hammond, a supporter of child benefits at the center-right Niskanen Center, said aid policy had changed in ways that softened conservative resistance.

A quarter of a century ago, the debate centered on an urban underclass whose problems seemed to set them apart from a generally prosperous society. They were disproportionately black and Latino and predominantly represented by Democrats. Now, insecurity has moved up the economic ladder to a larger working class with similar issues, like underemployment, marriage breakdown, and drugs. Often white and rural, many voters Republicans hope to woo.