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Trump will step down with his lowest approval rating on record.

Over four years of scandals and investigations, President Trump has maintained an approval rating that has rarely budged from a 10-point band between 35 and 45 percent. Nothing he could say, do, or tweet seemed to drastically change public opinion about him.

But the events of January 6 – when a violent mob of President-incited Trump supporters stormed the Capitol – appear to have damaged it in his final days in office in a way that ultimately moved the needle. .

Mr Trump is expected to step down on Wednesday with an approval rating of 29%, the lowest in his presidency, according to a new poll from the Pew Research Center.

About 75% of the public said Mr. Trump was partly responsible for the violence and destruction on January 6, which put the lives of the vice president and members of Congress at risk and resulted in five deaths, the inquiry found. .

And his behavior since the election – a period in which he has repeatedly tried to challenge his loss, has relied on conspiracy theorists for advice, has encouraged supporters who do not consider the president-elect. Joseph R. Biden Jr. as legitimate and refused to concede – cost Mr. Trump’s support even to those who have loyally supported him so far.

According to Pew, the share of supporters who described his conduct as “poor” has doubled from 10% to 20% in the past two months.

Mr. Biden, on the other hand, benefited from the way he handled the transition period. About 64% of voters said they had a positive opinion of his conduct since the November election. The majority of voters said they also approved of his cabinet selections.

Mr Trump’s polls during his tenure have been surprisingly stagnant, despite the president’s regular eruptions. He was the only president in Gallup poll history to never gain the support of a majority of Americans during a single day in office. But he also clung to his enduring base, which seemed willing to ignore any behavior he did not approve of or any promises Mr. Trump never kept.

That group now appears to have dwindled, although Mr. Trump still has staunch supporters who believe in the conspiracy theories he promoted about voter fraud. About 34% of respondents said they believed Mr. Trump was “definitely” or “probably” the legitimate winner of the election.

Mr. Trump’s advisers have attempted to give him that base of loyal support, noting that there were “welcome home” events scheduled for his arrival in Florida on Wednesday. They also scheduled an optimistic dispatch on the morning of January 20 to commemorate his final departure from Washington as president, aboard Air Force One.

But whatever show of support he sees on his way out, he will deny the reality of his situation.

Not only did he make history as the first president to be impeached twice. But he appears to be on his way to leaving office with the lowest approval rating of any modern president.

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Toyota to pay record fine for decade of air quality law violations

Toyota Motor expected to pay $ 180 million for long-standing violations of the Clean Air Act, the U.S. attorney’s office in Manhattan said Thursday, the largest civil penalty ever imposed for a violation of federal emissions reporting requirements .

Between around 2005 and 2015, the global automaker consistently failed to report faults that interfered with the way its cars controlled tailpipe emissions, violating standards designed to protect public health and the environment from harmful air pollutants, according to a complaint filed in Manhattan.

Toyota officials and staff in Japan were aware of the practice but failed to stop it, and the automaker most likely sold millions of faulty vehicles, the prosecutor’s office said.

“Toyota has turned a blind eye to the non-compliance,” Audrey Strauss, the acting US lawyer, said in a statement. Toyota has agreed not to challenge the fine.

Eric Booth, a spokesperson for the automaker, said the company alerted authorities as soon as the breaches were revealed, and the delay in reporting “had a negligible impact on emissions, if any.”

“Nonetheless, we recognize that some of our reporting protocols did not meet our own high standards, and we are happy to have resolved this issue,” added Mr. Booth.

Toyota is the world’s second-largest automaker behind Volkswagen, and has built a reputation for clean technology on the back of its best-selling Prius gasoline-electric hybrid passenger cars. But the auto giant’s decision in 2019 to support the Trump administration’s rollback of tailpipe emissions standards – coupled with its relatively slow introduction of fully electric vehicles – has made it a target of criticism from the share of environmental groups.

Toyota’s newer model lineup has been heavy on gas-guzzling sport utility vehicles, which come with much higher price tags and have generated much higher profit margins. According to a recent Environmental Protection Agency report, Toyota vehicles have provided one of the worst fuel savings in the industry, leading to an overall worsening of mileage and pollution from passenger cars and trucks in the United States for the first time in five years.

Many automakers are now bracing for a likely push from the incoming Biden administration for a return to stricter exhaust emission rules, and have indicated they are determined to work with those responsible for administration.

“It’s appalling that automakers cheat on the pollution rules, but then want President Biden to negotiate with them over new clean car standards,” said Dan Becker, who leads the Safe Climate Transport campaign at the Center for Biological Diversity, an environmental group. “After reneging on their previous commitments, why should anyone trust the automakers?”

The auto industry has been plagued by emissions scandals in recent years. In 2017, Volkswagen pleaded guilty to conspiring to defraud the United States government after admitting that it had rigged its diesel-powered cars to meet air quality standards while being tested, even though the cars exceeded these standards in regular driving. Last year, Daimler, another German automaker, agreed to pay $ 2.2 billion to settle charges that Mercedes-Benz cars and vans sold in the United States were programmed to cheat on testing. emissions.

The car owners themselves have also been accused of tampering with their vehicles. A federal report this year concluded that owners and operators of more than half a million diesel pickup trucks have illegally disabled their vehicles’ emission control technology over the past decade, allowing excess emissions equivalent to 9 millions more trucks on the road.

Transportation, which remains heavily dependent on fossil fuels, accounts for the bulk of global warming emissions, ahead of emissions generated by the energy sector, manufacturing or agriculture. Scientists have long warned that cars and trucks around the world must ditch gasoline to avoid the worst effects of climate change.

Recent estimates have shown that transportation-related emissions in the United States fell by almost 15% in 2020, with millions of people stopped commuting to work and airlines canceling flights. But experts warn that emissions from cars and trucks will rebound unless policymakers take stronger action to keep emissions low.

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A world tour of a record year

2020 was effectively tied with 2016 for the warmest year on record, with global warming linked to greenhouse gas emissions showing no signs of slowing down.

Siberia and the Arctic were among the warmest regions. The heat fueled forest fires that pumped more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.

Temperatures in the Siberian city of Verkhoyansk reached a record high of 100 degrees Fahrenheit in June, more than 30 degrees above average.

The heat was also felt in Europe, which experienced the hottest year in its history and experienced searing heatwaves until September.

The surface cooling of the tropical Pacific Ocean, which began in the second half of the year, has hardly offset the heat elsewhere.

In central South America, warming and drought triggered forest fires that burned a quarter of the vast Pantanal wetland.

In the United States, the warming has been greatest in the northeast and southwest. The drought has spread to half of the country.


This analysis of global temperatures, carried out by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies at NASA and released on Thursday, found that 2020 was slightly warmer than 2016. But the difference was insignificant, said institute director Gavin Schmidt, in an interview.

“In fact, it’s a statistical equality,” he says.

Other analyzes released Thursday, one by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and another by Berkeley Earth, an independent research group in California, found that 2020 was slightly colder than 2016, just like the one released last week by the Copernicus Climate Change Service in Europe. But the difference was small enough that it was not statistically significant.

With the 2020 results, the past seven years have been the warmest since modern archiving began almost a century and a half ago, Dr Schmidt said.

“We’re now very, very clear on the underlying long-term trends,” he said. “We understand where they come from. This is because of the greenhouse gases pumped into the atmosphere.

The planet has warmed by more than 1 degree Celsius (about 2 degrees Fahrenheit) since the late 1800s, when the spread of industrialization resulted in increased emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. greenhouse, and the pace has accelerated in recent decades. Since 1980, warming has averaged about 0.18 degrees Celsius (about 0.32 degrees Fahrenheit) per decade.

But the numbers are only a small part of the story. As climatologists predicted, the world is seeing an increase in heat waves, storms and other extreme weather conditions as the planet warms, and disasters such as droughts, floods and wildfires. that result. The past year has offered no respite, with record fires in Australia and California, and severe drought in central South America and the American Southwest.

Some climatologists had thought that the arrival of cooler sea surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean – part of the recurring global climate phenomenon called La Niña – would squeeze temperatures this year. It is difficult to quantify the influence of La Niña, but it is clear that any effect has been overshadowed by the rise in temperature linked to emissions.

La Niña only appeared in September and grew stronger a few months later. La Niña’s climate impact tends to peak several months after the waters of the Pacific have reached their coldest point, so it may have more cooling effect in 2021.

When La Niña is factored in, “you don’t expect a banner year” in 2021, Dr Schmidt said. “But another year in the top five, and one that is clearly part of a series of very hot years that we have had,” he added.

Dr Schmidt said his team and others have studied the effects of the coronavirus pandemic on temperatures in 2020. Lockdown orders and the economic downturn have reduced greenhouse gas emissions by about 10% in the United States only, according to a recent report.

Such a reduction does not have an immediate effect on temperatures, Dr Schmidt said, and emissions will likely rise again as the pandemic subsides and the global economy returns to normal.

The biggest short-term effect, he said, could be the reduction of some transport-related pollution, including exhaust emissions of nitrogen oxides, as driving has declined during the pandemic.

Nitrogen oxides form aerosols in the atmosphere that reflect some of the sun’s rays, which would otherwise strike the surface and be re-emitted as heat. Even a slight reduction in these aerosols would allow more sunlight to reach the surface, generating more heat that would be trapped in the atmosphere by greenhouse gases.

Dr Schmidt said efforts were underway to quantify the effect over the past year. “The numbers aren’t important,” he said, but they may have played a role in making 2020 a banner year.

“The warming associated with aerosol reduction can be history,” he said.

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Democrats in Georgia make record record

ATLANTA – Reverend Raphael G. Warnock and Jon Ossoff, the Democratic challengers in the second round of the Senate in Georgia, have each raised more than $ 100 million since October – huge sums that have far exceeded their Republican opponents and highlighted Democrats’ confidence after the party’s recent gains in the state and their hopes of conquering the Senate.

The contests have drawn a wave of attention and investment from outside Georgia, given the stakes, and the campaign only intensified in the final weeks before the second round, which is scheduled for 5 January.

Senator David Perdue, one of the Republican incumbents, raised $ 68 million between Oct. 15 and Dec. 16, according to reports from the Federal Election Commission released Thursday. Senator Kelly Loeffler, the other Republican, raised nearly $ 64 million during that time.

Mr Ossoff, who is running against Mr Perdue, became the best-funded Senate candidate in history after raising $ 106.7 million, according to the documents filed, and Mr Warnock, who is challenging Ms Loeffler, raised $ 103.3 million.

The Democrats’ transport was fueled largely by a wave of small donations collected across the country, according to the documents filed, with nearly half of the funds coming from people who gave less than $ 200.

For Mr. Perdue and Ms. Loeffler, the smallest donations were less than 30 percent of what they raised.

Mr. Ossoff, who runs a media production company, spent $ 93.5 million during that time and had $ 17.4 million in cash, and Mr. Warnock, the pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church at Atlanta spent $ 86.1 million and had $ 22.7 million in cash on hand. Mr. Perdue spent $ 57.8 million and had $ 16 million in cash, and Ms. Loeffler spent $ 48.6 million and had $ 21.2 million in cash.

Ms Loeffler, one of the wealthiest members of the Senate, was the only candidate to donate to her own campaign, donating $ 333,200 – far less than the $ 23 million of her own money she spent on the campaign. general election race.

The figures in the documents only affirm a level of investment that has been clearly visible to Georgian voters for months. Campaign ads fill virtually every commercial break on television and radio. The spending even crossed state lines, as candidates and outside groups bought time in markets like Jacksonville, Fla., And Chattanooga, Tennessee, to reach Georgian voters living nearby.

The amounts contributed by the two Democrats exceeded the $ 57 million raised by Jaime Harrison during his campaign in South Carolina against Republican Senator Lindsey Graham, which had been the highest quarterly fundraising total for any candidate for the Senate of United States History. Still, the race ended up being a disappointment for Democrats, demonstrating that record hits don’t necessarily translate into electoral success.

But in Georgia, Democrats have been backed by a string of recent successes in a state that until recently was reliably Republican. President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. was the first Democratic presidential candidate to win in Georgia since 1992.

Mr. Biden and President Trump have visited to campaign for their party’s candidates. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris and Ivanka Trump, the president’s eldest daughter, both made campaign stops in Georgia last week.

Democrats have focused on the stock transactions their opponents made during their tenure in the Senate and on their support for Mr. Trump in his efforts to reverse his loss in Georgia.

Republicans have largely focused on Mr Warnock, with Loeffler calling him a “radical liberal” more than a dozen times in a recent televised debate. His campaign also circulated selected quotes from his more than two decades of sermons, including an example where he said “no one can serve God and the host,” a theme that has its roots in biblical passages.

A coalition of African-American pastors issued an open letter to Ms Loeffler last week condemning her campaign for what they saw as an attack on the black church. Political observers in Georgia have also argued that it damaged the relationship Republicans had with Ebenezer, the congregation that was once headed by Reverend Martin Luther King Jr.

Yet in the Christmas messages, a day for the most part without a campaign, Ms Loeffler and Mr Warnock made a similar note, describing the turbulence of the past year and envisioning a turn for the better.

“With Christmas comes a new light and new hope,” Ms. Loeffler said in a video she posted to social media.

“I know too many people are heartbroken tonight,” Mr. Warnock said in his own Twitter post, “and the holidays don’t seem to make things any better. It’s been dark for a long time, and it may be Christmas never come. But fear not. Dawn is coming. Good news and hope are on the horizon. “

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A record week for the virus, in numbers

The state of the virus this week

Mitch smith

Mitch smithCoronavirus Reports

Lucy Hewett for The New York Times

The national death toll has skyrocketed 300,000 this week, and there are few signs that the pace will slow down anytime soon. California, Illinois, Pennsylvania and Texas all reported more than 1,000 deaths last week.

In obituaries, families ask others to take the virus seriously

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‘Numb’ and ‘Heartbroken’, US faces record virus deaths

DALLAS – Lillian Blancas was a fighter, proud immigrant daughter, the first generation in her family to attend college, and a lawyer in El Paso who was on the cusp of fulfilling her dream of becoming a judge.

Instead, Ms Blancas, 47, died alone in her hospital room this week, just ahead of a run-off election on Saturday in which she was the favorite, part of a grim cascade of deceased Americans from the coronavirus as it raged. control. More than 3,000 deaths were reported Wednesday for the first time since the start of the pandemic.

“We are completely devastated. Sorry. We can’t find a reason, ”said her sister, Gabriela Tiemann, who remembers looking through the glass doors to Ms Blancas’ hospital room, wishing she could stroke her hair one last time.

Credit…via the Blancas family

The new daily death record – 3,055 people who blew birthday candles, made mistakes, laughed and cried before succumbing to the virus – far exceeded the spring peak of 2,752 deaths on April 15 and represented a stunning incarnation the results of the pandemic. In a single day, the numb and divided country lost more Americans to the coronavirus than were killed in the September 11 terrorist attacks or the Pearl Harbor attack.

Catherine Troisi, an infectious disease epidemiologist at the UTHealth School of Public Health in Houston, said she had cried looking at the faces of coronavirus victims on “PBS NewsHour” and expected the death toll to rise. is accelerating, in part because current numbers probably don’t reflect. infections of Thanksgiving gatherings.

“The worst is yet to come in the next week or two or three,” she said. “What happens after that will depend on our current behavior.”

The most recent deaths come as the country registers more new cases and hospitalizations than ever. More than 290,000 people have died in the United States during the pandemic.

With a current average of over 2,200 deaths per day, Covid-19 is, at least for now, surpassing heart disease and cancer as the main killer in the United States. About 1,800 people die on average each day from heart disease and 1,640 from cancer, according to data compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for 2018, the latest comprehensive data available.

For yet another week, the virus claimed the lives of young and old, healthy and sick, eminent and ordinary people best known to those who loved them.

Jamie Neff, 50, of New Castle, Pa., Was a cook who perfectly tinkered with his recipes and loved to cheer on the Pittsburgh Steelers, according to his obituary.

Richard Hinch, 71, a Republican and the new president of New Hampshire State House, died on Wednesday, just a week after being sworn in.

And then there was Ms Blancas, whose story touched a nerve in the tight border town that has been devastated by a wave of coronavirus deaths.

Ms Blancas, who had no known underlying health issues, first became ill with mild symptoms at the end of October, as cases rose sharply in El Paso. On November 3, the night she got enough votes for the second round, she was exhausted in bed. And the following week, she was hospitalized with major respiratory problems.

She never left the hospital.

Born and raised in El Paso, Ms Blancas has been described as a force of nature, fierce and without excuse, but with an infectious, snorting laugh that brightened up any room. A former teacher, she worked as a public prosecutor and deputy public defender before running for the post of municipal judge.

“It was a titanium,” said Kaitlyn Urenda-Culpepper, who was in Ms. Blancas’ seventh-grade science class years ago. “She created a space for me to know that at any age or at any stage of life, you can be whatever you want.

Now Ms Blancas can still win her election even as her family plans her funeral.

Ms Blancas, who won around 40% of the vote in November, the tallest candidate among all candidates, is still on the ballot for Saturday’s run-off election. Her opponent, Enrique Alonso Holguin, a private defense attorney and associate judge for the city of El Paso, also considered Ms. Blancas a friend and told the El Paso Times he was shocked by the news. “I’m still numb,” he says. “I’m just very, very sad right now.”

If Ms Blancas wins, El Paso city council would vote to nominate a candidate.

Loss of a number at the center of a contested election reflects the virus’s high toll in El Paso, a city of 680,000 that has become the face of a reverberating viral crisis in West Texas and across the country . The city had to expand its supply of mobile morgues and deploy people from the county jail to help transport the dead. At one point in November, El Paso Matters, a nonprofit newsroom, estimated that the city was averaging one coronavirus death per hour.

“There aren’t enough of us for everyone,” said Linda Azani, deputy director of Perches funeral homes, where she said about 70% of death calls are linked to the coronavirus.

“Not enough directors to see the families,” she said. “Not enough facilities to have a funeral. Not enough chapels.

But nowhere is the virus outbreak isolated. Government officials and funeral homes across the country are sounding the alarm bells.

Barbara Ferrer, the veteran Los Angeles County public health director, who has been giving briefings since the early days of the pandemic, choked this week as she spoke of the cumulative death toll in her area.

“The most terrible truth is that over 8,000 people – sorry – over 8,000 people who were beloved family members are not coming back,” she said, her voice shaking in a display window. emotion which was all the more poignant against the habit. charts and data points from health briefings.

Almost every call entering Bauer Funeral Home in Effingham, Ill., Involves a request for service for a Covid-19 victim. Nine of the 13 deaths over the past week were from the coronavirus, said Brian Young, funeral director, and the city’s other funeral home was also busy.

“It seemed to me that every time I answered the phone it was someone passing by a nursing home or a Covid hospital,” Mr Young said, noting that there were sometimes two or three. per day. With cases increasing after Thanksgiving, he’s bracing for even more.

Illness changed the whole funeral choreography.

Previously, it was not unusual for anyone who died in the close-knit corn and soybean farming community to see 50 to 60 relatives show up for a funeral. Not anymore. The funeral home is trying to arrange a quick visit of just 10 people at a time, all of whom are asked to wear masks – although those who refuse are not prohibited – and to leave the building promptly.

More than 800 kilometers away in Amarillo, Texas, Shafer Mortuary Services was also inundated. Responsible for transporting, embalming and cremating bodies, the company has seen demand triple in recent weeks, with around three in four deaths linked to Covid-19, said co-owner Candice Shafer.

“It’s overwhelming,” said Ms. Shafer, who is maximizing the capacity of her internal refrigerator for the first time and has had to call three mobile morgues.

So many people are dying, there are two weeks waiting to be cremated. Two of her embalmers quit, she said, for fear of catching the virus and infecting their families. Other employees are physically and emotionally spent as they wear masks, bodysuits and shoe covers in homes where everyone in the family – not just the deceased – has the coronavirus.

In the last shot, she said, they had to go back to the same families over and over again, as several loved ones die.

Yet there is barely time to deal with the bereavement, Ms. Shafer said. “The hospitals call us directly and say, ‘Come and get this person, we need the bed’.”

Sarah Mervosh reported from Dallas, and Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio and Neil MacFarquhar from New York. Erin Coulehan contributed reporting from El Paso and Mitch smith from Chicago.

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Another month on a warming planet: record November

Last month was the hottest November on record, European researchers said Monday, as the relentless warming of the climate turned out to be too high, even for the possible effects of cooler ocean temperatures in the region. tropical Pacific Ocean.

Scientists from the Copernicus Climate Change Service said global temperatures in November were 0.1 degrees Celsius (about 0.2 degrees Fahrenheit) above previous record holders, in 2016 and 2019. November 2020 was 0.8 degrees Celsius (or 1.5 degrees Fahrenheit) plus average from 1981 to 2010.

Warm conditions persisted over large swathes of the planet, with above-average temperatures highest in northern Europe and Siberia, as well as in the Arctic Ocean. Much of the United States was also warmer than average.

The Copernicus service said that so far this year temperatures were at the same level as 2016, which is the hottest year on record. Barring a significant drop in global temperatures in December, 2020 is expected to stay on par with 2016 or even become the hottest on record by a small margin, the service said.

“These records are consistent with the long-term warming trend of the global climate,” department manager Carlo Buontempo said in a statement. “All policy makers who prioritize climate risk mitigation should regard these recordings as alarm bells.”

In September, the world entered La Niña, a phase of the climate model that also brings El Niño and affects the weather across the world. La Niña is marked by cooler-than-normal sea surface temperatures in the eastern and central tropical Pacific Ocean. Last month, scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said La Niña had strengthened, meaning surface temperatures had dropped further.

While La Niña can bring warmer conditions to some areas – especially the southern United States – it usually has an overall cooling effect. Last week, releasing a World Meteorological Organization climate report that noted, among other things, that 2020 was on its way to be one of the three hottest years in history, the secretary-general of the organization, Petteri Taalas, said that La Niña’s cooling effect “was not enough to dampen the heat this year.

Marybeth Arcodia, a doctoral student studying climate dynamics at the University of Miami, said there are other elements that affect climate, including the natural oscillations of wind, precipitation, atmospheric pressure and temperatures. oceanic at different time scales. “There are so many different climatic factors at play that could mask this signal from La Niña,” Ms. Arcodia said.

But the most important element, she noted, is human-induced climate change.

“It should be borne in mind that the average global temperature is increasing at an unprecedented rate due to human influences,” she said. “That’s the main factor here.”

“So we will continue to see these record high temperatures even when we have climatic phases, like La Niña, which could bring cooler temperatures.”

Scientists from the Copernicus service said warm conditions in the Arctic last month slowed the freezing of Arctic ice Oce4an. The extent of sea ice cover was the second lowest in November since satellites began observing the area in 1979. A slower frost could result in thinner ice and therefore more melting in late spring and in summer.

The Arctic has been extremely hot for much of the year, part of a long-term trend in which the region is warming much faster than other parts of the world. The heat contributed to large forest fires in Siberia during the summer and led to the second lowest minimum extent of sea ice for a September, the end of the summer melt season.

The Copernicus Climate Change Service is part of the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, which is supported by the European Union. In the United States, NOAA also publishes monthly and annual temperature data, usually after the European agency. Although the analytical techniques differ, the results are often very similar.

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Virus deaths near spring record amid changing US crisis

On April 15, the United States reached a grim nadir in the pandemic: 2,752 people across the country are believed to have died from Covid-19 on Wednesday, more than any day before or since.

For months, the record remained a reminder of the pain the coronavirus inflicted on the nation and a warning of its deadly potential. But now, after seven desperate months of trying to contain the virus, daily deaths are rising sharply and quickly approaching that appalling number.

The way the virus kills in America, however, has changed dramatically.

Months of suffering have provided a horrific but valuable education: Doctors and nurses know better how to treat patients who contract the virus and how to prevent severe cases from ending in death, and a much smaller proportion of people who do. catch the virus die of it. than in the spring, experts say.

Yet the sheer scale of the current epidemic means the cost in lives lost every day continues to rise. More than 170,000 Americans now test positive for the virus on an average day, straining hospitals across much of the country, including many states that appeared to be avoiding the worst of the pandemic. More than 1.1 million people have tested positive in the past week alone.

At the height of the spring wave in April, around 31,000 new cases were reported each day, although this was a considerable undercount as testing capacity was extremely limited. Still, the toll of the virus was an abstraction for many Americans, as deaths were concentrated in a handful of states like New York, New Jersey and Louisiana.

Today, the dead are scattered across the country, and there is hardly a community that has not been touched. As 2,300 deaths were reported nationwide on Wednesday – the highest toll since May – only three counties reported a toll of more than 20.

Forty-four states set weekly case records and 25 states set weekly death records in November, with the country’s death toll surpassing 264,000 and officials fearful the Thanksgiving gatherings could cause an even wider spread. infections in the next few days.

As of April 15, more than half of those who died were in just three states: New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. Michigan, Massachusetts, Maryland and California also each reported more than 100 deaths that day.

But in much of the country, spring was much different.

In Oklahoma City, Lizanne Jennings, an intensive care nurse, was part of a team at her hospital planning the attack on the disease they were hearing about in places like Italy and New York. The staff counted the beds and calculated the number of people they could accommodate in the units.

“It was just always a ‘it comes, it comes’ feeling,” Ms. Jennings said, describing it as ‘pre-traumatic shock syndrome’.

In March, Ms. Jennings recalled sitting after work one day with her husband, Dennis Davis, a machinist and former bodybuilder.

“I need you to be careful,” recalls Ms. Jennings, 53, telling him. “Look at me: the people we know, the people we love – our family, our friends – people are going to catch this virus. And the people we know are going to die.

New York City alone recorded hundreds of deaths on April 15, highlighting its unique role in this spring wave.

“The city was silent except for the ambulances,” said Dr. Steven A. McDonald, emergency physician at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital.

In a locked city, emergency rooms were endlessly frantic, filled with breathless patients.

Dr McDonald went to work every day with the same thought in mind. “You know someone is going to die in your care that day,” he said. “The question is: how many people?”

The emergency began to fade in the city in early summer, but not before the virus had killed more than 20,000 people and infected, by one estimate, more than a fifth of New York’s population.

Today, the number of daily cases in New York City has started to rise again, averaging 6,600 per day in the metro area, a five-fold increase from the start of October. Yet, so far, the surge has nothing compared to that of spring.

Patrick J. Kearns, a funeral director in Queens, who in the spring had to regularly transport bodies to a crematorium in Schenectady, New York, nearly three hours away, noticed that a backlog of two or three days was was forming again in the city’s crematoria. He called Schenectady’s crematorium, he said, to let them know he could return in the coming weeks.

“We risk repeating what happened in April,” said Dr. Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota and member of President-elect Joseph R. Biden’s coronavirus mission. Jr. force, said of the death toll.

“Once you get over the cliff of cases, where you have so many cases that you overwhelm the system, basically when you fall off that cliff, you’re going to see the death rates go up dramatically,” he said. he declares. “I shudder to imagine what things might look like in two weeks.

With an inconsistent and shifting response from government officials, the virus surged into the solar belt in the summer, then began to increase steadily in the Midwest and the Great Plains – and then everywhere in recent weeks. The country hit a seven-day average high of 176,000 reported cases on Wednesday, and there are concerns the worst could happen. Epidemics continue to develop in southern California, western Texas and southern Florida.

After the increase in cases came the new wave of deaths.

Texas and Illinois have reported more than 800 deaths in the past week, while Pennsylvania, Michigan, California and Florida have added more than 400 each. In the Upper Midwest, where reports of new cases have started to level off, deaths continue to rise. Almost 40% of all coronavirus deaths in Wisconsin have been reported since early November. In North Dakota, where Nursing Sisters have been deployed to hospitals, more than 1 in 1,000 residents have now died.

The scattered nature of the disaster means it appears invisible in many places. The emergency is too widespread to attract teams of health care workers from other places to help. The sounds of ambulances are heard in many states. Families say their losses have at times been eclipsed in communities amid fatigue and impatience after more than eight months of social distancing and economic turmoil.

Across the country, forensic pathologists and funeral home directors are grappling with a steadily rising toll. “Our volume is exploding,” said Dale Clock, who with his wife owns and operates two funeral homes in western Michigan. Recently, they treated four deaths from Covid-19 in just 12 hours, he said. In the past two weeks, nearly half of the families they served had lost loved ones to the virus. This is all because a worker had to quarantine themselves because of the virus and staff are working overtime.

As of spring, Mr Clock said, homes had seen only a few deaths from Covid-19 every few weeks.

For Mrs. Jennings, the Oklahoma nurse, it’s been eight months.

His hospital’s surge in the spring never materialized, at least not in large numbers. In July, she traveled to Texas to work with Covid-19 patients at a hospital in the Rio Grande Valley, to find a community that was taking the virus seriously. But “the damage was done,” she said. Many patients, she says, did not survive.

Back in Oklahoma, she said many people didn’t seem to believe the virus was real or take it seriously. It frustrated her, she said.

Last Friday, her mother, Linda Jennings, who had been infected with the coronavirus, died.

“I’m tired and unhappy,” she recalls her mother, who was 78, as she lay in a hospital bed. “I can’t do this anymore.”

Then, on Monday, Ms Jennings sat next to her husband, eight and a half months after warning him of the dangers of this frightening new virus. He was lying face down in a hospital bed, hooked up to a machine that helps him breathe. He had been admitted 11 days earlier, she said, with a diagnosis of Covid-19.

“I love you so much,” recalls Ms. Jennings, holding his hand in the last hours before her death. “I said, ‘You’re going to go, okay? I let you go. You will be at peace. ”

Rick rojas contribution to reports.

Categories
Travel News

An American record: two million new cases of the virus in two weeks

For the first time since the coronavirus epidemic hit the United States, the country has added more than a million cases in each of the past two consecutive weeks. Covid deaths, which delay reported cases by several weeks, are also at a level not seen since the spring.






Total case and death per week

The United States added 1.2

million cases in the

last week.

The greatest number of deaths

registered since May

Until November, the United States had never had more than 500,000 cases per week.

With test capability

limited, the cases were

undercounted in the

spring.

Total case and death per week

The United States added 1.2 million

cases in the past week.

The greatest number of deaths

registered since May

Until November, the United States

never had more than

500,000 cases per week.

With test capability

limited, the cases were

undercounted in the

spring.

Total case and death per week

The United States added 1.2

million cases in the

last week.

The greatest number of

registered deaths

Since May

Until November, the

The United States has never had more

more than 500,000 cases

per week.

With test capability

limited, the cases were

undercounted in the

spring.

Total case and death per week

The United States added 1.2

million cases in the

last week.

The greatest number of

registered deaths

Since May

Until November, the

The United States has never had more

more than 500,000 cases

per week.

With test capability

limited, the cases were

undercounted in the

spring.

The United States added 1.2

million cases in the

last week.

Until November, the United States

never had more than

500,000 cases per

the week.

With test capability

limited, the cases were

undercounted in the

spring.

The greatest number of

registered deaths

Since May


Note: Data is as of November 23 | Source: New York Times database containing reports from local and state health agencies and hospitals

Some epidemiologists predict that the number of deaths in the coming weeks could exceed the spring peak, despite improved treatments.

Over the past week, the United States has added an average of 173,000 new cases daily. If this pattern of growth continues, the total number of reported cases for the entire month of November will likely reach 4.5 million. This would be more than double the number of any previous month.

With several days remaining in the month, around 3.3 million people in the United States had already tested positive for the coronavirus as of November 23.






Total number of new cases added each month

3.3 million cases

in the first 23 days

of the month

1.9 million cases

throughout the month

Total number of new cases added each month

3.3 million cases

in the first 23 days

of the month

1.9 million cases

throughout the month

Total number of new cases added each month

3.3 million cases

in the first 23 days

of the month

1.9 million cases

throughout the month

Total number of new cases added each month

3.3 million cases

in the first 23 days

of the month

1.9 million

case in the

whole month


Note: Data is as of November 23 | Source: New York Times database containing reports from local and state health agencies and hospitals

North Dakota continues to experience the nation’s worst outbreak after adjusting for population, a position it has maintained since early September. Nearly one in 10 North Dakota residents have tested positive for the virus since the outbreak began, a large majority in the past two months.

But cases there as well as other parts of the Upper Midwest and Mountain West that caused the initial fall rise have leveled off slightly, as cases multiply on both coasts and in the south. and the southwest.

Nearly 2,000 counties in the United States currently have their worst month in November, almost five times more than in October. The maps below show the month in which counties recorded their highest volume of work.






When every county recorded its worst month

When every county recorded its worst month

When every county recorded its worst month

When every county recorded its worst month

When every county recorded its worst month

When every county recorded its worst month


Note: Data is as of November 23 | Source: New York Times database containing reports from local and state health agencies and hospitals

The New York City metropolitan area saw more new cases in April than any other month. And many counties along the Gulf Coast, as well as Arizona and California, have had more cases in July or August than in November so far.

But with more than 40 states recording a sustained increase in the number of cases, it is likely that more of those counties will set a record this month.

Categories
Travel News

Video: Trump notes latest stock market record on his watch

Thank you so much. And I just want to congratulate everyone. The stock market, the Dow Jones industrial average just hit 30,000, which is the highest in history. We never broke 30,000 people. And that’s just despite everything that has happened with the pandemic. I am delighted with what has happened on the vaccine front. It has been absolutely incredible. None of this has ever happened medically, and I think people recognize that, and it has a big effect. But the stock market just broke 30,000. Never been broken this number. That’s a sacred number, 30,000. No one thought they would ever see it. This is the ninth time since the start of 2020, and the 48th time that we have broken records, under the Trump administration. And I just want to congratulate everyone in the administration who has worked so hard. And most importantly, I want to congratulate the people of our country, because there are no people like you. Thank you very much everybody. Thank you.

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