Categories
Travel News

The previous impeachment process

During the first two centuries of U.S. government, the House of Representatives conducted only two presidential impeachment proceedings.

By the time the sun set on Wednesday, he had led three in just 25 years – including two in the past year and a half, against the first president to be impeached twice.

Welcome to the story.

With a majority in the House voting Wednesday afternoon to impeach President Trump for inciting insurgency, just 13 months after the House impeached him for abuse of power and obstructing Congress, here’s a look at what happened the previous time.

In September 2019, President Nancy Pelosi announced that the House would open an impeachment inquiry against Mr. Trump.

She took that step – which she had previously resisted – in response to a phone call in which Mr. Trump pressured Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., then favorite of the Democratic presidential election. appointment and Hunter, the son of Mr. Biden. The call came shortly after Mr. Trump froze nearly $ 400 million in aid to Ukraine.

The resulting accusations indicated that Mr. Trump had abused his power by using government aid as leverage to persuade Ukraine to help him electorally, and that he had obstructed Congress by refusing to provide documents and by telling administration officials not to testify. The House impeached him on December 18, 2019, voting 230 to 197 to approve the abuse of power charge and 229 to 198 to approve the obstruction charge.

After weeks of hearings, lawmakers split almost entirely along party lines: No House Republican voted for impeachment on either charge, all but two Democrats voted on the abuse of power charge, and all but three Democrats voted for the obstruction charge.

On February 5, 2020, the Senate acquitted Mr. Trump of two counts: 52 to 48 for abuse of power and 53 to 47 for obstructing Congress. Utah Republican Senator Mitt Romney joined Democrats in voting to remove him from office for abuse of power, becoming the first senator to vote to convict a president of his own party.

The impeachment process against President Bill Clinton, a Democrat, began in October 1998 in response to the revelation that he had had sex with a White House intern.

The charges were not directly about his misconduct with intern Monica Lewinsky – who was 22, almost three decades younger than Mr. Clinton at first – but the allegation that Mr. Clinton lied about it under oath and encouraged others to do the same.

“I didn’t have sex with this woman,” Clinton said in January 1998, before admitting months later that he did. “I never told anyone to lie, not once. Never.”

On December 19, 1998 – 21 years almost to the day before a Democratic-controlled House voted to impeach Mr. Trump – the Republican-controlled House impeached Mr. Clinton for perjury and obstruction of justice. Votes were 228-206 on the perjury charge (with five Democrats voting for impeachment and five Republicans voting against) and 221 to 212 on the obstruction charge (with five Democrats voting for and 12 Republicans voting against) .

The House voted against impeachment on a second charge of perjury and on one charge of abuse of power.

On February 12, 1999, the Senate acquitted Mr. Clinton 55-45 on the perjury charge, with 10 Republicans joining all Democrats, and 50-50 on the obstruction charge, with five Republicans joining the Democrats. A two-thirds majority would have been needed to convict Mr. Clinton and remove him from office.

Congress never voted to impeach President Richard M. Nixon, a Republican, but only because he resigned before he could.

Much of the impeachment process stemmed from the Watergate scandal, which began in 1972 when associates of Nixon stormed into the Democratic National Committee headquarters. The break-in was part of a huge coordinated effort to influence the upcoming election, which Nixon ended up winning in one of the biggest landslides in American history.

The immediate catalyst for the decision of the House Judiciary Committee to begin the impeachment process on October 30, 1973 was the so-called Saturday Night Massacre 10 days earlier. It was the night that Nixon, enraged by the Watergate investigation, ordered the dismissal of the special prosecutor, Archibald Cox. Two officials he ordered to fire Cox refused to do so and resigned; the third, Solicitor General Robert Bork, obeyed.

The committee eventually approved three articles of impeachment – obstructing justice, abuse of power and contempt of Congress – and returned them to the House in July 1974. The articles were approved by three separate votes, the accusation of Most popular abuse of power: 28-10, with seven Republicans on the committee joining the 21 Democrats.

But before the Full House could complete its hearings and vote on impeachment, Nixon announced his resignation on August 8, 1974 – a day after Republican leaders in Congress told him his support in his own party had collapsed and that he almost certainly would. be both charged and sentenced.

More than any impeached president after him, Andrew Johnson was impeached not really for a specific violation of the law, but because of a broad power struggle between the White House and Congress.

Johnson – a Democrat and white supremacist who was Abraham Lincoln’s vice president and became president when Lincoln was assassinated – had spent much of his tenure clashing with Republican-controlled Congress for reconstruction. Among other things, he vetoed the Freedoms Bureau Bill and the Civil Rights Act of 1866, which sought to give US citizenship to former slaves; Congress subsequently overrode its veto on the Civil Rights Act.

In March 1868, the House approved 11 articles of impeachment against Johnson. The main charge was that he had violated the Tenure of Office Act of 1867, which Congress enacted in an explicit effort to prevent him from firing pro-Reconstruction officials Lincoln had appointed. The law said the president needed Senate approval to fire executive officials confirmed by the Senate, and Johnson challenged him by firing Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton.

In May 1868 Johnson was removed from office in a single vote. The Senate – then made up of 54 members, as there were only 27 states at the time – voted 35-19 in favor of the conviction, but needed 36 votes for the required two-thirds majority.

He served the remainder of his term, just under a year.

Categories
Travel News

The previous impeachment process

During the first two centuries of U.S. government, the House of Representatives conducted only two presidential impeachment proceedings.

By the time the sun set on Wednesday, he had led three in just 25 years – including two in the past year and a half, against the first president to be impeached twice.

Welcome to the story.

With a majority in the House voting Wednesday afternoon to impeach President Trump for inciting insurgency, just 13 months after the House impeached him for abuse of power and obstructing Congress, here’s a look at what happened the previous time.

In September 2019, President Nancy Pelosi announced that the House would open an impeachment inquiry against Mr. Trump.

She took that step – which she had previously resisted – in response to a phone call in which Mr. Trump pressured Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., then favorite of the Democratic presidential election. appointment and Hunter, the son of Mr. Biden. The call came shortly after Mr. Trump froze nearly $ 400 million in aid to Ukraine.

The resulting accusations indicated that Mr. Trump had abused his power by using government aid as leverage to persuade Ukraine to help him electorally, and that he had obstructed Congress by refusing to provide documents and by telling administration officials not to testify. The House impeached him on December 18, 2019, voting 230 to 197 to approve the abuse of power charge and 229 to 198 to approve the obstruction charge.

After weeks of hearings, lawmakers split almost entirely along party lines: No House Republican voted for impeachment on either charge, all but two Democrats voted on the abuse of power charge, and all but three Democrats voted for the obstruction charge.

On February 5, 2020, the Senate acquitted Mr. Trump of two counts: 52 to 48 for abuse of power and 53 to 47 for obstructing Congress. Utah Republican Senator Mitt Romney joined Democrats in voting to remove him from office for abuse of power, becoming the first senator to vote to convict a president of his own party.

The impeachment process against President Bill Clinton, a Democrat, began in October 1998 in response to the revelation that he had had sex with a White House intern.

The charges were not directly about his misconduct with intern Monica Lewinsky – who was 22, almost three decades younger than Mr. Clinton at first – but the allegation that Mr. Clinton lied about it under oath and encouraged others to do the same.

“I didn’t have sex with this woman,” Clinton said in January 1998, before admitting months later that he did. “I never told anyone to lie, not once. Never.”

On December 19, 1998 – 21 years almost to the day before a Democratic-controlled House voted to impeach Mr. Trump – the Republican-controlled House impeached Mr. Clinton for perjury and obstruction of justice. Votes were 228-206 on the perjury charge (with five Democrats voting for impeachment and five Republicans voting against) and 221 to 212 on the obstruction charge (with five Democrats voting for and 12 Republicans voting against) .

The House voted against impeachment on a second charge of perjury and on one charge of abuse of power.

On February 12, 1999, the Senate acquitted Mr. Clinton 55-45 on the perjury charge, with 10 Republicans joining all Democrats, and 50-50 on the obstruction charge, with five Republicans joining the Democrats. A two-thirds majority would have been needed to convict Mr. Clinton and remove him from office.

Congress never voted to impeach President Richard M. Nixon, a Republican, but only because he resigned before he could.

Much of the impeachment process stemmed from the Watergate scandal, which began in 1972 when associates of Nixon stormed into the Democratic National Committee headquarters. The break-in was part of a huge coordinated effort to influence the upcoming election, which Nixon ended up winning in one of the biggest landslides in American history.

The immediate catalyst for the decision of the House Judiciary Committee to begin the impeachment process on October 30, 1973 was the so-called Saturday Night Massacre 10 days earlier. It was the night that Nixon, enraged by the Watergate investigation, ordered the dismissal of the special prosecutor, Archibald Cox. Two officials he ordered to fire Cox refused to do so and resigned; the third, Solicitor General Robert Bork, obeyed.

The committee eventually approved three articles of impeachment – obstructing justice, abuse of power and contempt of Congress – and returned them to the House in July 1974. The articles were approved by three separate votes, the accusation of Most popular abuse of power: 28-10, with seven Republicans on the committee joining the 21 Democrats.

But before the Full House could complete its hearings and vote on impeachment, Nixon announced his resignation on August 8, 1974 – a day after Republican leaders in Congress told him his support in his own party had collapsed and that he almost certainly would. be both charged and sentenced.

More than any impeached president after him, Andrew Johnson was impeached not really for a specific violation of the law, but because of a broad power struggle between the White House and Congress.

Johnson – a Democrat and white supremacist who was Abraham Lincoln’s vice president and became president when Lincoln was assassinated – had spent much of his tenure clashing with Republican-controlled Congress for reconstruction. Among other things, he vetoed the Freedoms Bureau Bill and the Civil Rights Act of 1866, which sought to give US citizenship to former slaves; Congress subsequently overrode its veto on the Civil Rights Act.

In March 1868, the House approved 11 articles of impeachment against Johnson. The main charge was that he had violated the Tenure of Office Act of 1867, which Congress enacted in an explicit effort to prevent him from firing pro-Reconstruction officials Lincoln had appointed. The law said the president needed Senate approval to fire executive officials confirmed by the Senate, and Johnson challenged him by firing Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton.

In May 1868 Johnson was removed from office in a single vote. The Senate – then made up of 54 members, as there were only 27 states at the time – voted 35-19 in favor of the conviction, but needed 36 votes for the required two-thirds majority.

He served the remainder of his term, just under a year.

Categories
Travel News

Not an ideal process or an ideal deal, but, well, a deal

BOULDER, Colorado – The day before Thanksgiving, Dave Query had to shut down his restaurant for good. For 26 years, the Zolo Grill was a popular restaurant in Boulder serving Southwestern fare. But the slowdown in business, he said, and the cost of complying with state and county security protocols have grown too high.

“There comes a time when you have to put a bullet in the head and bury it in the backyard,” Query said. Several other restaurants he owns are facing challenges, he said, and at this point he’s looking for all the help he and his employees can get.

“It should have happened much sooner,” Query said of the stimulus package that congressional leaders agreed to on Sunday. “But everything is better than nothing.”

The legislation would provide direct payments and unemployment assistance to millions of Americans, as well as support for small businesses, hospitals and schools. For many, this is a long overdue relief as families have been driven from their homes and workers have lost their jobs.

Neither the deal, much smaller than the first stimulus package, nor the painfully protracted process that produced it seemed ideal to those interviewed on Sunday. But, as Mr Query said, at least there was – ultimately – an agreement.

The emergence of the coronavirus vaccine has raised hopes that there is light at the end of the tunnel, allowing many to imagine life on the other side of the pandemic.

The deal is expected to provide $ 600 in stimulus payments to millions of American adults earning up to $ 75,000 and revive stale additional federal unemployment benefits to $ 300 per week for 11 weeks – half the aid level provided by the $ 2.2 trillion stimulus bill passed in March.

It would also continue and increase benefits for on-demand workers and freelancers, and it would extend federal payments for people whose regular benefits have expired.

Raquel Lodestro, a massage therapist in the South Bronx, said she worked when she could, forced to leave her 10-year-old son at home while he attended distance school. “Three hundred dollars – yes that’s a blessing and I will appreciate it,” she said of UI, “but you tell everybody that $ 600 is too much.” ? “

“The point is,” she added, “that for us even moving forward during this pandemic was a godsend, for us to be able to survive.”

The previous stimulus package was passed about nine months ago, just as the virus took hold in the United States, prompting widespread stay-at-home orders restricting movement and trade. It took months to negotiate the new one as the pandemic spread uncontrollably and people burned their savings.

“This, the pandemic and the resulting economic impact, is not a partisan issue,” said Isabel McDevitt, who founded Ready to Work, an agency in Colorado that provides employment, housing and support services. support for adults leaving homelessness. “Republicans and independents, unaffiliated people, everyone is affected. So absolutely more action was needed. “

Lisa Hahn, a stay-at-home mom of four in Forest Hills, Queens, in March launched a support group for parents of children with special needs. Many parents in her group are unable to work, she said, as their children need constant supervision and one-on-one instruction to attend the remote school.

“I think a lot of our families, especially in New York, are really struggling – I hear it, I see it,” she said, adding, “I think they should have gone through this there. more than a month ago, or more. And I really think that should have been a bigger stimulus than it is.

In New York City, many are still marked by the darkest and deadliest days of the virus, and now, due to the economic situation, the city is still drained of people and talent.

Eric Ulloa, a theater and film writer who also stars on Broadway, said he saw messages from friends and colleagues being kicked out of town – “just postponing the dream of what they wanted to do “he said to play or to write or to compose or create or direct or photograph – each of those dreams are all hanging.

For those facing the most pressing needs, the payment of $ 600 would be welcome, but many wondered how much of a difference that would make.

Financial news site Business Insider calculated that in America’s largest cities, looking at average monthly spending, money would carry a two-person household for less than two weeks. The previous stimulus law provided for payments of up to $ 1,200. A report from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York found that most of these funds were used to pay down debt or to save.

Housing advocates have been encouraged to learn that the deal could include a moratorium on evictions.

“It’s great to hear, but again, we’re just putting more band-aids on some inevitabilities,” said Joseph Zanovitch, executive director of HOPE, a homeless outreach program in Colorado. “That’s a bright spot, but it’s also like an impending cliff – how long will that actually last?”

The deal does not include direct funding for state and local governments, which concerns Alec Garnett, the president-elect of the Colorado House of Representatives. And Mr Garnett said he was enraged by the inability of Washington lawmakers to reach a deal sooner.

“The slowness with which this has evolved is exactly what the Coloradans hate about partisan politicians in Washington,” Garnett, a Democrat, said, adding that his criticisms applied to both parties. “The differences should have been put aside months ago, to help keep small businesses open, keep them employed and keep food on the table.

Kathy Valentine, a mental health support advocate in Boulder, was among those who blamed President Trump for failing to facilitate a deal. “Direction?” she asked. “There is no such word in his vocabulary.”

The economic fallout from the pandemic has strained food banks. Nederland Food Pantry, which serves the rugged mountain communities of western Boulder County and neighboring Gilpin County, serves up to 185 households a week, up from 65 at the same time last year.

The Northeastern Iowa Food Bank in Waterloo has seen a similar increase in demand. “There are a lot of people who never thought they would be in this job because everyone was working,” said Barbara Prather, CEO of the food bank. “Things were going well. Then 2020 came, then the pandemic happened. “

Don Miller, owner of Austin, Texas-based County Line barbecue restaurant chain, was unsure how he would benefit from the stimulus package. But the previous one, he said, had helped him and his business for about three months.

“Whatever the stimulus package, it’s about time,” Miller said. “We are hung up here by our nails every day. And we just need to do something. Even if it’s just crumbs, every time they give it it’s great for us.

Charlie brennan reported from Boulder, Rick rojas from Nashville and Sarah Maslin Nir from New York. David Montgomery contributed reporting from Austin, Texas.

Categories
Travel News

Pennsylvania counties are beginning to certify results, despite Republican attempts to stop the process.

Several counties in Pennsylvania have certified the election results, as the process of consolidating the results in the state continues despite scattered efforts by local Republicans to stop the process.

In Allegheny County, the state’s second largest county and seat of Pittsburgh, the council voted 2–1 to certify the results, with Sam Demarco, the only Republican member, voting against. Mr DeMarco said his vote was an attempt to stimulate action in the state capital to make changes to the state’s voting laws, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported.

In Luzerne County, which Mr. Trump won by more than 14,000 votes, the board certified the results by 3–2 votes, again with Democratic board members voting to certify and both Republicans voting against.

State law states that counties in Pennsylvania must certify their votes on the third Monday after the election. But there’s no real penalty for missing the deadline, and several counties have missed it in the past.

Philadelphia plans to certify its results tonight at a meeting at 7 p.m. after the Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled Monday afternoon in a case involving approximately 8,000 ballots that had signatures but issues with the date or the address. The court ruled against the Trump campaign and the Republican allies, saying those ballots should be counted.

Once counties have certified the results, the process then moves to the Secretary of State’s office to approve the certification, which it is supposed to complete by November 30, and then to the governor’s office for final signing and award. voters. .

Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar and Governor Tom Wolf, both Democrats, are expected to act quickly once certification reaches their respective offices.

The Trump campaign had sought to stop the certification of the Pennsylvania election in court, but a judge dismissed the effort in a scathing opinion on Saturday.

“This tribunal was presented with unfounded strained legal arguments and speculative accusations, unsupported in the operational complaint and unsupported by evidence,” wrote longtime Republican Judge Matthew Brann who had been appointed by the former President Barack Obama. “In the United States of America, that cannot justify the denial of the right to vote of just one voter, let alone all voters in its sixth most populous state.”

Despite the harsh reprimand, the Trump campaign vowed to continue and filed an appeal to the Third Circuit on Sunday. In a statement last week, the campaign said it hoped the case would go to the Supreme Court.

But if Pennsylvania does certify its results, it will likely render the Trump campaign’s call to the Third Circuit moot because it centers on blocking certification.

State Republicans also filed a lawsuit to quash the election claiming the state’s expansion of no-excuse postal voting passed last October by a Republican-led legislature and left in place for over a year without objection until Mr. Trump loses. Pennsylvania, was unconstitutional.

Categories
Travel News

Biden calls Trump’s attack on electoral process ‘utterly irresponsible’

WASHINGTON – In his toughest condemnation to date of President Trump’s efforts to undermine the legitimacy of the 2020 election, President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. said on Thursday that Mr. Trump’s refusal to allow an orderly transition guaranteed that he would be remembered as “one of the most irresponsible presidents in American history.”

“It’s hard to understand how this man thinks,” Biden said in response to a question about the president’s extraordinary interventions in Michigan’s electoral certification process. “I’m sure he knows he hasn’t won and won’t win, and we’re going to be sworn in on January 20.

But Mr. Biden warned that as a result of Mr. Trump’s actions, “incredibly damaging messages are being sent to the rest of the world about how democracy works.”

“It sends a horrible message about who we are as a country,” he added.

Mr Biden spoke in Wilmington, Del., Shortly after a virtual meeting earlier in the day with five Democratic governors and five Republicans. Citing what he called the “tragic milestone” of more than 250,000 deaths from Covid-19, Mr Biden pledged swift action after taking office, but vowed not to impose a nationwide shutdown. And he attacked the president for blocking “access to all the information we need” on vaccinations and other viral data.

Asked directly about Mr Trump’s motivations for running for office and opposing a smooth transfer of power, Mr Biden appeared to be struggling to contain his frustration. In stark contrast to four years of an unrestrained occupant in the Oval Office, Mr. Biden paused, took a deep breath and said, “Let me choose my words.

The words he finally dwelled on: “Totally irresponsible”.

In his prepared remarks, Mr Biden remained focused on the urgent need to fend off the virus, which is part of a strategy in which the president-elect has attempted to present a calm but firm alternative to Mr Trump’s, focused on the fight against the virus. pandemic as opposed to the President’s erratic and unpredictable behavior.

Less than an hour later, Ron Klain, who Mr Biden announced last week would be his White House chief of staff, made the comparison explicit.

“As the President of the United States, in the midst of a crisis, was busy calling local election officials to try and get them to subvert the Michigan election, Joe Biden called out frontline health workers to hear their stories, ”Mr. Klain said in an interview on CNN.

He was referring to a thank you Mr. Trump sent to a Republican in the Wayne County, Michigan prospecting board who initially refused to certify election results showing Biden’s victory in the heavily Democratic region as well as to an invitation to the White House that the president extended to state lawmakers in an apparent effort to persuade them to challenge the will of their state’s voters and choose voters who would support Mr. Trump.

Mr. Klain said Americans have “long learned to expect the worst” from Mr. Trump, and accused the president of exceeding that expectation, saying “the president is struggling with these public relations stunts, these ridiculous unfounded allegations.

In his own remarks, however, Mr. Biden was cautious about what additional concrete steps he might take, if any, to begin a transition against Mr. Trump’s will. He did not rule out the possibility of legal action that could require General Service Administration chief Emily W. Murphy to sign documents authorizing a transition process – a process that would give the team Mr. Biden’s access to resources, data and people.

But he played down the idea, saying the prosecution “would take a long time.”

“At the moment,” he said, “the strategy is not changing.”

Mr. Biden suggested his best option was to persuade Republicans to recognize his victory and Mr. Trump to accept the inevitable and concede defeat.

“My judgment is that we will go further by working with our Republican colleagues now,” Biden said.

As he has done on several occasions in recent days, Mr Biden has warned that the delayed transition process is preventing him from planning an effective coronavirus response after his inauguration on January 20 and could slow national vaccine distribution.

“We cannot wait,” he said, calling the upcoming vaccine distribution “one of the greatest operational challenges we will have to face as a nation”.

“There is no excuse not to share the data and let’s start planning,” Mr. Biden said.

Asked by a reporter about his proposed name to be his Treasury secretary, Mr Biden said: “You will soon hear my choice for the Treasury.” He added that the announcement would come “either right before or right after Thanksgiving.”

Previously, Mr Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, who joined him in Wilmington, virtually met with governors from both parties. The group included John Carney of Delaware, Andrew M. Cuomo of New York, Michelle Lujan Grisham of New Mexico, Jared Polis of Colorado and Gretchen Whitmer of Michigan, all Democrats, as well as Charlie Baker of Massachusetts, Gary R. Herbert of the ‘Utah. , Larry Hogan of Maryland, Asa Hutchinson of Arkansas and Kay Ivey of Alabama, all Republicans.

“You need help,” Biden told governors as reporters were briefly allowed to listen. “I want you to know that I will be your partner in the White House.”

Ending the pandemic, Biden said later in his speech, will require cooperation with governors and local officials.

“No national shutdown. No nationwide shutdown, ”Biden said, forcefully denying an accusation Mr. Trump has repeated over and over during the campaign. “I do not see any circumstance that would require a total national shutdown.”

But he said the rapid spread of the virus across the country would require coordinated action, including a national agreement requiring people to wear masks and a federal government decision to help localities pay the significant costs of the fight. against disease, which has so far left Congress deeply divided and unable to cooperate.

Appearing on CNN later today, Mr Hogan urged Congress to pass a stimulus bill before a new session meets in January, and he echoed Mr Biden’s frustration with the delayed transition.

“We are concerned that they are not involved in the transition, that they will not find out,” said Mr. Hogan, a prominent Republican critic of Mr. Trump.

“We cannot afford to delay,” he added.

Mr Hogan said he believed some of the Republicans approving or refusing to refute Mr Trump’s election conspiracy theories were “afraid of the president.”

Even as Mr. Biden spoke, Vice President Mike Pence defended the Trump administration’s response to the coronavirus during the first appearance in months of the White House Coronavirus Task Force.

“America has never been so prepared to fight this virus as we are today,” Pence said, adding that the president ordered him to hold the briefing.

“President Trump wanted me to make it clear that our task force, this administration, and our president are not supporting another lockdown,” the vice president said.

At the same briefing, Dr.Anthony S. Fauci, the government’s top infectious disease expert, in his first public appearance at the White House in months, sought to reassure a nervous public about the safety of two promising candidates for the coronavirus vaccine, insisting that neither scientific integrity nor safety has been compromised.

“We need to end any concept that this was rushed inappropriately,” said Dr Fauci. “It’s really solid.”

Mr Biden said he was encouraged by his discussion with the governors and pledged to work with them upon taking office to ensure the country is unified in the fight against the virus.

“There was a real desire for a true partnership with the federal government,” Biden said. “Governors have made it clear that defeating Covid-19 will require that we all work together, as one country.”

Sheryl Gay Stolberg contributed reporting.

Categories
Travel News

Here’s a timeline of the presidential certification process Trump is trying to disrupt

Monday is also the deadline for counties of Pennsylvania to certify their totals and send them to Kathy Boockvar, the Commonwealth Secretary, who will certify the state’s results. Pennsylvania doesn’t have a deadline for Ms. Boockvar’s signing, but there’s no reason to expect a delay.

Maine also has its certification deadline of November 23, but there are no serious disputes there.

This is the certification deadline for Minnesota, North Carolina and Ohio, none of which should be controversial. Mr. Biden won Minnesota; Mr. Trump won North Carolina and Ohio.

Arizona must certify its results by that date, just as Iowa and Nebraska. Mr Biden won Arizona, Mr Trump won Iowa and in Nebraska Mr Trump won statewide, but Mr Biden won an electoral vote in the second congressional district of the ‘State.

The Arizona Republican Party is trying to delay certification, lobbying county officials and asking a court to postpone certification in Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix.

But in the absence of a court order – and, so far, courts have dismissed nearly every Republican challenge across the country – counties should certify on time and Katie Hobbs, Secretary of State and Democrat, should approve on final statewide certification.

No dispute is expected in Iowa or Nebraska that could delay certification.

It’s the deadline for Nevada and Wisconsin, both won by Mr. Biden, to certify their results.

In Nevada, the first step is for county commissioners to certify the results and send them to the Secretary of State, who will present summaries to the Nevada Supreme Court. Ultimately, the governor will have to confirm the result. The Trump campaign has launched a baseless lawsuit claiming that Mr. Trump did in fact win Nevada, and conservative groups are trying to overturn the results, but those claims are very unlikely to lead anywhere.

Categories
Travel News

Threats and tensions rise as Trump and his allies attack electoral process

Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich and Rudolph W. Giuliani, Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer and former mayor of New York, launched widespread attacks on cities with large black populations such as Atlanta, Detroit and Philadelphia , highlighting these places. free tirades because too corrupt to be reliable to organize honest elections.

The extraordinary assault on the voting system by the President and his allies has gained additional intensity as the deadlines for certification of results in several states approach. Once certified, the final tally will further prevent Mr. Trump’s attempt to reverse his loss.

Barring a breakthrough in the president’s legal push, his strategy appears to focus on disrupting the process by which states finalize the vote count and submit their delegate lists to the Electoral College.

Attempts by Republicans to follow his lead in Wayne County failed in the face of residents of Detroit who were outraged by what they saw as an outright attempt to deny them their rights. A public commentary session with hundreds of voters and civil rights leaders sparked a three-hour outcry as they condemned two white officials threatening the voting rights of hundreds of thousands of black voters.

“You look at the black towns and you took a black town out of the county and you said the only one at fault is the city of Detroit, where 80% of the people who reside there are African Americans,” exclaimed the Reverend Wendell. Anthony, the president of the Detroit Chapter of the NAACP, his face almost touching the computer screen. “Shame on you,” he added. “You are a shame.”

“But on January 20, 2021 at noon,” he said, “whatever you do, the President of the United States will be Joseph Biden and the Vice President, for the first time, will be a black woman. named Kamala Harris.

“Do you know how many young black teens voted for the first time this year?” Benita Bradley of Detroit said during the Zoom call Tuesday night. “And you sit here and slap these people in the face. What you are doing to the blacks and browns in this community is part of the problem, you are the problem. You are the reason young children fail to see the promise of the vote. But our country will move forward. We will unite. “

Categories
Travel News

Threats and tensions rise as Trump and his allies attack electoral process

Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich and Rudolph W. Giuliani, Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer and former mayor of New York, launched widespread attacks on cities with large black populations such as Atlanta, Detroit and Philadelphia , highlighting these places. free tirades because too corrupt to be reliable to organize honest elections.

The extraordinary assault on the voting system by the President and his allies has gained additional intensity as the deadlines for certification of results in several states approach. Once certified, the final tally will further prevent Mr. Trump’s attempt to reverse his loss.

Barring a breakthrough in the president’s legal push, his strategy appears to focus on disrupting the process by which states finalize the vote count and submit their delegate lists to the Electoral College.

Attempts by Republicans to follow his lead in Wayne County failed in the face of residents of Detroit who were outraged by what they saw as an outright attempt to deny them their rights. A public commentary session with hundreds of voters and civil rights leaders sparked a three-hour outcry as they condemned two white officials threatening the voting rights of hundreds of thousands of black voters.

“You look at the black towns and you took a black town out of the county and you said the only one at fault is the city of Detroit, where 80% of the people who reside there are African Americans,” exclaimed the Reverend Wendell. Anthony, the president of the Detroit Chapter of the NAACP, his face almost touching the computer screen. “Shame on you,” he added. “You are a shame.”

“But on January 20, 2021 at noon,” he said, “whatever you do, the President of the United States will be Joseph Biden and the Vice President, for the first time, will be a black woman. named Kamala Harris.

“Do you know how many young black teens voted for the first time this year?” Benita Bradley of Detroit said during the Zoom call Tuesday night. “And you sit here and slap these people in the face. What you are doing to the blacks and browns in this community is part of the problem, you are the problem. You are the reason young children fail to see the promise of the vote. But our country will move forward. We will unite. “