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How Black History Week Became Black History Month and Why It Matters Now

Developing alongside the Harlem Renaissance, Negro History Week uses every platform at its disposal to spread its message.

Dr Woodson and his colleagues have set an ambitious program for Negro History Week. They provided a Kindergarten to Grade 12 curriculum with photos, lesson plans and posters with important dates and biographical information. In an article published in 1932 titled “Negro History Week: The Sixth Grade,” Dr. Woodson noted that some white schools participated in Negro History Week programs and that this had improved race relations. . He and his colleagues also engaged the community at large with historic performances, banquets, lectures, breakfasts, beauty pageants and parades.

LD Reddick, a historian, heard “the father of Negro history” speak as a child in his hometown of Jacksonville, Florida. Everything about Dr. Woodson, he recalled, produced an “electric” effect. As Mr. Reddick wrote: “He performed well on the platform, I thought, moving pretty much like a skilled boxer: never in a hurry, never hesitant, skillfully fighting for openings, pushing his blows skillfully. Mr. Reddick, who would later collaborate with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on his book on the Montgomery Bus Boycotts, was amazed that Dr. Woodson was “easily … the most impressive speaker I have ever had. have never heard this time in my life.

Did you know?

For rural schools, Dr Woodson finally presented special kits for Black History Week that could include a list of suggested reading materials, speeches and photos of famous African Americans, and a play. theater on black history.

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On the eve of the critical second round of the Georgia Senate, Trump is complicating matters with more political pressure.

ATLANTA – Georgia’s second round of Senate will draw firepower from the highest levels of politics on Monday with the visit of President Trump and President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr., underscoring the urgency of an election to determine the Senate control and kept in the shadows Mr. Trump’s continued attacks on Republican state officials for his baseless allegations of electoral fraud.

Mr Trump is expected to hold a rally in the northwestern town of Dalton where he is expected to encourage his supporters to go to the polls on Tuesday to support the two outgoing Republicans in the races, Senators Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue. Northwestern Georgia is a crucial base of Republican support, but early voting turnout has been disappointing in many countries.

Mr Trump turned Georgia’s last campaign weekend upside down with an hour-long appeal to his Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger on Saturday in which the president embraced conspiracy theories and demanded that election officials of the state “find” him the votes that would give him. Georgia’s 16 electoral votes after the November presidential election.

The conversation with Mr Raffensperger, which was taped, could further hurt Republican hopes of winning the races – races that will determine which party controls the Senate. Some Republicans were already worried that Mr. Trump’s emphasis on his own electoral loss – and his relentless and baseless argument that the loss was due to electoral fraud – was taken literally by his supporters, who could end up stay at home rather than vote in what they believe to be a “rigged” electoral system.

In an interview with Fox News on Sunday night, Mr Perdue said he did not think Mr Trump’s call would have an impact on the election, but said he was shocked that a Republican colleague was “recording a sitting president, then flees him. “Mr. Perdue called for Mr. Raffensperger’s resignation in November.

Mr Raffensperger, a Republican, argued Georgia’s November race results are valid – a point he personally made to Mr Trump in Saturday’s phone call and in subsequent interviews .

“For the past two months we’ve been fighting the ‘whack-a-mole’ rumor, Raffensperger said Monday on Good Morning America.“ And it was pretty obvious early on that we debunked each of these theories that existed, but that the President Trump continues to believe them. He added, “The data he has is just plain wrong.”

Prior to his trip to Georgia, Mr. Trump’s daily advice to reporters regarding his schedule stated that he “would work from early in the morning until late in the evening.” He will be making many calls and holding many meetings. Usually, his schedule gives logistical details about specific meetings, not generalities about his day.

Mr Biden will travel to Atlanta on Monday to campaign for Democratic Senate candidates Jon Ossoff and Reverend Raphael Warnock. It is likely that Biden will discuss the president’s phone call with Mr. Raffensperger during his Atlanta-area rally on Monday.

Vice President Mike Pence is also expected to be in the state, with a visit to Rock Springs Church in Milner. The church pastor is a close friend and spiritual mentor of Mr. Perdue, who has been quarantined in recent days after his possible exposure to the coronavirus.

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Here’s why Georgia’s runoff matters.

As the dust settles from the presidential race, the eyes of the political world have already shifted to Georgia, where the second round of elections slated for early January will almost certainly determine which party controls the Senate.

The outcome of the contests, which will take place two weeks before the inauguration of President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr., will shift the majority towards Democrats, giving the new president broad power to carry out his political agenda and push through nominations. . as he sees fit, or leave the Republicans in charge, allowing them to influence his plans.

In the coming weeks, tens of millions of dollars in campaign money are expected to flow into the state to fund a political advertising marathon, as party leaders and interest groups on both sides draw their attention to races.

Click here to learn more about how it works.

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What is a runoff and why are there two? Here’s why Georgia matters

As the dust settles from the presidential race, the eyes of the political world have already shifted to Georgia, where the second round of elections slated for early January will almost certainly determine which party controls the Senate.

The outcome of the contests, which will take place two weeks before the inauguration of President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr., will shift the majority towards Democrats, giving the new president broad power to carry out his political agenda and push through nominations. . as he sees fit, or leave the Republicans in charge, allowing them to influence his plans.

In the coming weeks, tens of millions of dollars in campaign money are expected to flow into the state to fund a political advertising marathon, as party leaders and interest groups on both sides draw their attention to races.

Here is how it will work.

A second round of election is essentially a rematch that takes place when none of the candidates meet the criteria for victory. Under Georgian law, candidates must obtain a majority of votes to win an election. If neither candidate breaks the 50%, the top two vote-winners face off again in a second round to determine the winner.

Georgian second-round law was created in the 1960s as a way to preserve white political power in a predominantly white state and reduce the influence of black politicians who could more easily win in a multi-candidate race with a plurality of voice, according to an Interior Ministry. report.

Since the 1990s, Democrats have won only one of seven statewide ballots in general or special elections, according to Inside Elections, the non-partisan political bulletin.

As the Senate elections are staggered so that two state seats are not re-elected at the same time, it has been an unusual year for Georgia.

Senator David Perdue, a Republican, faced a normal re-election race for the seat he won in 2014. Additionally, Senator Kelly Loeffler, another Republican named last year to succeed Senator Johnny Isakson after having retired due to health concerns, faced a special election for the remainder of his term until 2022.

Their two races went to the second round because neither they nor their challengers garnered at least 50% of the vote.

After an extended tally that ended on Friday night, Mr Perdue fell just below the majority he would need to win re-election against Jon Ossoff, a Democrat, sending them both to a run-off. In 2017, Mr. Ossoff lost in the second round of the elections for a seat in the House.

It has been clear since Tuesday that Ms Loeffler’s race would be decided in a second round, after Reverend Dr Raphael Warnock, a Democrat, and Ms Loeffler proved to be the top two in a crowded peloton competing to replace Mr Isakson. .

Georgian law stipulates that the second round must take place on the Tuesday of the ninth week after the elections. That puts them on January 5. Voters must be registered to participate by December 7.

The state will hold three weeks of early voting. Registered voters can vote by mail if they request a vote by mail.

It has traditionally been more difficult for candidates to convince voters to run for elections that do not feature a presidential ballot, and this special election will come shortly after the New Year with the country still in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.

In the past, Democrats have struggled in such races, with Republicans dominating the format in conservative learning Georgia.

But both parties are expected to devote considerable resources to training their voters for the second round, and as there are no other races in the country, huge national attention will be focused on the Georgia.

The stakes will be high. The Republicans hold a majority of 53 to 47, but after this week’s election they were tied 48 to 48 with the Democrats. While Senate races in Alaska and North Carolina have yet to be triggered, Republicans are expected to win in those states, which would give the party control of 50 seats.

If Republican leaders in those states hold, Democrats would have to capture both seats in Georgia to ensure a 50-50 tie in the Senate. Then, Vice President-elect Kamala Harris could cast decisive votes to carry out the Democratic agenda. If they lost one, Republicans would retain their majority, albeit by the tiniest of margins.

With judicial nominees, a stimulus deal, infrastructure and health care measures, as well as tax and spending policies all at stake, Senate races in Georgia are expected to pick up an intensity that mirrors the presidential race. which just ended.

And with President Trump refusing to concede and baselessly accusing him of the election being stolen from him, Republicans will likely try to use their grievances about the presidential race to galvanize their voters to travel to Georgia and deny Mr. Biden the Senate that he would. need to get things done.

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Voters say Black Lives Matter’s protests were significant. They don’t agree on why.

Black voters have said they don’t believe Mr. Biden will be a solution to all of the policing issues in their communities. But at least he recognized the systemic racism, they said, which Mr. Trump refused to do. They hoped Mr. Trump’s exit would mean more civility.

“We have a lot of people who have shown their faces and their horns,” said Lakaisha Stoner, 27, a small business owner in Louisville, adding that she hoped racism would be less visible in the future. “I’m just ready for a positive change, I can’t stress that enough,” she said.

A new president is the starting point, she added.

In a sign that the video of a police officer killing Mr. Floyd made an impression on the public, even among supporters of the president, 70% of voters polled in the AP VoteCast poll said racism in police services was a very serious or fairly serious problem. , and of those voters, three in ten voted for Mr. Trump.

And for some immigrants who are neither black nor white, the protests have unfolded in a complicated way. Jose Nunez, an electrician who immigrated from the Dominican Republic in 2002, said he voted for Mr. Trump in 2016, but this time voted for Mr. Biden. He changed because he noticed an ugliness among Mr. Trump’s supporters with waving flags and angry placards. But, he said, Democrats also needed to broaden their appeal to him.

“I don’t want to talk about race or everyday police brutality,” he said. “It’s crazy.”

Others really wanted both sides to talk about other things. Jose Soto, 37, a Navy veteran in Madison, Wisconsin who now works for the Department of Veterans Affairs, said he cares most about education and health care, but none of the issues seemed to be raised in the countryside. He loved Bernie Sanders, saying, “That feels like every time he talks he talks to me “and voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016. On Tuesday he voted for Mr. Trump.

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Voters say Black Lives Matter’s protests were significant. They don’t agree on why.

Black voters have said they don’t believe Mr. Biden will be a solution to all of the policing issues in their communities. But at least he recognized the systemic racism, they said, which Mr. Trump refused to do. They hoped Mr. Trump’s exit would mean more civility.

“We have a lot of people who have shown their faces and their horns,” said Lakaisha Stoner, 27, a small business owner in Louisville, adding that she hoped racism would be less visible in the future. “I’m just ready for a positive change, I can’t stress that enough,” she said.

A new president is the starting point, she added.

In a sign that the video of a police officer killing Mr. Floyd made an impression on the public, even among supporters of the president, 70% of voters polled in the AP VoteCast poll said racism in police services was a very serious or fairly serious problem. , and of those voters, three in ten voted for Mr. Trump.

And for some immigrants who are neither black nor white, the protests have unfolded in a complicated way. Jose Nunez, an electrician who immigrated from the Dominican Republic in 2002, said he voted for Mr. Trump in 2016, but this time voted for Mr. Biden. He changed because he noticed an ugliness among Mr. Trump’s supporters with waving flags and angry placards. But, he said, Democrats also needed to broaden their appeal to him.

“I don’t want to talk about race or everyday police brutality,” he said. “It’s crazy.”

Others really wanted both sides to talk about other things. Jose Soto, 37, a Navy veteran in Madison, Wisconsin who now works for the Department of Veterans Affairs, said he cares most about education and health care, but none of the issues seemed to be raised in the countryside. He loved Bernie Sanders, saying, “That feels like every time he talks he talks to me “and voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016. On Tuesday he voted for Mr. Trump.