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Governors are ordering their National Guard troops to return home after some have been told to sleep in a parking lot.

The governors of Texas, Florida and New Hampshire said they ordered their National Guard troops to return home from Washington, DC, after some Guard members providing security at the inauguration were subsequently told to sleep in a parking lot.

“They’re soldiers, they’re not Nancy Pelosi’s servants,” Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a Republican, said on “Fox and Friends“Friday morning.” It’s a half-armed mission at this point, and I think the proper thing is to bring them home. “

His comments came after Governor Greg Abbott of Texas and Governor Chris Sununu of New Hampshire, also Republicans, said they too had called for the return of their troops.

“They have done an outstanding job serving our nation’s capital during a time of conflict and should be graciously praised, not subjected to substandard conditions,” Mr. Sununu written on twitter Friday morning.

The governors’ orders were the last signs of outrage over the relocation of troops on Thursday on the floor of a parking lot at Thurgood Marshall’s Federal Judicial Building. Members of Congress demanded that members of the National Guard be returned to the Capitol building, with some offering to let the troops sleep in their offices. They were eventually returned to Capitol Hill, said Captain Edwin Nieves Jr., a spokesman for the Washington, DC branch of the National Guard on Friday morning.

He said troops were moved from Capitol Hill Thursday afternoon at the request of Capitol Police due to “increased foot traffic” as Congress returned to session, but a statement from the acting chief of Capitol Police on Friday sought to keep the besieged agency away from the move.

Chief Yogananda Pittman said Capitol Police did not tell troops to leave the Capitol except at certain times on inauguration day, and even then troops were encouraged to return to the building at 2 p.m. That day. She said officials of the office building whose troops were using the parking lot had contacted “the National Guard directly to suggest the use of its facilities.”

The reaction from governors and lawmakers comes with scores of troops already leaving the city, their mission ended after President Biden was sworn in on Wednesday. The Pentagon said Friday that most of the approximately 26,000 National Guard troops who had helped secure the event were returning home. About 19,000 troops from across the country have started packing and returning to their home states, a process that will take around five to 10 days and will include coronavirus screenings.

About 7,000 troops are expected to remain in Washington until the end of January to provide support to federal agencies and guard against a possible repeat of the January 6 violation of the Capitol by supporters of President Trump.

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National Guard troops who protected the Capitol for Biden’s inauguration were told to sleep in a parking lot.

National Guard troops who were brought in to protect Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s nomination as president found themselves sleeping in an unheated garage hours after being kicked off the Capitol on Thursday, causing an uproar among the lawmakers who rushed to push them back.

The troops were among more than 20,000 members of the National Guard who provided security for the inauguration on Wednesday. They were transferred Thursday afternoon to the nearby Thurgood Marshall Federal Judicial Building, said Captain Edwin Nieves Jr., spokesperson for the Washington, DC branch of the National Guard.

“As Congress is in session and foot traffic and business is on the increase, Capitol Police have asked troops to move their rest area outside the Capitol,” Captain Nieves said, adding that the relocation was temporary. The DC National Guard did not say how many soldiers were stationed in the garages or how long they would stay there.

Two Guard soldiers, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said they had been relocated without explanation and had no adequate electricity, heating or toilets. One soldier estimated there were 1,000 soldiers sharing a portable toilet outside the garage.

“No orientation on the mission, the length of the mission, nothing,” the soldier said.

The soldiers also said their comrades were breathing exhaust fumes because the garage in the Thurgood Marshall center was still being used for parking.

Captain Nieves said the move was temporary and the garage had heating and toilets.

“We remain an agile and flexible force to ensure the safety and security of the Capitol and its surroundings,” he said.

Reports of the move sparked protests from lawmakers from both parties, including the parliamentary minority leader Kevin mccarthy, Republican and Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Democrat of New York. Some have offered to house the Guard troops in their offices.

“This is unacceptable and needs to be corrected,” Arizona Democrat Senator Mark Kelly wrote on Twitter.

.

On social media, some lawmakers said they were making efforts to bring troops back to Capitol Hill.

In a tweet, Sen. Chris Murphy, Democrat of Connecticut, said he spoke to the acting Capitol Police chief about the issue.

The DC Guard did not immediately respond to a request Thursday night, inquiring about efforts to bring troops back to Capitol Hill.

On Tuesday, the Pentagon said 12 Guardsmen were removed from their posts during Mr. Biden’s inauguration after officials discovered they had written texts and social media posts containing comments threatening to politicians.

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Lawmakers are seeking to send National Guard soldiers back to Capitol Hill after being transferred to sleep in a parking lot.

A number of lawmakers expressed outrage on Thursday evening following reports that troops who had been mobilized to ensure the safety of President Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s inauguration were told they could no longer sleeping inside the Capitol and had been relocated Thursday afternoon. at the garage of the nearby Thurgood Marshall Federal Judicial Building.

“This is unacceptable and needs to be corrected,” Arizona Democrat Senator Mark Kelly wrote on Twitter. “I will make my office available to all guards who need it and I will encourage others to do the same.” A number of other lawmakers, including Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Democrat of New York and Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, Democrat of Arizona, have also offered their offices.

Two Guard soldiers, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said they had not received any explanation as to why they were transferred early Thursday afternoon, and said they had no electricity, no heating, no adequate toilets. A Guard soldier estimated that 1,000 of them shared a single portable toilet installed outside the parking lot.

“No orientation on the mission, the length of the mission, nothing,” the soldier said.

The two Guards said their comrades were breathing exhaust fumes because the garage in Thurgood Marshall’s center was still being used as a parking lot; the soldiers there, they said, were National Guardsmen from Maryland, Virginia, Tennessee and Alabama

Asked for comments, a spokesperson for the Bureau of the National Guard addressed questions to the Washington, DC National Guard, which he said was in charge of the living conditions of the more than 20,000 Guard soldiers who were providing security for the inauguration.

“As Congress is in session and foot traffic and business is on the increase, Capitol Police have asked troops to move their rest area outside of Capitol Hill,” said Captain Edwin Nieves Jr. , spokesperson for the Washington, DC National Guard. “They were temporarily transferred to the garage at the Thurgood Marshall judicial center with heating and toilets.”

“We remain an agile and flexible force to ensure the safety and security of the Capitol and its surroundings,” he added.

The DC National Guard was not immediately able to say how many soldiers were stationed in parking garages, how long they would stay there, and whether additional portable toilets would be made available to them.

On social media, some lawmakers have also said they are making efforts to bring troops back to Capitol Hill.

In a tweet, Sen. Chris Murphy, Democrat of Connecticut, said he spoke to the acting Capitol Police chief about the issue.

A DC Guard spokesperson did not immediately respond to a request Thursday evening asking for information on efforts to bring troops back to Capitol Hill.

Earlier in the week, 12 Guard soldiers were dismissed from their posts after officials discovered texts and social media posts that made threatening comments towards politicians.

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Forced to leave the Capitol, the soldiers of the National Guard now sleep in a parking lot.

On Thursday afternoon, National Guard soldiers who had been mobilized to provide security for the inauguration of President Joseph R. Biden Jr. were told they could no longer sleep inside the Capitol and were transferred to the parking lot of the Thurgood Marshall Federal Judicial Building. close.

Two Guard soldiers, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said they had not received any explanation as to why they were transferred early Thursday afternoon, and said they had no electricity, no heating, no adequate toilets. A Guard soldier estimated that 1,000 of them shared a single portable toilet installed outside the parking lot.

“No orientation on the mission, the length of the mission, nothing,” the soldier said.

Asked for comments, a spokesperson for the Bureau of the National Guard addressed questions to the Washington, DC National Guard, which he said was in charge of the living conditions of the more than 20,000 Guard soldiers who were providing security for the inauguration.

“As Congress is in session and foot traffic and business is on the increase, Capitol Police have asked troops to move their rest area outside of Capitol Hill,” said Captain Edwin Nieves Jr. , spokesperson for the Washington, DC National Guard. “They were temporarily transferred to the garage at the Thurgood Marshall judicial center with heating and toilets.”

“We remain an agile and flexible force to ensure the safety and security of the Capitol and its surroundings,” he added.

The DC National Guard was not immediately able to say how many soldiers were stationed in parking garages, how long they would stay there, and whether additional portable toilets would be made available to them.

The two Guards said their comrades were breathing exhaust fumes because the garage in Thurgood Marshall’s center was still being used as a parking lot; the soldiers there, they said, were National Guardsmen from Maryland, Virginia, Tennessee, and Alabama.

Earlier in the week, 12 Guard soldiers were dismissed from their posts after officials discovered texts and social media posts that made threatening comments towards politicians.

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Video: ‘We need to reach a lot more people,’ says de Blasio

new video loaded: ‘We need to reach a lot more people,’ says de Blasio

transcription

transcription

“ We need to reach a lot more people, ” says de Blasio

On Monday, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that New York City would double the number of coronavirus vaccination sites in the city and expand the pool of people eligible for vaccination.

We’re going to ask all New Yorkers to be a part of this effort, every agency in the city, every hospital, every part of our society needs to come together so that these millions of vaccinations take place by the end of January. And much more. I want that in January, in the coming weeks, I want us to start vaccinating educators and school staff. I want to see us vaccinate first responders of all kinds – cops, firefighters, all walks of life. We are currently focusing on our health heroes. We focus on nursing homes. But during the month of January, we need to expand these categories. We need to reach a lot more people. We’re going to do a variety of things to expand the sites where we will have, through our Department of Health, pop-up sites that will be focused on health care workers. We’re going to have sites created by health and hospitals, our public health system. We are going to create vaccination centers, and three of them will be open on Sunday. And that’s the shape of things to come. You’re going to see a lot more like this.

Recent episodes of Coronavirus pandemic: latest updates

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What to know about Covid antibody drugs that could help a lot

Two new antibody treatments have shown promise in preventing high-risk Covid-19 patients from being discharged from hospital.

But despite a publicity boost from President Trump, who received the Regeneron treatment in October and hailed it as a “cure,” the drugs have not been widely used since being approved for emergency use in the month. last by the Food and Drug Administration.

Now federal and state health officials are urging patients and doctors to seek treatments.

Here’s what you need to know.

The two treatments, by Eli Lilly and Regeneron, are the first drugs developed specifically for Covid – to be approved by the FDA, and consist of artificially synthesized copies of antibodies that people naturally produce when their immune systems fight infection. Eli Lilly’s medicine consists of an antibody. Regeneron’s is a cocktail of two.

The first data showed that they could prevent hospitalization in people at high risk of serious complications from the disease. Clinical trials are continuing. The treatments are thought to work by helping to stop the virus soon after infection.

Treatments can be given to anyone who has tested positive for the coronavirus, is at high risk of developing a severe form of the disease, and is within 10 days of the development of the first symptoms.

This includes people who are at least 65 years old and those who are obese or have health problems like diabetes.

Treatments are not allowed for people who have been hospitalized in the past or who need oxygen, as studies in these groups have not shown that the drugs work well.

Under the agreements each company has with the federal government, the doses will be free, although some patients, depending on their insurance coverage, may have to pay for the administration of the drug, which must be administered by a supplier. health care.

Monoclonal antibody treatments are difficult and time consuming to manufacture, which has limited the number of doses produced by drug manufacturers.

The federal government bought 950,000 doses from Eli Lilly and 300,000 doses from Regeneron. Pharmaceutical companies have already shipped hundreds of thousands of these doses, with the rest expected by the end of January.

No one knows, but many of the doses distributed so far have gone unused and are in hospital refrigerators.

Although the federal government has nearly 532,000 doses of the two drugs and nearly 291,000 doses have been shipped, neither the government nor the drug companies have complete data on the number of these doses administered to patients.

The subset of hospitals reporting data to the government on the number of doses administered used only 20 percent of their supply, on average, according to the Department of Health and Human Services.

Medicines are used unevenly across the country. Some hospitals cannot receive enough doses. Others haven’t even used much of what they’ve gotten so far.

Various factors have contributed to underutilization: Hospitals are overwhelmed by the viral outbreak and are focusing on administering the first vaccines. And they need to find a space in their crowded facilities where treatments can be infused for a period of several hours without spreading the virus to others.

Some patients have been reluctant to venture out for treatment, whether it is because they are not ready to go to a clinic while they are feeling sick, have no transportation, or that they perceive drugs to be available only for the good – connected people. And the very scarcity of treatments contributes to their underutilization, as some hospitals withhold their supplies for fear of running out.

There is no direct line or single website to help patients find a provider offering treatment.

Many health systems have ways in place to identify and contact eligible patients who test positive for the coronavirus at test sites or doctor’s offices. But these referral systems vary from community to community.

Eli Lilly’s support hotline for her treatment is 1-855-545-5921. A Regeneron spokeswoman recommended that patients or doctors contact their public health department.

Dr Daniel Skovronsky, scientific director of Eli Lilly, said he advises friends and family members to call the company’s hotline. “If you are persistent and you qualify, you will get it,” he says.

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What to know about Covid antibody drugs that could help a lot

Two new antibody treatments have shown promise in preventing high-risk Covid-19 patients from being discharged from hospital.

But despite a publicity boost from President Trump, who received the Regeneron treatment in October and hailed it as a “cure,” the drugs have not been widely used since being approved for emergency use in the month. last by the Food and Drug Administration.

Now federal and state health officials are urging patients and doctors to seek treatments.

Here’s what you need to know.

The two treatments, by Eli Lilly and Regeneron, are the first drugs developed specifically for Covid – to be approved by the FDA, and consist of artificially synthesized copies of antibodies that people naturally produce when their immune systems fight infection. Eli Lilly’s medicine consists of an antibody. Regeneron’s is a cocktail of two.

The first data showed that they could prevent hospitalization in people at high risk of serious complications from the disease. Clinical trials are continuing. The treatments are thought to work by helping to stop the virus soon after infection.

Treatments can be given to anyone who has tested positive for the coronavirus, is at high risk of developing a severe form of the disease, and is within 10 days of the development of the first symptoms.

This includes people who are at least 65 years old and those who are obese or have health problems like diabetes.

Treatments are not allowed for people who have been hospitalized in the past or who need oxygen, as studies in these groups have not shown that the drugs work well.

Under the agreements each company has with the federal government, the doses will be free, although some patients, depending on their insurance coverage, may have to pay for the administration of the drug, which must be administered by a supplier. health care.

Monoclonal antibody treatments are difficult and time consuming to manufacture, which has limited the number of doses produced by drug manufacturers.

The federal government bought 950,000 doses from Eli Lilly and 300,000 doses from Regeneron. Pharmaceutical companies have already shipped hundreds of thousands of these doses, with the rest expected by the end of January.

No one knows, but many of the doses distributed so far have gone unused and are in hospital refrigerators.

Although the federal government has nearly 532,000 doses of the two drugs and nearly 291,000 doses have been shipped, neither the government nor the drug companies have complete data on the number of these doses administered to patients.

The subset of hospitals reporting data to the government on the number of doses administered used only 20 percent of their supply, on average, according to the Department of Health and Human Services.

Medicines are used unevenly across the country. Some hospitals cannot receive enough doses. Others haven’t even used much of what they’ve gotten so far.

Various factors have contributed to underutilization: Hospitals are overwhelmed by the viral outbreak and are focusing on administering the first vaccines. And they need to find a space in their crowded facilities where treatments can be infused for a period of several hours without spreading the virus to others.

Some patients have been reluctant to venture out for treatment, whether it is because they are not ready to go to a clinic while they are feeling sick, have no transportation, or that they perceive drugs to be available only for the good – connected people. And the very scarcity of treatments contributes to their underutilization, as some hospitals withhold their supplies for fear of running out.

There is no direct line or single website to help patients find a provider offering treatment.

Many health systems have ways in place to identify and contact eligible patients who test positive for the coronavirus at test sites or doctor’s offices. But these referral systems vary from community to community.

Eli Lilly’s support hotline for her treatment is 1-855-545-5921. A Regeneron spokeswoman recommended that patients or doctors contact their public health department.

Dr Daniel Skovronsky, scientific director of Eli Lilly, said he advises friends and family members to call the company’s hotline. “If you are persistent and you qualify, you will get it,” he says.

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Brian Kemp threw his lot with Trump and now has paid the price

On the same day Mr. Ducey was chosen as head of the Republican Governors Association, Arizona Rep. Andy Biggs said Mr. Ducey had “damaged the common cause of the Republican Party,” in a column on a conservative news site.

“The Duceys and the Kemps of the world, they can have a hard time if they want to run for elected office in the Republican Party,” said Michael Burke, Republican Party chairman for Pinal County in Arizona. “People will remember what happened here,” added Mr. Burke, who worked at Mr. Trump’s properties before entering politics.

The president’s allies have started issuing veiled threats against Mr. Kemp, warning that what they see as his insufficient loyalty to the president could come at a political price.

“If you don’t fight for Trump now when he needs you most as the Republican leader in Georgia, people won’t fight for you when you ask them to be reelected,” the Senator said. Lindsey Graham, from South Carolina. , in an appearance on Fox News.

Democrats are trying to exploit these divisions. MeidasTouch, a progressive national political committee, plans announced this week to put up billboards in Georgia sporting a tweet from Trump that reads, “Why bother to vote Republicans if what you get is Ducey and Kemp?” Mr Biden plans to travel to the state next week to campaign for the two Democratic candidates, who would give his party control of the Senate if they win the second round against the incumbent Republican on January 5.

Particularly striking is Mr. Kemp’s descent from Mr. Trump’s circle of approval. Throughout his career, he has strived to demonstrate his conservative credentials: in a particularly unsubtle advertisement that ran during his candidacy for governor in 2018, titled “So Conservative”, he demonstrated his desire to “blow up government spending” with real explosives “Cut through regulations” with a real chainsaw.

It was Mr. Trump’s positive tweet just days before the second round of the Republican primaries that helped Mr. Kemp win the nomination. Then, in the general election, Mr. Kemp became one of the most persistent villains of the Trump era in the eyes of the left after his narrow victory over Stacey Abrams, who was trying to become the country’s first black female governor.

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Now the United States has a lot of fans – but too few specialists to run them

Now the United States has plenty of ventilators – but too few specialists to operate them A production explosion has solved the severe shortage that defined the first wave of Covid. But the excess may not be enough to prevent a large number of deaths.

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County with no coronavirus cases (and a lot of suspicion)

MENTONE, Texas – Zoom into the glowing red map of the ever-increasing coronavirus cases in the continental United States and you will find a county that has been spared. Only one, from coast to coast.

Like a lonely house standing after a tornado razed a city, Loving County, in the shadowless plains of oil-rich West Texas, has yet to record a single positive case of the coronavirus.

This is something the people of the county are proud of. They are talking. They live on it.

“You can take that off!” Chuck Flushe told a visitor with a face mask at the window of his food truck as a pair of bare-faced oilfield workers moved around. “We don’t have the virus here.”

If only it was true.

Although never included in official county reports, at least one positive test for the coronavirus was recorded over the summer at a local health clinic in Mentone, the county’s only town, according to a clinic worker.

The man was living in what everyone in that part of Texas calls a “men’s camp” – temporary housing for temporary oil and gas workers – near the center of town when he fell ill. But since he was not a permanent resident and was promptly returned home, Loving County never reported the case. His file remained intact.

Ten months after the registration of the first infection in the United States, the coronavirus has made its way to all corners of the country. More than 11 million people have tested positive for the virus, which causes Covid-19, with more than 164,000 new cases emerging on Monday alone.

Today, even rural areas, which quickly escaped the brunt of the pandemic, have become serious hotbeds of new infections. In recent months, a decreasing number of remote small counties, including Loving County, have remained the only places in the Americas without a positive case.

One by one, everyone started recording the infections. The latest in addition to Loving County to officially fall was Esmeralda County in Nevada, which reported its first case last week. (Kalawao County in Hawaii, which has even fewer people than Loving County, has also reported no known cases.)

Those who live full-time in Loving County – the smallest population in the Americas, with no more than 169 people spread over 669 square miles of sand, mesquite and greasewood – attribute their relative antiviral success to the landscape and the scarcity of population. They joke that they were socially distant before it was cool.

“It’s a desert city. It is what it is, ”said Steve Simonsen, the county attorney. “We’re not talking about the number of cows per acre, but the number of cows per section. One section is 640 acres. “

But despite the wide open space, the county is busy. The census counts 10 times the number of county workers as residents. Trucks carrying equipment for the oilfields or large boxes of sand for fracking moan through the city in a constant, noisy stream. Plastic trash and pieces of blown truck tire litter the side of the road.

As one crosses the county at night, the lights of oil and gas operations twinkle across the landscape, creating the mirage of a distant city that can never be reached. “You go past that hill and it looks like you’re driving into Dallas or Fort Worth,” Mr. Simonsen said.

The men – and especially the men who work in Loving County – are walking back and forth at the One Store for Miles, a relatively new convenience store where the queue for beer and individual meals can stretch. extend to rear refrigerators during 5pm peak. .

“Toilets to come” displays a banner in all capitals hanging outside. On a recent weekday evening, a buyer wore a cowboy hat. More had on the mesh trucker caps. None were masked. The clerks either. The county is exempt from a statewide mandate.

But even though the virus is not on the mind in Loving County, it has been life changing here.

The pandemic has caused oil prices to drop, reducing the number of workers in cities. The men’s camps were less full. Hotel rooms that were just $ 350 a night a few months ago in Pecos, the nearest large town, were now a third the price.

“With the pandemic, a lot of things have been shut down,” said Ricardo Galan, 38, who works for a supply company that he says has gone from 50 employees to 12.

Mr Galan, from Eagle Pass, near the Texas border with Mexico, said he typically spent about 12 days on the job and then got four days off. He considered himself lucky to be only five hours from his family. Some workers come from much further afield, such as Utah or Louisiana.

While in Loving County, Mr. Galan lived in a men’s camp on his business property, sharing a small living space with another worker. He said the workers practiced social distancing. “In our backyard, no one got sick from Covid,” he says.

But, he added, no one was tested unless they had symptoms. “They don’t test you just to test you,” Mr. Galan said. For this, workers have to go to bigger cities like Odessa or Midland.

A private health clinic offers coronavirus tests and performs about 20 per week, according to Anthony Luk, 28, a paramedic. Mr Luk, like most workers in the county, lives in a trailer – his own is attached to the clinic – and stays for two weeks between rest periods at his home in Lubbock.

While there, he said, the clinic had two positive tests for the coronavirus: in August, involving the man at the camp near the center of Mentone, and one carried out at a construction site outside of Loving County.

The August case raised alarm bells at the county courthouse, as clerks and other county employees often head to the camp for a free lunch on work days.

“We’re very well known when something like this happens here,” said Angela Medlin, 31, a deputy county clerk who moved with her husband and four children to Mentone last year. “I know at least one guy who was sick, but they brought him back where he was from,” she said, recalling the summer situation.

In town, residents draw a clear line between themselves and visitors. Those who live in the county full time treat each other like members of a larger family bubble.

At the courthouse, a square brick building dating from 1935, the doors are now locked to strangers and county employees do not wear masks. When a person comes to visit, such as a landowner looking for new oil or gas leases, the person should make an appointment and wear a mask.

A Halloween party for the town’s kids drew around 60 people and included temperature checks at the door. People felt comfortable not wearing masks.

But there are few such gatherings in Mentone, where the county’s history of oil booms and busts can be read in rusty hollow storage tanks, empty corrugated cardboard houses, and cracked plaster of the only school, unused for decades.

“When we got here I said, ‘Punk, how long are we going to live in this abandoned place? Recalls Mary Belle Jones, 89, who moved to Loving County in 1953 with her husband, Elgin Jones.

There were rattlesnakes in the yard of their first home, she remembered, and a toilet in the back. They had five children, moved to a bigger house, accumulated acres upon acres of land, and never left.

Mr Jones, known to everyone by his childhood nickname, rose from the oilfields to being sheriff for nearly three decades. “He was known as the only Texas Sheriff you could call Punk and get away with it,” Ms. Jones said.

Their children went to the local school until the sixth grade. But there was a lack of students, then it closed. The kids are now taking a 6am bus to the next eastern county.

Several members of the Jones family remained in County Loving. One son, Skeet Jones, is the county’s top ruler. His sister is the county clerk. Mr. Simonsen, the county prosecutor, married into the family.

“She was spending more time here than at home, so we decided to move,” Mr. Simonsen, a lawyer who last lived in Houston, said of his wife. “I knew there was no lawyer here in town, then.

For Leroy Medlin, 33, moving to Loving County was a dream come true. This is not the case for Angela, his wife, who had to be convinced.

“She just didn’t care the idea,” he says, sitting in a wicker recliner on his porch at the end of town, a cowboy hat on a table by his side.

Mr Medlin, who was fired from his job as a San Antonio Police detective for lying to justify car chases and then lost his job in town as a deputy sheriff, works as a cowboy on the ranch Jones family.

“I like to go back in time a bit. That’s why I’m here, ”he says.

Some residents said they were aware of the coronavirus cases in the county, but because they were limited to visiting visitors, the county still considers itself virus-free – if that’s on a technical point.

Most of the tests carried out in the county have involved workers from the oil and gas field, according to Luk, at the local clinic. And these would be recorded in the county where the employees live, not Loving County, said Lara Anton, a spokesperson for the state’s health department.

Have permanent residents been infected? Officially, it’s still a no.

But the people of Loving County admit their perfect record is probably not perfect anymore.

“To say that we are the only place in the United States that has never had a Covid case, I don’t think that’s true,” Mr. Simonsen said. “It’s a bit of a hype, but it’s definitely here.”