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Key lawmakers were not told about police back-up demand ahead of riot, aide and others say

While his suit was colorful, prosecutors said his intentions were dark. In an 18-page document submitted to court on Thursday, prosecutors said Mr Chansley approached a Capitol Police officer and shouted that members of the crowd “were there to take the Capitol and look for the leaders of Congress ”.

Mr. Chansley, a member of the QAnon conspiracy movement known as “Q Shaman,” wrote a note to Mr. Pence, reading: “It’s only a matter of time, justice is coming.”

Phoenix Federal District Court Judge Deborah M. Fine on Friday denied Chansley bail, saying he was “an active participant in a violent insurgency to overthrow the United States government “. When Mr. Chansley asked to speak, Judge Fine told him it was “not desirable”.

In Texas, a federal prosecutor said another suspect, Lt. Col. Rendall Brock Jr., was planning to take hostages in zipper cuffs when he stormed the Capitol last week, and the lawyer pointed to the violent online threats Mr Brock made in preparation for the mob attack.

Steven M. D’Antuono, the head of the FBI’s Washington Field Office, said the public provided the FBI with about 140,000 digital tips, noting that friends and family had reported rioters and advised those involved in the violence to surrender before the FBI found them.

“If this investigation were a football game,” Mr. D’Antuono said, “we would still be in the first quarter.”

Reporting was contributed by Eileen Sullivan, Zolan Kanno-Youngs, Katie benner, Nicolas fandos and Hailey Fuchs from Washington, Simon romero Albuquerque and Alan feuer from New York.

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Some lawmakers say they don’t feel safe because of the behavior of their colleagues during the siege on Capitol Hill.

Ms Pressley echoed Ms Ocasio-Cortez, write on twitter that she didn’t feel safe with some lawmakers.

“The second I realized that our ‘safe room’ from the violent white supremacist mob included treacherous, white supremacist, anti-mask members of Congress who were inciting the crowd in the first place, I walked out,” he said. Mrs Pressley said.

Ms. Ocasio-Cortez and Ms. Pressley are both members of “The Squad,” a group of four progressive women of color in Congress. They have been verbally attacked by the Conservatives and the President for their policies.

Rep. Lauren Boebert, Republican of Colorado, drew criticism from Democrats for tweet about the location of President Nancy Pelosi during the attack, despite reports that lawmakers were instructed by security officials not to reveal their whereabouts. Ms. Boebert subsequently dismissed the gravity of his actions.

“They accuse me of having tweeted live the presence of the speaker after she was safely evicted from the Capitol, as if I was revealing a big secret, when in fact this withdrawal was also being broadcast to television, ”Ms. Boebert said in a statement. Monday.

In the week leading up to the Capitol siege, Ms Boebert, an ardent gun rights activist, posted an ad stating that she would take her Glock with her on the streets of Washington, including on her way to work. . On her way to the House chamber for the impeachment vote on Wednesday, Ms Boebert caused a spectacle as she pushed her way through metal detectors, which were installed as part of heightened security measures after the attack , and ignoring the police who asked him to stop. .

Ms Boebert and other freshman Republicans, such as Georgia’s Marjorie Taylor Greene and North Carolina’s Madison Cawthorn, have questioned or outright flouted guidelines designed to protect lawmakers from violence, intruders or the coronavirus.

“I didn’t know if I was going to make it to the end of this day alive,” Ms. Ocasio-Cortez said during her livestream. “Not just in a general sense, but also in a very, very specific sense.”

Luke broadwater contribution to reports.

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Republican lawmakers are accused of giving tours of the Capitol to insurgents before the riot as new investigations are opened.

“The members of Congress who had groups crossing the Capitol that I saw on January 5, recognition for the next day, those members of Congress who incited this violent crowd,” Ms. Sherrill said, “these members who have tried to help our president undermine our democracy, I’ll see they are held accountable.

Ms. Sherrill did not respond to follow-up questions.

Rep. Tim Ryan, Democrat from Ohio, said lawmakers were aware of the tours but are now looking at them in a new light given the attack. He said they included “handfuls” of people and the authorities were aware of their existence. “Now you look back at some things and you look at them differently so, yeah, we look at that,” he said.

Mr. Crow said he was aware of the tours but was not sure what they were.

Pressure is mounting on Republican members of Congress who partnered with far-right groups in the days leading up to the mob attack. Several of Mr. Trump’s strongest supporters, including Reps Mo Brooks of Alabama and Paul Gosar and Andy Biggs, both of Arizona, have been accused of helping plan the January 6 rally that led to the violent attack on the Capitol.

A photo was also deceptively circulated online on Wednesday claiming to implicate Colorado Rep. Lauren Boebert for giving such a tour, but that was from 2019 in Colorado.

Mr Crow said he found the photo disturbing nonetheless because others saw it as “symbols of white power gangs.”

“I am very concerned about the potential complicity of the members,” said Mr. Crow. “There are certainly many examples of incentives for which members of Congress are responsible. I think we need to do an investigation to find out what exactly happened.

Representative Steny H. Hoyer, the majority leader of Maryland, played down the prospect of immediate discipline for lawmakers until the impeachment process against President Trump is completed.

“There will be time to sort this out,” Hoyer said of far-right Republicans in Congress. “Right now, we’re dealing with the president.

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Many do not have access to pads and tampons. What are lawmakers doing about it?

– Clare Pfeiffer, plaintiff in stamp tax class action lawsuit


In Her Words is available as a newsletter. Sign up here to receive it in your inbox.

The holiday season has arrived with a multitude of additional costs for Diamond Cotton.

Ms Cotton, an Indianapolis-based mother of three, had to buy Mucinex for a cold, extra tissues and Christmas gifts: an Amazon tablet for her son, a discounted Nintendo for a girl, and sketchbooks for the other. But the expenses weighed heavily on Ms Cotton, 30, who was fired from her housekeeping job at the start of the pandemic.

As she struggled to save money for her family’s needs – meals, clothes, school supplies – she found menstrual products especially difficult to cover. Menstrual products for her and her two daughters, 10 and 11, can sometimes cost as much as $ 50 a month, Ms. Cotton said, because they each have different cycles and needs.

She decided to contact I Support the Girls, a nonprofit organization that provides free tampons and sanitary napkins, which she had read online: “I had to reach out and say, ‘Hey, we’re not going. make it happen, ”she said. .

Ms. Cotton, like millions of people around the world, was going through a “period of poverty” – a lack of access to pads or tampons, in this case for financial reasons. For some, the financial deficit is so severe that they may have to miss school or work during their period.

For decades, lawmakers around the world have remained largely silent on the issue of epoch poverty. But as policymakers and advocates have begun to break the taboo, with women political leaders focusing on women’s health needs, countries around the world are developing policies to make these products more accessible. In most cases, that means helping to cut costs, but some are taking a bolder approach: Last November, Scotland became the first country to make vintage goods free for everyone, meaning that local authorities have a mandate to ensure that anyone who needs it can access it.

Replicating something resembling Scottish law in the United States would be difficult, period fairness activists point out, because of the size difference in the population; Scotland’s population is only half the size of New York City. But the United States, too, has begun to adopt its own set of local and federal policies that help make vintage products more widely available.

In recent years, six states have required that menstrual products be provided in schools, and 13 states have required that they be provided in prisons and prisons. In 2017, the US Department of Justice agreed to provide every woman in federal prison with menstrual products free of charge. And in March, the CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security) law included provisions to purchase menstrual products with money from health savings and flexible spending accounts.

Period equity activists celebrated the provision, noting Congress recognizes the role period products play in women’s financial insecurity. “Economic relief for women is essential this year,” said Jennifer Weiss-Wolf, co-founder of the legal and advocacy organization Period Equity.

But not all Americans have a flexible savings account, and campaigners stress this new provision will not be relaxed each women’s access to menstrual products: “There is no magic rule law,” Ms. Weiss-Wolf said.

Some states are considering abolishing the taxes associated with tampons. There are currently 30 states in which products are subject to sales tax. In most states, sales taxes make exemptions for various necessities. States collectively earn more than $ 150 million a year from taxing menstrual products. The Period Equity organization maintains that this is not only embarrassing for women, but also unconstitutional. They argue that the tax amounts to a violation of the equal protection clause, since the law targets a bodily function associated with women.

In August, Michigan plaintiffs filed a class action lawsuit against the stamp tax. “I never sued anyone, let alone the state,” said Clare Pfeiffer, 46, a plaintiff in the Michigan lawsuit. “But period products are not a luxury item. I know how important it is to restore the dignity of people facing a crisis.

Laura Strausfeld, co-founder of Period Equity, helped initiate a similar lawsuit in New York state in 2016, which was dropped after a law was passed to ban the state’s stamp tax. She believes the Michigan case will prompt other states to stop the tax before facing similar lawsuits.

“The challenge with Michigan’s stamp tax is to warn other states,” she said. “They are maintaining an unconstitutional law and we are going to take legal action to dismantle the tax.”

Canada, Australia, South Africa and India are among the countries in recent years that have eliminated these taxes on menstrual products. The “UK stamp tax” was abolished as of January 1.

But ideally, proponents say, these products would be provided free everywhere.

In 2019, Representative Grace Meng, a Democrat from New York, introduced the Menstrual Fairness for All Act, a sweeping bill that would help women from specific populations, including students, inmates and those on Medicaid. , to access free periodic products.

For much of her life, Ms. Meng had not given serious thought to the issue of period poverty, as she was always able to afford towels or tampons when she needed them. When she received a letter from a college student in her district explaining that the products were not available at homeless shelters in New York City, the congresswoman was dismayed.

“It was heartbreaking to hear that a young girl doesn’t have money for these products and skips school every month when she has her period,” Meng said. “It meant she wasn’t getting the full education she deserved.”

As Ms Meng began to draft legislation on the issue and search for collaborators across Capitol Hill, she encountered an unusual hurdle – colleagues embarrassed to discuss the issue. “Sometimes people think, ‘Alright, I’m going to sign your bill, stop talking about it,’ she says.

But the letter from her young elector had planted the seeds of a new mission for Ms. Meng: to make vintage products accessible to all who need them.

She started by focusing on New York City, advocating for a law that would make menstrual products available to public school students, shelter residents and inmates, which was passed in 2016. Ms. Meng also persuaded the Federal Emergency Management Agency to add menstrual products to the list of items that homeless aid organizations could purchase through grants from the federal government.

Beyond and within New York City, the challenges faced by individuals purchasing period products remain significant. According to a calculator built by Dominika Miszewska, a Warsaw medical student, with her friend Julia Żuławińska, a biophysics student, the average woman spends $ 9 a month on menstrual products.

“There were times when I had to choose between menstrual products and diapers for my children,” said Amber, 39, who lives in Baltimore and asked to be identified by her first name so that she could speak openly. from subject. “I had to find other ways like making makeshift towels, which I’m not proud of.”

As campaigners call for a change in policy, nonprofits continue to provide interim relief by donating menstrual products to those in need. Dana Marlowe, founder of nonprofit I Support the Girls, said her organization donated more vintage products than ever this year. More than 8 million people have fallen into poverty since May.

“Women have borne the brunt of this pandemic in many ways, from job loss to food insecurity,” Ms. Marlowe said. “When you associate it with menstrual inequalities, your periods are even more difficult to manage month after month. It’s like a bloody slap in the face.

In Her Words is available as a newsletter. Sign up here to receive it in your inbox. Write to us at inherwords@nytimes.com.

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Many do not have access to pads and tampons. What are lawmakers doing about it?

– Clare Pfeiffer, plaintiff in stamp tax class action lawsuit


In Her Words is available as a newsletter. Sign up here to receive it in your inbox.

The holiday season has arrived with a multitude of additional costs for Diamond Cotton.

Ms Cotton, an Indianapolis-based mother of three, had to buy Mucinex for a cold, extra tissues and Christmas gifts: an Amazon tablet for her son, a discounted Nintendo for a girl, and sketchbooks for the other. But the expenses weighed heavily on Ms Cotton, 30, who was fired from her housekeeping job at the start of the pandemic.

As she struggled to save money for her family’s needs – meals, clothes, school supplies – she found menstrual products especially difficult to cover. Menstrual products for her and her two daughters, 10 and 11, can sometimes cost as much as $ 50 a month, Ms. Cotton said, because they each have different cycles and needs.

She decided to contact I Support the Girls, a nonprofit organization that provides free tampons and sanitary napkins, which she had read online: “I had to reach out and say, ‘Hey, we’re not going. make it happen, ”she said. .

Ms. Cotton, like millions of people around the world, was going through a “period of poverty” – a lack of access to pads or tampons, in this case for financial reasons. For some, the financial deficit is so severe that they may have to miss school or work during their period.

For decades, lawmakers around the world have remained largely silent on the issue of epoch poverty. But as policymakers and advocates have begun to break the taboo, with women political leaders focusing on women’s health needs, countries around the world are developing policies to make these products more accessible. In most cases, that means helping to cut costs, but some are taking a bolder approach: Last November, Scotland became the first country to make vintage goods free for everyone, meaning that local authorities have a mandate to ensure that anyone who needs it can access it.

Replicating something resembling Scottish law in the United States would be difficult, period fairness activists point out, because of the size difference in the population; Scotland’s population is only half the size of New York City. But the United States, too, has begun to adopt its own set of local and federal policies that help make vintage products more widely available.

In recent years, six states have required that menstrual products be provided in schools, and 13 states have required that they be provided in prisons and prisons. In 2017, the US Department of Justice agreed to provide every woman in federal prison with menstrual products free of charge. And in March, the CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security) law included provisions to purchase menstrual products with money from health savings and flexible spending accounts.

Period equity activists celebrated the provision, noting Congress recognizes the role period products play in women’s financial insecurity. “Economic relief for women is essential this year,” said Jennifer Weiss-Wolf, co-founder of the legal and advocacy organization Period Equity.

But not all Americans have a flexible savings account, and campaigners stress this new provision will not be relaxed each women’s access to menstrual products: “There is no magic rule law,” Ms. Weiss-Wolf said.

Some states are considering abolishing the taxes associated with tampons. There are currently 30 states in which products are subject to sales tax. In most states, sales taxes make exemptions for various necessities. States collectively earn more than $ 150 million a year from taxing menstrual products. The Period Equity organization maintains that this is not only embarrassing for women, but also unconstitutional. They argue that the tax amounts to a violation of the equal protection clause, since the law targets a bodily function associated with women.

In August, Michigan plaintiffs filed a class action lawsuit against the stamp tax. “I never sued anyone, let alone the state,” said Clare Pfeiffer, 46, a plaintiff in the Michigan lawsuit. “But period products are not a luxury item. I know how important it is to restore the dignity of people facing a crisis.

Laura Strausfeld, co-founder of Period Equity, helped initiate a similar lawsuit in New York state in 2016, which was dropped after a law was passed to ban the state’s stamp tax. She believes the Michigan case will prompt other states to stop the tax before facing similar lawsuits.

“The challenge with Michigan’s stamp tax is to warn other states,” she said. “They are maintaining an unconstitutional law and we are going to take legal action to dismantle the tax.”

Canada, Australia, South Africa and India are among the countries in recent years that have eliminated these taxes on menstrual products. The “UK stamp tax” was abolished as of January 1.

But ideally, proponents say, these products would be provided free everywhere.

In 2019, Representative Grace Meng, a Democrat from New York, introduced the Menstrual Fairness for All Act, a sweeping bill that would help women from specific populations, including students, inmates and those on Medicaid. , to access free periodic products.

For much of her life, Ms. Meng had not given serious thought to the issue of period poverty, as she was always able to afford towels or tampons when she needed them. When she received a letter from a college student in her district explaining that the products were not available at homeless shelters in New York City, the congresswoman was dismayed.

“It was heartbreaking to hear that a young girl doesn’t have money for these products and skips school every month when she has her period,” Meng said. “It meant she wasn’t getting the full education she deserved.”

As Ms Meng began to draft legislation on the issue and search for collaborators across Capitol Hill, she encountered an unusual hurdle – colleagues embarrassed to discuss the issue. “Sometimes people think, ‘Alright, I’m going to sign your bill, stop talking about it,’ she says.

But the letter from her young elector had planted the seeds of a new mission for Ms. Meng: to make vintage products accessible to all who need them.

She started by focusing on New York City, advocating for a law that would make menstrual products available to public school students, shelter residents and inmates, which was passed in 2016. Ms. Meng also persuaded the Federal Emergency Management Agency to add menstrual products to the list of items that homeless aid organizations could purchase through grants from the federal government.

Beyond and within New York City, the challenges faced by individuals purchasing period products remain significant. According to a calculator built by Dominika Miszewska, a Warsaw medical student, with her friend Julia Żuławińska, a biophysics student, the average woman spends $ 9 a month on menstrual products.

“There were times when I had to choose between menstrual products and diapers for my children,” said Amber, 39, who lives in Baltimore and asked to be identified by her first name so that she could speak openly. from subject. “I had to find other ways like making makeshift towels, which I’m not proud of.”

As campaigners call for a change in policy, nonprofits continue to provide interim relief by donating menstrual products to those in need. Dana Marlowe, founder of nonprofit I Support the Girls, said her organization donated more vintage products than ever this year. More than 8 million people have fallen into poverty since May.

“Women have borne the brunt of this pandemic in many ways, from job loss to food insecurity,” Ms. Marlowe said. “When you associate it with menstrual inequalities, your periods are even more difficult to manage month after month. It’s like a bloody slap in the face.

In Her Words is available as a newsletter. Sign up here to receive it in your inbox. Write to us at inherwords@nytimes.com.

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Before Capitol Riot, Republican lawmakers fanned the flames

WASHINGTON – Standing in front of a crowd of thousands of MAGA-clad protesters on the National Mall on Wednesday, Representative Mo Brooks issued a message that members of Congress who dared to accept the victory of President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. to hear .

“Today is the day that American patriots start taking names and kicking ass,” said Mr. Brooks, Republican of Alabama. “Are you ready to do whatever it takes to fight for America? Stronger! Do you want to fight for America?

Hours later, pressed by President Trump at the same rally, rioters stormed the Capitol, where Congress was meeting to formalize the election of Mr. Biden, chanting “Hang on Mike Pence”, threatening to shoot on President Nancy Pelosi and forcing lawmakers to evacuate the building in a scene of violence and chaos. Police subsequently recovered long guns, Molotov cocktails, explosive devices and fasteners. At least five people, including a Capitol Police officer, died during the protests and the siege and immediately after.

Even after the tear gas was released and the Capitol secured, more than 135 House Republicans, including the two main party leaders, ultimately voted to reject millions of legally cast votes, responding to rioters’ demands and responding to Mr. Trump’s appeal to Congress. overturn the election results in his favor.

But a handful of Mr. Trump’s most loyal allies in the House had gone even further in the days and weeks leading up to the riot, urging their supporters to come to Washington on January 6 to take one last provocative stand to keep it going. in power. They tied guns with the protest organizers and used belligerent and inflammatory language to describe the issues.

Representatives Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia and Lauren Boebert of Colorado, first-term lawmakers who presented themselves as outspoken supporters of Mr. Trump, called the day a Republicans’ “1776 moment”.

Arizona Rep. Paul Gosar, who for weeks promoted the Jan. 6 protest and other “Stop the Steal” events across the country more than a dozen times, has repeatedly called Mr. Biden of an “illegitimate usurper” and suggested that Mr. Trump was the victim of an attempted “coup”.

“Be prepared to defend the Constitution and the White House,” Mr. Gosar wrote in an op-ed titled “Are We Witnessing a Coup?”

As rioters besieged the Capitol, Mr. Gosar posted a calm message on Twitter, saying to his followers: “Let us not get carried away here.” But he wrote a much nicer post on Speak, using the same photo of people climbing the walls of the building: “Americans are upset.

Their comments raised questions about the degree of coordination Republicans have with the protest organizers. In a tweet since deleted, Rep. Pete Sessions, Republican of Texas, wrote that he “had a great meeting today with the folks at Stop The Steal,” one of the main groups that organized the rally. last week.

And in another video, Ali Alexander, a far-right activist and conspiracy theorist who emerged as a leader of Stop the Steal, claimed that he, along with Mr. Brooks, Mr. Gosar and Rep. Andy Biggs from Arizona, had established the January 6 event in motion.

“The four of us planned to put maximum pressure on Congress while they voted,” Alexander said in a video that has since been deleted, “so that those whom we cannot rally, we can change the hearts and minds of the people. Republicans who were in this body, hear our loud roar from outside.

A spokesperson for Mr Biggs denied in a statement Monday that lawmakers had played a role in organizing the rally, and said he had focused his efforts on working “within the law and established a precedent to restore the integrity of our elections. “

“Congressman Biggs has never heard of or met Mr. Alexander – let alone work with him to organize part of a protest scheduled for Jan. 6,” spokesman Daniel Stefanski said. “He had no contact with any protesters or rioters, and he never encouraged or encouraged the January 6 rally or protests.”

But Mr. Gosar appeared to be on good terms with Mr. Alexander, frequently tagging him in Twitter messages. At a rally late last month outside the Arizona state capitol where Mr. Gosar spoke, Mr. Alexander called the congressman a “spirit animal of this movement. “.

“He helped where he could,” Mr. Alexander said. “He offered to call the donors. In fact, we had our first walk in Washington, because he called me and he said, “You have to go to the Supreme Court”. I said, “Very well, captain.” And that’s what started it.

For his part, Mr. Brooks has remained without excuse for his role in encouraging rioters.

“I make no apologies for doing my best to urge patriotic Americans not to abandon our country and to fight anti-Christian socialists in the elections of 2022 and 2024,” Brooks told a newspaper local. “I encourage ALL citizens to watch my entire rallying speech and decide for themselves what kind of America they want: an America based on liberty and liberty or one based on ungodly dictatorial power. .

Rep. Tom Malinowski, Democrat of New Jersey, on Monday introduced a resolution to formally censure Mr. Brooks, saying he was responsible for inciting the crowd and “endangering the lives of his colleagues in Congress.”

“We’re going to need to take a broader look at those members of Congress who may have encouraged or even facilitated the attack on Capitol Hill,” Malinowski said in an interview.

“People like Brooks have literally put the lives of their colleagues at risk,” he said.

Other House Democrats were pushing to invoke Section 3 of the 14th Amendment, added after the Civil War, which disqualifies people who “have engaged in an insurgency or rebellion” against the United States from holding office public. The clause was originally enacted to limit the influence of the former Confederates during the time of reconstruction.

Representative Cori Bush, Democrat of Missouri, on Monday introduced a resolution with 47 co-sponsors that would open inquiries for “the impeachment of members who attempted to overturn election results and incited an attempted coup.” State of White Supremacy ”.

“I can’t act like this doesn’t affect me,” Ms. Bush said in an interview about being on Capitol Hill during the siege. “I felt in danger. My staff were in danger.

Ms Bush said she did not ultimately know how many members of Congress should be expelled, but expected to learn the number from an Ethics Committee investigation.

“Even if it’s just a few, we need to make sure the message is clear that you can’t be a sitting congressman and incite an insurgency and work to overthrow an election,” a- she declared.

For weeks before the rally, mimicking Mr. Trump’s tone, Republican members and lawmakers had used inflammatory language to describe the president’s efforts to overturn Mr. Biden’s victory.

At a Turning Point USA event in December, Rep. Madison Cawthorn from North Carolina encouraged attendees to “call your congressman and feel free – you can threaten them slightly.”

“Say, ‘If you don’t support electoral integrity, I’m coming after you. Madison Cawthorn is coming after you. Everyone is coming after you, ”said Mr. Cawthorn.

Some of Mr. Trump’s closest allies in Congress, including Mr. Brooks, Mr. Gosar, Mr. Biggs and Ms. Greene, met with him at the White House in December to discuss their willingness to overturn the election results. Lawmakers in attendance described the meeting as quite dry, centered on how the process would play out in the House and Senate.

But Mr. Gosar launched the meeting to his supporters as a call to action, pledging not to “accept the denial of their rights” from those who voted for Mr. Trump.

“This sedition,” he wrote, “Will be arrested.”

Kevin roose contribution to reports.

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Lawmakers may have been exposed to the coronavirus as they took shelter during the Capitol riot, a doctor said.

As they took shelter in a safe place as a crowd of Trump supporters stormed the Capitol on Wednesday, House lawmakers may have been exposed to someone infected with the coronavirus, the coronavirus said on Sunday. Congressional Attending Physician’s Office.

In an email to lawmakers, Dr Brian P. Monahan, the attending physician, said that while “the time spent in this room was several hours for some and shorter for others”, during this period, “People may have been exposed to another occupant with coronavirus infection. He called on lawmakers to get a PCR test as a precaution and continue to take preventative measures against the spread of the virus.

Congress has long struggled to stem the spread of the virus within its ranks, with mixed advice and a delayed testing regime. Dozens of lawmakers, staff and reporters took refuge in the secure room Wednesday, but a handful of Republicans refused to wear masks, one person there said, even as Representative Lisa Blunt Rochester, Democrat of Delaware, was trying to distribute masks.

Before the crowds crossed the Capitol, President Nancy Pelosi of California, overseeing the certification of President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s victory and the debate over a Republican effort to overturn those results in some states, warned Republicans to have too many people on the floor and for some objectors refusing to wear masks while they spoke.

When the 117th Congress resumed a week ago, several lawmakers tested positive for the coronavirus after being sworn in. Late Wednesday, a Republican, Rep. Jake LaTurner of Kansas, received positive test results after voting in the House to overturn Arizona’s results and did not return for a second vote early Thursday. It was unclear where Mr LaTurner was taking refuge in the area as crowds attempted to break into the House bedroom, but in a statement released shortly before 3 a.m. Thursday, his office said he was not experiencing symptoms.

Because lawmakers qualified for early access to the coronavirus vaccine, many received at least one injection of a two-dose vaccine, with some receiving both doses. Some congressional assistants were allowed to receive the vaccine in two doses.

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After pressure from lawmakers, Trump suggests he could take action on the relief bill.

Two governors also said the time for negotiations was over. On “State of the Union,” Michigan Housekeeper Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat, said she has long backed $ 2,000 stimulus checks, but it was too late in the process to make those kinds of requests.

“Sign the bill, get it done, and then if the president wants to push for more, let’s do it too,” said Governor Larry Hogan of Maryland, a Republican who also appeared on the show.

Another governor, Jay Inslee of Washington, said Mr. Trump “chose to hold the entire relief program hostage.” Mr. Inslee, a Democrat, announced on Sunday that the state would provide $ 54 million in funding to nearly 100,000 people who lose their unemployment assistance benefits.

Despite harshly criticizing Mr. Trump, two elected progressive representatives joined the president’s call for increased out-of-pocket payments. On the subject of the “State of the Union”, Jamaal Bowman, Democrat of New York, affirmed that the president “made postures to be made, to bring back like the hero of the American people” after his defeat in November. But like Mr. Trump, he said Americans needed more help.

“It has to be at least $ 2,000, so he has to talk to his Republican buddies and say ‘give the people money,’” said Cori Bush, Democrat of Missouri, who also referred to the figure as 600. dollars of “slap in the face. people in pain.”

Democrats, who have long advocated increasing the amount of financial aid distributed across the country, plan to hold a vote on Monday to approve a stand-alone bill that would increase payments to $ 2,000. It’s unclear whether this legislation will stand a chance in the Senate, where Republicans have long resisted spending more than $ 1 trillion on pandemic relief.

Republican Senator Patrick J. Toomey of Pennsylvania said he would oppose such a measure and urged the president to sign the bill, adding that “time is running out.”

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‘It just needs to be done’: Lawmakers push Trump to sign relief bill.

WASHINGTON – Lawmakers on Sunday urged President Trump to sign a massive $ 900 billion aid package after millions of Americans lost unemployment coverage on Saturday as the President put the fate of the measure in limbo pushing for larger relief checks.

Mr Trump’s resistance to signing the bill risks leaving millions of Americans jobless without crucial benefits, jeopardizing other essential support for businesses and families set to expire at the end of the year and raises the possibility of a government shutdown on Tuesday.

The president blinded lawmakers last week when he called “shameful” a relief compromise that massively passed both houses and was negotiated by his own treasury secretary and administration officials. He hinted he could veto the measure unless lawmakers increase the bill’s $ 600 direct payment checks to $ 2,000, and Mr. Trump, who was largely absent from negotiations on the compromise, doubled down on that criticism on Saturday while offering little clarity on its plans. A White House spokesman declined to say what the president intended to do.

“I just want our great people to get $ 2,000, rather than the meager $ 600 that is now in the bill,” Mr. Trump said on Twitter on Saturdayone day he continued to devote many of his posts to lies about the election. “Also, stop the billions of dollars of ‘pig’.”

If the president does not sign the $ 2.3 trillion spending package, which includes the $ 900 billion in pandemic assistance as well as funding to keep government open last Monday, coverage of two federal programs without jobs that have expanded and extended benefits will end Saturday for millions. unemployed.

“None of us totally liked the bill – it’s the nature of legislating, you’re not going to end up with something perfect – but we passed it because it was the agreed number.” , said Rep. Adam Kinzinger, Republican of Illinois. Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union”. “I don’t understand what’s being done, why, unless it’s just to create chaos and show power and be upset because you lost the election. Otherwise, I don’t understand because it has to be done.

Several lawmakers, including Independent Senator Bernie Sanders from Vermont, have said Mr Trump should not delay signing the pending law in his Mar-a-Lago estate and instead approve a separate bill providing for checks for $ 2,000.

“What the president is doing right now is incredibly cruel,” Mr. Sanders told ABC’s “This Week”. “Given the terrible economic crisis this country is facing, yes, we must pay every working class individual in this country $ 2,000, $ 500 for their child. But you can’t take care of the bill.

Two governors also said the time for negotiations was over. In a “State of the Union” appearance, Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat, said she has long supported $ 2,000 stimulus checks to Americans, but it was too late in the process to make these kinds of requests.

“Sign the bill, get it done, and then if the president wants to push for more, let’s do it too,” said Governor Larry Hogan of Maryland, a Republican who also appeared on the show.

Although they harshly criticized Mr. Trump, two progressive elected officials also called for an increase in out-of-pocket payments. On the subject of the “State of the Union”, Jamaal Bowman, Democrat of New York, affirmed that the president “made postures to be made, to bring back like the hero of the American people” after his defeat in November. But like Mr. Trump, he said Americans needed more help.

“It has to be at least $ 2,000, so he has to talk to his Republican buddies and say ‘give the people money,’” said Cori Bush, Democrat of Missouri, who also referred to the figure as 600. dollars of “slap in the face. people in pain.”

Democrats, who have long advocated increasing the amount of financial aid distributed across the country, plan to hold a vote on Monday to approve a stand-alone bill that would increase payments to $ 2,000. But it’s unclear whether this legislation will stand a chance in the Senate, where Republicans have long resisted spending more than $ 1 trillion on pandemic relief.

Republican Senator Patrick J. Toomey of Pennsylvania said on Fox News Sunday that he would oppose such a measure and urged the president to sign the bill, adding that “time is running out.”

“I understand he wants to be remembered for advocating for big checks,” Toomey said. “But the danger is that he will be remembered for the chaos, misery and erratic behavior if he lets this expire.

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Lawmakers urge Trump to sign relief bill.

WASHINGTON – Lawmakers on Sunday urged President Trump to sign a massive $ 900 billion aid package after millions of Americans lost unemployment coverage on Saturday as the President put the fate of the measure in limbo pushing for larger relief checks.

Mr Trump’s resistance to signing the bill risks leaving millions of Americans jobless without crucial benefits, jeopardizing other essential support for businesses and families set to expire at the end of the year and raises the possibility of a government shutdown on Tuesday.

The president blinded lawmakers last week when he called “shameful” a relief compromise that massively passed both houses and was negotiated by his own treasury secretary and administration officials. He hinted he could veto the measure unless lawmakers increase the bill’s $ 600 direct payment checks to $ 2,000, and Mr. Trump, who was largely absent from negotiations on the compromise, doubled down on that criticism on Saturday while offering little clarity on its plans. A White House spokesman declined to say what the president intended to do.

“I just want our great people to get $ 2,000, rather than the meager $ 600 that is now in the bill,” Mr. Trump said on Twitter on Saturdayone day he continued to devote many of his posts to lies about the election. “Also, stop the billions of dollars of ‘pig’.”

If the president does not sign the $ 2.3 trillion spending package, which includes the $ 900 billion in pandemic assistance as well as funding to keep government open last Monday, coverage of two federal programs without jobs that have expanded and extended benefits will end Saturday for millions. unemployed.

“None of us totally liked the bill – it’s the nature of legislating, you’re not going to end up with something perfect – but we passed it because it was the agreed number.” , said Rep. Adam Kinzinger, Republican of Illinois. Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union”. “I don’t understand what’s being done, why, unless it’s just to create chaos and show power and be upset because you lost the election. Otherwise, I don’t understand because it has to be done.

Several lawmakers, including Independent Senator Bernie Sanders from Vermont, have said Mr Trump should not delay signing the pending law in his Mar-a-Lago estate and instead approve a separate bill providing for checks for $ 2,000.

“What the president is doing right now is incredibly cruel,” Mr. Sanders told ABC’s “This Week”. “Given the terrible economic crisis this country is facing, yes, we must pay every working class individual in this country $ 2,000, $ 500 for their child. But you can’t take care of the bill.

Two governors also said the time for negotiations was over. In a “State of the Union” appearance, Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat, said she has long supported $ 2,000 stimulus checks to Americans, but it was too late in the process to make these kinds of requests.

“Sign the bill, get it done, and then if the president wants to push for more, let’s do it too,” said Governor Larry Hogan of Maryland, a Republican who also appeared on the show.

Although they harshly criticized Mr. Trump, two progressive elected officials also called for an increase in out-of-pocket payments. On the subject of the “State of the Union”, Jamaal Bowman, Democrat of New York, affirmed that the president “made postures to be made, to bring back like the hero of the American people” after his defeat in November. But like Mr. Trump, he said Americans needed more help.

“It has to be at least $ 2,000, so he has to talk to his Republican buddies and say ‘give the people money,’” said Cori Bush, Democrat of Missouri, who also referred to the figure as 600. dollars of “slap in the face. people in pain.”

Democrats, who have long advocated increasing the amount of financial aid distributed across the country, plan to hold a vote on Monday to approve a stand-alone bill that would increase payments to $ 2,000. But it’s unclear whether this legislation will stand a chance in the Senate, where Republicans have long resisted spending more than $ 1 trillion on pandemic relief.

Republican Senator Patrick J. Toomey of Pennsylvania said on Fox News Sunday that he would oppose such a measure and urged the president to sign the bill, adding that “time is running out.”

“I understand he wants to be remembered for advocating for big checks,” Toomey said. “But the danger is that he will be remembered for the chaos, misery and erratic behavior if he lets this expire.