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How a presidential rally turned into a Capitol fury

When President Trump swore at the election results on Wednesday from a stage near the White House, his followers were already gathering on Capitol Hill. Soon they would storm it. We analyzed a crucial two-hour period to reconstruct how a rally gave way to a crowd that almost came face to face with Congress.






Supporters already

at the Capitol

Partisans marching towards the Capitol

Supporters already

at the Capitol

Partisans marching towards the Capitol

Supporters already

at the Capitol

Supporters marching

at the Capitol

Supporters already

at the Capitol

Supporters marching

at the Capitol


The day’s events were captured by protesters and bystanders who broadcast the action live or posted the scenes on social media. The footage shows the simultaneous and alternating perspectives of Mr. Trump on the podium, lawmakers inside Capitol Hill, and the growing number – and growing violence – of rioters on the ground.

Before noon

A brewing storm


President Trump is preparing to take the stage.


Supporters gather at the Capitol.

For weeks, Mr. Trump had urged his supporters to travel to Washington to stop certification of election results, and several concurrent rallies were scheduled for Wednesday.

As the morning arrives, hundreds of people gather on the Capitol Lawn, over a mile from where Trump will soon be speaking near the White House. Among them, the Proud Boys, a far-right group, identifiable here by their orange hats.


11:50 a.m.. East side of the Capitol


Amanda Andrade-Rhoades / For The Washington Post via Getty Images

At the same time, near the White House, Donald Trump Jr. films the president and his entourage behind the scenes before his father’s speech. In a video uploaded to her Facebook page, they listen to the song “Gloria” and marvel at the size of the crowd.

11:54 a.m. South of the White House

Donald Trump Jr. via Facebook

12:15 p.m. to 12:50 p.m.

Capitol crowds are growing


Trump calls for marching on Capitol Hill.


A large crowd is heading in that direction.

About 15 minutes into his speech, Mr. Trump told rally attendees to walk to Capitol Hill. “You have to show strength,” he said.

Currently, the Capitol grounds are protected by temporary perimeter fences and few officers are equipped to defend them.

12:17 p.m. South of the White House

American network pool

Supporters leave the rally continuously before the end of Mr. Trump’s speech and make their way to the Capitol.

12:29 pm Constitution Ave.

Talia Jane via Twitter

When they arrive, another crowd of Trump supporters who have already gathered along the western perimeter fence becomes more agitated.

12:49 pm West of Capitol Park

Coup d’etat via Storyful

Around this time, a homemade bomb was reported in the Republican National Committee building, just one block from the Capitol. Shortly after, another device was discovered nearby at the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee.






Explosives reported

in party buildings

Explosives reported

in party buildings


12:53 p.m. to 1:15 p.m.

First obstacles cleared


Trump continues to speak.


Rioters knock down a fence west of the Capitol.


Congress begins the joint session.

About 20 minutes before the end of Trump’s speech, some people in the Capitol crowd harass the officers stationed at the barricades and start to get physical. Others follow suit, until they violently overwhelm the police and cross the outer perimeter of the building.

12:53 Northwest side of the Capitol

Elijah Schaffer via Twitter

The crowd quickly broke through three more barricades, forcing the officers back to the west steps of the Capitol.






12:53

First barricades violated

Supporters marching

of the Trump rally

1:00 p.m. Joint session of

The congress meets in

House bedroom

12:53

First barricades violated

Supporters marching

of the Trump rally

1:00 p.m. Joint session of

The congress meets in

House bedroom

Supporters

walking

at the Capitol

1

12:53 The first barricades have been crossed.

2

1:00 p.m. The joint session of Congress meets in the chamber of the House.


Once on the steps, the group encountered a small contingent of officers. After a few minutes, Capitol police in riot gear arrive to help control the crowd.

12:58 West side of the Capitol

Coup d’etat via Storyful

At that time, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi begins work to certify the Electoral College’s vote in a joint session of Congress, alongside Vice President Mike Pence.

Outside, the chants begin: “Whose house? Our house!”

1:12 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Trump’s call to action


Trump calls again for a march on Capitol Hill.


Mob continues to confront the police.


Ted Cruz opposes certification.

As Mr. Trump’s speech draws to a close, he calls on his supporters to “walk down Pennsylvania Avenue” towards the Capitol. The rioters continue to clash violently with the police, including local police reinforcements who arrived at the scene. Both sides spray chemical agents.

1:15 p.m. West side of the Capitol

Coup d’état via Storyful

Inside the Capitol, members of Congress seem unaware of the extent of the violence outside. The House and Senate moved to their separate chambers to debate certification of the vote. Texas Republican Senator Ted Cruz argues the Senate should not certify Arizona electoral votes.

A minute later, Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund requests immediate assistance from the DC National Guard. Outside, rioters tear up scaffolding in front of the northwest steps of the Capitol and approach the building.


1:50 p.m. West side of the Capitol


Lev Radin / Pacific Press / LightRocket via Getty Images

Around 2 p.m.

Assault on the east side


Groups pass through police barricades.


Amy Klobuchar and other lawmakers debate.

On the east side of the Capitol, where the police presence is much less, another crowd is about to reach the doors of the building.






Around 2:00 p.m.

Police barricades

are violated

East Coast

Lawmakers continue to

debate in both chambers

Around 2:00 p.m.

Police barricades

are violated

East Coast

Lawmakers continue to

debate in both chambers

1

Around 2:00 p.m. Police barricades are breached on the east side

2

Lawmakers continue to debate in both chambers

3

Mob continues to riot


Police remove a barricade at the northeast corner of the building after heavy clashes between police and crowds.

1:58 p.m. Northeast side of the Capitol

Marcus DiPaola via TikTok

A live stream on YouTube captures the exact moment when a massive crowd also walks through a separate and larger barricade on the east side. It is the last physical barrier protecting this side of the Capitol.

2:00 p.m. East side of the Capitol

Stephen Ignoramus via YouTube

2:10 p.m.

Mob reaches the gates on the west side


The group crosses the barricades on the west side.


Lawmakers are continuing the debate.

Back on the northwest side of the Capitol, another YouTube livestream captures the crowds chasing officers on the steps and crossing the last barrier on that side.

2:10 p.m. Northwest side of the Capitol

John Sullivan via YouTube

Violent clashes with the police have lasted for over an hour when the crowd finally bursts in.

Crowds approach an entrance near the Senate Chamber, a lower floor where Senators continue to debate.






2:10 p.m.

Group violations

the last barrier

East Coast

barricades

already violated

Lawmakers continue to

debate in both chambers

2:10 p.m.

Group violations

the last barrier

East Coast

barricades

already violated

1:00 p.m. Senators

continue to debate in

the bedroom of the House.

Lawmakers continue to

debate in both chambers

East Coast

barricades

already

violated

1

2:10 p.m. The group crosses the last barrier on the west side

2

Lawmakers continue to debate


Rioters surround the building on both sides, but there is no indication that lawmakers inside know the extent of the breach. As the crowd approaches the doors of the Senate wing, Senator Kyrsten Sinema, Democrat of Arizona, urges her colleagues to “reject this baseless challenge and uphold the will of the voters of Arizona.”

Around 2:11 p.m. to 2:16 p.m.

Rioters enter the building


Mob enters the building.


Senators continue the debate a few steps away.

Rioters from the west side entered the building at around 2:11 pm Two minutes later, as they reached the stairs next to the Senate Chamber, the Senate was called to recess.

Rioters continue to flow into the building. They enter through a door and a broken window on the northwest side.

2:15 p.m. Northwest side of the Capitol

John Sullivan via YouTube

Rioters chase an officer to the top of a staircase where there are entrances to the Senate Chamber in both directions.

2:14 pm Inside the Capitol

Igor Bobic / HuffPost via Storyful

The officer leads the rioters one way, and the save arrives – while the police inside the chamber are still trying to lock the doors.






AMERICAN CAPITOL

Second floor

2:14 p.m.

Mob gets to the top of

stairs near the Senate

entrance to the room

Mob faces

with the officers

2:13 p.m.

The Senate is leaving

in recreation

2:11 p.m.

Mob pierces

Doors and windows

first floor

Grounds of the Capitol and

National shopping center

AMERICAN CAPITOL

Second floor

Grounds of the Capitol and

National shopping center

1

2:11 p.m. Mob smashes the doors and windows of the first floor

2

2:13 p.m. The Senate goes into suspension

3

2:14 p.m. Mob arrives at the top of the stairs near the entrance to the Senate chamber

4

Mob confronts officers


Now the rioters stand with the police in the lobby, a few steps from the entrance to the Senate Chamber. Senators are still spinning indoors.


2:16 p.m. Room outside the Senate Chamber


Win Mcnamee / Getty Images

After the breach

The siege continues


Thousands reach the Capitol.


Congress is shut down.

More than five minutes after the first rioters entered the building, the Chamber also went into suspension. Now the police are running into the crowds inside the building as some members of Congress are able to evacuate. Others are trapped inside as rioters pound on doors.

Outside the building, the crowd grows as attendees of President Trump’s rally continue to flow. The crowd becomes more violent, dragging and beating the officers.

Three hours will pass before the Sergeant-at-Arms declares the building secure.


2:19 p.m. Near the Capitol park on the west side


Jim Lo Scalzo / EPA, via Shutterstock

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Georgia Republicans seek to cover themselves in Trump’s fury over loss

“You are here because we the people will not let them steal our vote!” Mr Wood, a prominent right-wing Atlanta lawyer, told the jubilant crowd. “We won’t let them steal our freedom. Every lie will be revealed! And on January 20, 2021, Donald J. Trump will be sworn in as President of the United States of America.

Mr Wood subsequently addressed state officials saying the Georgia process was too corrupt to participate. “We’re not going to vote on your damn China-made machines,” he said. Ms Powell, who has been disowned by Mr Trump’s legal team but continues to launch legal challenges on behalf of the president, echoes Mr. Wood’s warning, urging “all Georgians” not to vote “unless your vote is secure”.

But in another way, the momentum seemed to backfire on Mr. Trump this week. On Tuesday, a senior state election official, Gabriel Sterling, bonded with the president, begging him to curb conspiratorial rhetoric that Mr Sterling said inspired people to make violent threats against election workers.

Mr Sterling’s boss Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger – like Mr Sterling, a Republican – on Wednesday appeared to shut the door on the president’s distant hopes of overturning the people’s vote. Noting that the United States Attorney General, William P. Barr, had just said that the Department of Justice had found no widespread fraud in the national race, Mr. Raffensperger said: “Neither did our investigators more widespread fraud.

He added that a second recount of Georgia’s ballots, which is expected to be completed by midnight on Wednesday, would show Mr. Biden was indeed the winner. And the Secretary of State notably called Mr. Biden the president-elect.

At the same time, political opportunism is an important factor. Mr Raffensperger, who is due for re-election in 2022, is one of many leading Georgian Republicans to bend their actions to two competing imperatives: upholding the integrity of their state’s election while trying to survive the weather bizarre and evolving politics. systems generated by the mercurial Mr. Trump.

The president may well spring from conspiracy theories and acrimony – he has publicly attacked Mr. Raffensperger and Mr. Kemp for failing to comply with his wishes – but he is also the most popular figure in the Republican Party. Nationally, Mr. Trump’s sustained attack on the integrity of the vote, while bogus, persuaded many Republicans that there was something wrong with the election. And no one knows if, or for how long, he will continue to command the loyalty of his party.

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In Pennsylvania, Trump Voter Fury Predicts Nation Still Divided

PITTSBURGH – Like many Trump supporters, Dennis Tippie watched the steady tally of votes that wiped out the president’s advance in Pennsylvania, not with the belief that democracy was being played out, but with grim and growing anger.

“If he ends up with this number of electoral votes,” he told Joseph R. Biden Jr. last week, as Mr. Biden appeared en route to winning the state and the White House, “he would have won them by fraud, deception and simple criminality. ”

There is no evidence of fraud, deception or criminality in the counting of the postal votes that accumulated during the worst health crisis to hit the country in a century. The state’s Republican-controlled legislature has refused to allow processing of those ballots upon arrival, compounding delays until the race is called on Saturday, making Mr Biden the 46th president-elect.

But Mr. Tippie, a retired truck driver who absorbed the president’s words in part via Fox News, agreed with Mr. Trump and his surrogates that the election was stolen in front of their eyes. He lives in Nanty Glo, Pennsylvania, inside the state that so-called Philadelphia elites sometimes refer to as “Pennsyltucky.” For Mr. Tippie, Mr. Biden is “a total jerk,” his running mate, Kamala Harris, is “a very scary woman,” and a Biden presidency would be both illegitimate and disastrous.

But, he said, “I am not resigning myself to him being president.

While Mr. Biden has had major successes in turning Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania back to the Democrats, and succeeded in the rare ouster of an incumbent, he did not mark the crushing demolition of Mr. Trump to which de many Democrats had aspired, despite leading the popular vote of over four million.

Instead, Mr. Biden will inherit a country where many Americans are already supported in mutually hostile corners. It threatens the President-elect’s most fundamental campaign pledge: to unite Americans, to overcome divisions as a government strategy, to heal “the soul of the nation.”

“I think we are a long way from unifying the country, and I am sure Trump will continue to work to divide us,” said Catherine Lalonde, Democratic Party chairperson from Butler County, a blue-collar region in the western Pennsylvania.

“I don’t think his supporters will accept Biden’s victory and wouldn’t even do it if it were a bigger margin,” she added. “I have a feeling all of the Trump flags and signs will stay put until they fall apart.”

Interviews with Pennsylvania voters, mostly Trump supporters, showed that Pennsylvania reflects a nation still mired in tribal polarization. The country is perhaps ahead as deeply divided as ever.

Many of the president’s supporters were swayed by his blizzard of disinformation that illegal voting was rampant and election officials suppressed a Trump victory. They envision a democratic White House that bow to leftists, abandon the fight against China, and encourage rioters and looters.

While Mr. Biden has done a little better in the many Trump counties of Pennsylvania than Hillary Clinton did in 2016, the margins haven’t tightened as much as Democrats had expected or hoped. With a record turnout approaching 7 million in the state, Mr Biden’s advantage over Mr Trump was less than 1 percentage point on Saturday night – a far cry from Barack Obama’s wins of over 10 points in 2008 and more than five in 2012.

Certainly, there were Trump voters willing to accept the results as fair and move forward.

Chace Torres, 37, was making grilled cheese sandwiches for his family in Northampton County on Thursday night. At the time, Mr. Trump’s lead in the state, once close to 700,000, was shrinking as the ballots mailed were counted.

“I think the Trump supporters are going to suck it up and move on,” said Mr. Torres, a railway union. “We’re not going to miss tomorrow to loot and riot. We will bow our heads, go to work, feed our children, take care of the country as we always do. “

But others have not been swayed by Mr Biden’s calls for unity after four years of division.

Jessica Bell, a Trump voter in the suburbs of Philadelphia, said, “We are locked up and loaded” because she sees the country heading into civil disorder.

“I have my television on the news 24/7,” Ms. Bell said. “I have my phone in hand to follow social networks. I have slept about six hours since Monday. I watched very, very closely.

She cited reports on social media and Fox News to support her belief that the election was hijacked: Black Sharpies given to Arizona voters made the ballots invalid; Republican poll observers in Philadelphia were not allowed to see the tally; Nancy Pelosi controls the company that supplies electoral machines to Nevada.

These accusations, some raised by the Trump campaign and the president himself, are distortions or mere plots. Arizona election officials, for example, said the Black Sharpies did not invalidate a ballot and that a judge allowed observers in Philadelphia to be within six feet of the polling poll.

But Ms Bell, 32, who quit her job this summer as an assistant in a doctor’s office, insisted that “Americans are being silenced” and baselessly accused: “It’s a blow. of state.

Some Democrats hoped that with Mr. Trump removed from office, the nation would return to some semblance of normalcy, that divisiveness as government policy would end.

In Erie County, which Mr. Trump won in 2016 after long voting Democratic, the president raised expectations and hopes with his pledges to restore the industry. But Mr. Trump lost Erie County this year, in part because of his mismanagement of the coronavirus pandemic and the chaos it has wreaked, said Carl Anderson III, a Democrat on the county council.

“Its flaws have been exposed,” Mr. Anderson said. “There are elements of extremists and ideologists who initially will not accept the outcome and may be able to protest, but as the dust settles and reality emerges, normalcy takes over.

The nature of Mr. Biden’s narrow victory in Pennsylvania underscored the challenges he will now face. His vote count was prompted by a surge of suburban voters: he improved Ms Clinton’s 2016 margins in the voice-rich counties surrounding Philadelphia by notable margins, including more than 7 percentage points in the county. of Chester and nearly five points in Montgomery County, the third most populous in the state.

But in Red Pennsylvania – a vast strip stretching from northeast to center to southwest – Mr. Trump has ceded very little ground. It has swept over most of the rural counties and small towns, with their faded industrial economies, through landslides. This suggests that the message behind Trumpism – a combination of promised industrial restoration and white grievances – has lost none of its appeal.

“People here still feel left out,” said Rob Gleason, a former state Republican Party chairman who lives in Johnstown, once a steel-making hub, now bleeding and struggling. “I can’t tell you how many people are saying that Trump is saying what I’ve been thinking my whole life.

Cambria County, which includes Johnstown, replaced Mr Trump with 37 points four years ago. This year, the county favored it by an identical margin.

“Trump’s support here in rural counties and the West will last two years,” Gleason said.

He predicted that with Mr. Biden in the White House, Republican senators would block him at every turn, with a view to winning seats midway through 2022.

“You know the Senate won’t give him a thumbs up,” he said.

Democrats’ views of Trump supporters over the past five years have been driven in part by journalist trips to places like Johnstown, once a Democratic stronghold. Many Democrats see the president’s base as enslaved to an authoritarian, energized by his racism and xenophobia, and unable to separate reality from his endless lies.

Many Trump supporters, in turn, do not have a more generous view of Biden’s voters. “Most of them are morons,” said Lois Peters, a retired saleswoman at a Westmoreland County department store.

She was baffled that Biden voters couldn’t see what she is doing, that the former vice president is mentally unfit to lead, and that a liberal and permissive Biden administration would lead to violence and looting, as following some demonstrations against police shootings. and the mistreatment of black people this spring.

“This vice president of Biden, oh my god, that woman is vicious,” Ms Peters said of Ms Harris. Then she surprised herself. “Now I look vicious,” she said. She continued, “But I feel like what I’m doing.”

Mary Jo DePalma, 60, who owns a jewelry store in Westmoreland County with her husband, said Democrats “seemed to hate the president so much” that she feared even Mr Biden’s victory would end their animosity to the right. “It will take a miracle to heal the nation,” she said. “I believe it started a long time ago, not just over the past three years.”

“I hope that in two years I am completely wrong,” she added. “I want the country to be united. I want to continue to have faith in America.”

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In Pennsylvania, Trump Voter Fury Predicts Nation Still Divided

PITTSBURGH – Like many Trump supporters, Dennis Tippie watched the steady tally of votes that wiped out the president’s advance in Pennsylvania, not with the belief that democracy was being played out, but with grim and growing anger.

“If he ends up with this number of electoral votes,” he told Joseph R. Biden Jr. last week, as Mr. Biden appeared en route to winning the state and the White House, “he would have won them by fraud, deception and simple criminality. ”

There is no evidence of fraud, deception or criminality in the counting of the postal votes that accumulated during the worst health crisis to hit the country in a century. The state’s Republican-controlled legislature has refused to allow processing of those ballots upon arrival, compounding delays until the race is called on Saturday, making Mr Biden the 46th president-elect.

But Mr. Tippie, a retired truck driver who absorbed the president’s words in part via Fox News, agreed with Mr. Trump and his surrogates that the election was stolen in front of their eyes. He lives in Nanty Glo, Pennsylvania, inside the state that so-called Philadelphia elites sometimes refer to as “Pennsyltucky.” For Mr. Tippie, Mr. Biden is “a total jerk,” his running mate, Kamala Harris, is “a very scary woman,” and a Biden presidency would be both illegitimate and disastrous.

But, he said, “I am not resigning myself to him being president.

While Mr. Biden has had major successes in turning Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania back to the Democrats, and succeeded in the rare ouster of an incumbent, he did not mark the crushing demolition of Mr. Trump to which de many Democrats had aspired, despite leading the popular vote of over four million.

Instead, Mr. Biden will inherit a country where many Americans are already supported in mutually hostile corners. It threatens the President-elect’s most fundamental campaign pledge: to unite Americans, to overcome divisions as a government strategy, to heal “the soul of the nation.”

“I think we are a long way from unifying the country, and I am sure Trump will continue to work to divide us,” said Catherine Lalonde, Democratic Party chairperson from Butler County, a blue-collar region in the western Pennsylvania.

“I don’t think his supporters will accept Biden’s victory and wouldn’t even do it if it were a bigger margin,” she added. “I have a feeling all of the Trump flags and signs will stay put until they fall apart.”

Interviews with Pennsylvania voters, mostly Trump supporters, showed that Pennsylvania reflects a nation still mired in tribal polarization. The country is perhaps ahead as deeply divided as ever.

Many of the president’s supporters were swayed by his blizzard of disinformation that illegal voting was rampant and election officials suppressed a Trump victory. They envision a democratic White House that bow to leftists, abandon the fight against China, and encourage rioters and looters.

While Mr. Biden has done a little better in the many Trump counties of Pennsylvania than Hillary Clinton did in 2016, the margins haven’t tightened as much as Democrats had expected or hoped. With a record turnout approaching 7 million in the state, Mr Biden’s advantage over Mr Trump was less than 1 percentage point on Saturday night – a far cry from Barack Obama’s wins of over 10 points in 2008 and more than five in 2012.

Certainly, there were Trump voters willing to accept the results as fair and move forward.

Chace Torres, 37, was making grilled cheese sandwiches for his family in Northampton County on Thursday night. At the time, Mr. Trump’s lead in the state, once close to 700,000, was shrinking as the ballots mailed were counted.

“I think the Trump supporters are going to suck it up and move on,” said Mr. Torres, a railway union. “We’re not going to miss tomorrow to loot and riot. We will bow our heads, go to work, feed our children, take care of the country as we always do. “

But others have not been swayed by Mr Biden’s calls for unity after four years of division.

Jessica Bell, a Trump voter in the suburbs of Philadelphia, said, “We are locked up and loaded” because she sees the country heading into civil disorder.

“I have my television on the news 24/7,” Ms. Bell said. “I have my phone in hand to follow social networks. I have slept about six hours since Monday. I watched very, very closely.

She cited reports on social media and Fox News to support her belief that the election was hijacked: Black Sharpies given to Arizona voters made the ballots invalid; Republican poll observers in Philadelphia were not allowed to see the tally; Nancy Pelosi controls the company that supplies electoral machines to Nevada.

These accusations, some raised by the Trump campaign and the president himself, are distortions or mere plots. Arizona election officials, for example, said the Black Sharpies did not invalidate a ballot and that a judge allowed observers in Philadelphia to be within six feet of the polling poll.

But Ms Bell, 32, who quit her job this summer as an assistant in a doctor’s office, insisted that “Americans are being silenced” and baselessly accused: “It’s a blow. of state.

Some Democrats hoped that with Mr. Trump removed from office, the nation would return to some semblance of normalcy, that divisiveness as government policy would end.

In Erie County, which Mr. Trump won in 2016 after long voting Democratic, the president raised expectations and hopes with his pledges to restore the industry. But Mr. Trump lost Erie County this year, in part because of his mismanagement of the coronavirus pandemic and the chaos it has wreaked, said Carl Anderson III, a Democrat on the county council.

“Its flaws have been exposed,” Mr. Anderson said. “There are elements of extremists and ideologists who initially will not accept the outcome and may be able to protest, but as the dust settles and reality emerges, normalcy takes over.

The nature of Mr. Biden’s narrow victory in Pennsylvania underscored the challenges he will now face. His vote count was prompted by a surge of suburban voters: he improved Ms Clinton’s 2016 margins in the voice-rich counties surrounding Philadelphia by notable margins, including more than 7 percentage points in the county. of Chester and nearly five points in Montgomery County, the third most populous in the state.

But in Red Pennsylvania – a vast strip stretching from northeast to center to southwest – Mr. Trump has ceded very little ground. It has swept over most of the rural counties and small towns, with their faded industrial economies, through landslides. This suggests that the message behind Trumpism – a combination of promised industrial restoration and white grievances – has lost none of its appeal.

“People here still feel left out,” said Rob Gleason, a former state Republican Party chairman who lives in Johnstown, once a steel-making hub, now bleeding and struggling. “I can’t tell you how many people are saying that Trump is saying what I’ve been thinking my whole life.

Cambria County, which includes Johnstown, replaced Mr Trump with 37 points four years ago. This year, the county favored it by an identical margin.

“Trump’s support here in rural counties and the West will last two years,” Gleason said.

He predicted that with Mr. Biden in the White House, Republican senators would block him at every turn, with a view to winning seats midway through 2022.

“You know the Senate won’t give him a thumbs up,” he said.

Democrats’ views of Trump supporters over the past five years have been driven in part by journalist trips to places like Johnstown, once a Democratic stronghold. Many Democrats see the president’s base as enslaved to an authoritarian, energized by his racism and xenophobia, and unable to separate reality from his endless lies.

Many Trump supporters, in turn, do not have a more generous view of Biden’s voters. “Most of them are morons,” said Lois Peters, a retired saleswoman at a Westmoreland County department store.

She was baffled that Biden voters couldn’t see what she is doing, that the former vice president is mentally unfit to lead, and that a liberal and permissive Biden administration would lead to violence and looting, as following some demonstrations against police shootings. and the mistreatment of black people this spring.

“This vice president of Biden, oh my god, that woman is vicious,” Ms Peters said of Ms Harris. Then she surprised herself. “Now I look vicious,” she said. She continued, “But I feel like what I’m doing.”

Mary Jo DePalma, 60, who owns a jewelry store in Westmoreland County with her husband, said Democrats “seemed to hate the president so much” that she feared even Mr Biden’s victory would end their animosity to the right. “It will take a miracle to heal the nation,” she said. “I believe it started a long time ago, not just over the past three years.”

“I hope that in two years I am completely wrong,” she added. “I want the country to be united. I want to continue to have faith in America.”

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Travel News

Amid Democratic fury, Republicans push Barrett to the brink of confirmation

Struggles between supporters over the direction of federal courts have escalated rapidly in recent years, as Congress has stopped legislating regularly and both sides have increasingly turned to the courts to enforce their visions for the country.

But the Confirmation Wars appeared to be heading for a new bitter low on Monday. For the first time in recent memory, no member of the minority party, in this case the Democrats, was to vote for confirmation. Only one Democrat, Joe Manchin III of West Virginia, supported Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh in 2018.

Democrats ideologically oppose Judge Barrett, but their opposition has little to do with the candidate herself. With more than 50 million votes already cast, Democrats have insisted the election winner should be allowed to take the seat. They accused Republicans of rank hypocrisy for rushing to fill him despite prior assurances from several senior Republicans that they would not do so if a post became vacant in an election year and despite Republicans’ insistence in 2016 so that voters have a say in who sits.

Ms Collins and Ms Murkowski, two moderates who have frequently resisted their party, shared the concerns, warning that filling the seat now will erode the legitimacy of the court and the Senate.

At 48, Judge Barrett would be the youngest judge on the bench, set to make his mark on the law for decades to come. A Chicago Court of Appeals judge and Notre Dame law professor, she has been presented as the heir to former Judge Antonin Scalia, a dominant figure in the court’s conservative wing for decades. Judge Barrett was commissioned for Judge Scalia and shares his strict judicial philosophy.

In her confirmation hearings this month, Judge Barrett repeatedly described herself as a true independent with “no agenda.” None of the parties in the Senate, however, appear to believe she will be anything more than a reliable Conservative vote based on her academic writings and court appeals rulings. If this holds true, Justice Barrett would be the ideological opposite of her predecessor, Justice Ginsburg, who was the leader of the now-diminished Liberal wing of the Court.

Democrats used this prospect to ignite their Liberal base ahead of election day. In addition to their concern over the fate of the Affordable Care Act, they spent weeks warning that Judge Barrett was going to cut or nullify abortion rights enshrined in Roe v. Wade.