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Grubhub to deliver Girl Scout cookies amid pandemic

Drawing inspiration from the battered restaurant industry during the coronavirus pandemic, Girl Scouts across the United States announced this week that they will be offering contactless delivery and pickup of their cookies through Grubhub.

This is the first time that Girl Scouts, who have sold cookies for more than a century, have worked with a national delivery service, the organization said.

For decades, cookie stalls, stacked with boxes of Samoas, Thins and Clovers, have been ubiquitous outside of supermarkets and other high traffic areas. So, have direct sales pitches from the Girl Scouts parents to their co-workers.

But then the pandemic struck – severely limiting direct contact. So Girl Scouts got creative.

“We are proud of the ingenious way Girl Scouts run their cookie business safely and use their income to make the world a better place,” Girl Scouts Acting Executive Director Judith Batty said in a statement. “This season our daughters will continue to exemplify what the Cookie Program taught them: how to think like entrepreneurs, use innovative sales tactics and move on to new ways of doing business when things don’t go as planned. . “

Cookie sales were already underway last year when the global pandemic was declared, which the organization says prompted many Girl Scouts to adjust their strategies. Some have set up virtual cookie stands on social media, while others have shipped orders or set up drive-through collection sites, the organization said.

The Girl Scouts said online orders would begin February 1, with Grubhub making deliveries in select markets. Additional markets will be introduced during the cookie selling season, which typically runs from January through April.

The Girl Scouts said Grubhub had agreed to waive all fees it and competitors like Uber Eats and DoorDash typically charge restaurants. The fees have become a source of complaints within the industry.

A representative for Grubhub said Wednesday evening that the company was not immediately ready to comment.

Girl Scouts members will track and process orders and manage inventory using Grubhub’s back-end technology, the organization said. To promote the partnership, Girl Scouts said Grubhub will be offering free shipping on cookie orders of at least $ 15 until February 14. Orders can be placed on Grubhub’s website or on its delivery app.

Consumers who are new to a Girl Scout can search for local troops that sell cookies by entering their zip codes on the National Girl Scout website starting February 1. They can also buy cookies to donate to local rescue workers and other charitable groups.

Along with the announcement of contactless delivery, Girl Scouts have introduced a new variety of cookies – Toast-Yay !, inspired by French toast and dipped in icing – which will be sold in select regions this year.

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Georgia Republicans deliver lingering message: fear Democrats

NORCROSS, Georgia – The biggest applause in Sen. Kelly Loeffler’s brutal speech doesn’t concern Ms Loeffler at all.

When the crowd is most engaged, including Thursday morning at a community pavilion in suburban Atlanta, Loeffler invokes President Trump or attacks his Democratic opponents as socialists and Marxists. Its own political platforms are rarely mentioned.

“Are you ready to keep fighting for President Trump and show America that Georgia is a Red State?” Mrs. Loeffler said when she took the microphone. “We are the firewall to stop socialism and we must hold the line.”

These are the themes of the closing arguments in the second round of the Georgia Senate, which reflected the partisanship and polarization of the national political environment. Ms Loeffler and her Senate colleague David Perdue seek to motivate a Tory base that is still loyal to Mr Trump while picking up some of the defectors who helped hand Georgia over to a Democratic presidential candidate for the first time since 1992.

Democrats are eager to prove that Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s victory over President Trump in Georgia was more than a fluke, and that the state is ready to embrace their party’s more progressive political agenda, rather than to oppose Trumpness alone.

But the race is also emblematic of the current political messages of each party. Jon Ossoff and Reverend Raphael Warnock, the Democratic Senate candidates, presented an array of policy proposals that mix the common priorities of the moderate center and the progressive left: passing a new voting rights law, expanding Medicaid without supporting a single payer system, investment in clean energy while stopping before the Green New Deal, and criminal justice reform that does not include cutting funding to police.

Republicans are not looking for such a calibration. Mr Perdue, who announced Thursday he would be quarantined after coming into contact with someone who had tested positive for the coronavirus, and Ms Loeffler believe their loyalists are more motivated by what their candidates oppose than by what they defend.

There are signs that this approach has resonated with many Republican voters. At Ms Loeffler’s event in Norcross, and later at a New Years Eve concert in Gainesville, voters said their top priorities were to support Mr Trump and his allegations of voter fraud and push back the perceived excesses of the Liberals and their candidates.

“The most important factor for me is to stop socialism,” said Melinda Weeks, a 62-year-old voter who lives in Gwinnett County. “I don’t want to see our country become the Chinese Communist Party.”

John Wright, 64, said he voted for Ms Loeffler and Mr Perdue, but believes Republicans need to do a better job reaching out to minority voters. He cited the change in racial makeup that continued rapidly in Georgia and fueled Democrats’ chances of winning statewide seats.

“Republicans have to figure out how to help these people, how to reach these people,” Wright said. “These demographics are changing and you can’t just present the American Dream to people who haven’t been able to achieve the American Dream.”

The statewide jockey comes at a tumultuous time in Georgia politics, as Mr. Trump continues to shake up Senate races with his baseless accusations of electoral fraud, persistent attacks on the Republican governor and the Secretary of State for State and explosive tweets regarding the coronavirus relief program.

In the last month alone, Mr Trump called on Gov. Brian Kemp to step down, accused Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger of having a sibling with the Chinese government (Mr Raffensperger has no sibling) , threatened with veto the pandemic relief package, sided with Democrats on the need for stronger stimulus checks, and claimed Georgia Republicans were “fools” who were virtually controlled by Stacey Abrams and the Democrats.

Mr. Trump is due to travel to northwest Georgia on Monday, just a day before election day. The appearance underscores the complicated relationship Republicans have with the incumbent president at the moment, according to party members and members of the state’s Republican caucus. They need Mr. Trump to motivate the grassroots, while there remains a source of tension that has put Mr. Perdue and Ms. Loeffler under significant pressure in the flows.

Trump “delivers a sort of mixed message,” said Alan Abramowitz, a political scientist at Emory University in Atlanta. “Because if you look at the rally he organized in Valdosta, the first time he came down he spent more time expressing his own grievances about the presidential election and claiming that he had been conned out of victory than he actually did to support Loeffler or Purdue. . He approved of them, but he didn’t seem as concerned with these races as he did with the idea of ​​trying to challenge the presidential race.

Charles. S. Bullock III, professor of political science at the University of Georgia, said the crucial question surrounding Mr. Trump’s rally is: “Will this convince some people who have so far said that they wouldn’t vote? “

Democrats, he said, appeared to have done a better job of getting people to the polls for early voting, which ended in places on Thursday. “So this would be the last moment – a last-ditch effort to sideline the people who have been sitting on the sidelines,” Mr Bullock said.

Democratic candidates spent New Year’s Eve targeting voters representing their base: younger voters, minority Atlanta-area voters, and loyal Liberals. Mr. Ossoff was scheduled to speak at two virtual “Watch Night” services, the New Year’s Eve tradition that dates back to 1862, when freed black Americans living in Union States gathered in anticipation of the proclamation. emancipation.

Mr Ossoff and Mr Warnock have several drive-through rallies scheduled from Friday to Election Day, including separate events with Mr Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris.

More than three million inhabitants have already voted in the races. The breakdown of the votes so far has fueled Democratic hopes: Population centers such as Fulton and DeKalb counties in metropolitan Atlanta have extremely high turnout, and the percentage of black voters continues to exceed the levels of presidential elections.

Almost four-hour long videos of voting lines in Cobb County angered some liberal groups and voting rights advocates who said it was a failure by state and local leaders. The NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund sent two letters to Mr. Raffensperger, the state’s top election official, who warned that an increase in polling stations in the county was needed to cope to increased participation.

Republicans believe many of their supporters wait until Jan. 5 to vote in person. Across the country in November, Republicans saw heavy in-person voter turnout wipe out Democratic leaders in states like Florida and Texas. Republicans might also be particularly keen to vote in person this time around, given widespread fears of voter fraud that Mr. Trump has instilled in his base since his loss.

The announcement that Mr. Perdue would be temporarily out of the election campaign in the final days of the race surprised some Republicans, who were preparing for Mr. Trump’s visit on Monday. Mr Perdue is still hopeful he will attend the rally with the president, according to a person familiar with the campaign, considering that he has not tested positive for the virus and has several days to test negative before the event.

Even before Thursday, when his campaign revealed exposure to the virus, Mr Perdue had organized fewer public events than Ms Loeffler or their Democratic opponents. The campaign did not provide a specific timeline for Mr. Perdue’s return to public events.

“The senator and his wife have been tested regularly throughout the campaign, and the team will continue to follow CDC guidelines,” the statement read.

At the New Year’s Eve concert in Gainesville on Thursday, organized by the campaigns of the two Republican senators, the absence of Mr. Perdue was not recognized. Instead, speakers used Mr Trump’s scheduled appearance on Monday as a hook: go vote Tuesday after watching the president the day before.

Ms Loeffler was joined by Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, who stressed participation in the north was crucial to overcoming Democratic enthusiasm in urban centers.

“This is the part of the state that is raising the score to take down Atlanta, do you understand that?” he said. “If Republicans win, I’m the budget chairman. If we lose Georgia, Bernie Sanders is the budget chair. “

He left no room for the subtext. A vote for Republicans in Georgia, Graham said, was a vote to ensure Democrats could get little of their agenda passed in Washington.

“Anything that comes out of Pelosi’s house, it will come to the Senate and we will kill it,” he said, as the crowd roared in approval.

“If you’re a Tory and that doesn’t motivate you to vote, then you’re legally dead.”

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Georgia Republicans deliver lingering message: fear Democrats

NORCROSS, Georgia – The biggest applause in Sen. Kelly Loeffler’s brutal speech doesn’t concern Ms Loeffler at all.

When the crowd is most engaged, including Thursday morning at a community pavilion in suburban Atlanta, Loeffler invokes President Trump or attacks his Democratic opponents as socialists and Marxists. Its own political platforms are rarely mentioned.

“Are you ready to keep fighting for President Trump and show America that Georgia is a Red State?” Mrs. Loeffler said when she took the microphone. “We are the firewall to stop socialism and we must hold the line.”

These are the themes of the closing arguments in the second round of the Georgia Senate, which reflected the partisanship and polarization of the national political environment. Ms Loeffler and her Senate colleague David Perdue seek to motivate a Tory base that is still loyal to Mr Trump while picking up some of the defectors who helped hand Georgia over to a Democratic presidential candidate for the first time since 1992.

Democrats are eager to prove that Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s victory over President Trump in Georgia was more than a fluke, and that the state is ready to embrace their party’s more progressive political agenda, rather than to oppose Trumpness alone.

But the race is also emblematic of the current political messages of each party. Jon Ossoff and Reverend Raphael Warnock, the Democratic Senate candidates, presented an array of policy proposals that mix the common priorities of the moderate center and the progressive left: passing a new voting rights law, expanding Medicaid without supporting a single payer system, investment in clean energy while stopping before the Green New Deal, and criminal justice reform that does not include cutting funding to police.

Republicans are not looking for such a calibration. Mr Perdue, who announced Thursday he would be quarantined after coming into contact with someone who had tested positive for the coronavirus, and Ms Loeffler believe their loyalists are more motivated by what their candidates oppose than by what they defend.

There are signs that this approach has resonated with many Republican voters. At Ms Loeffler’s event in Norcross, and later at a New Years Eve concert in Gainesville, voters said their top priorities were to support Mr Trump and his allegations of voter fraud and push back the perceived excesses of the Liberals and their candidates.

“The most important factor for me is to stop socialism,” said Melinda Weeks, a 62-year-old voter who lives in Gwinnett County. “I don’t want to see our country become the Chinese Communist Party.”

John Wright, 64, said he voted for Ms Loeffler and Mr Perdue, but believes Republicans need to do a better job reaching out to minority voters. He cited the change in racial makeup that continued rapidly in Georgia and fueled Democrats’ chances of winning statewide seats.

“Republicans have to figure out how to help these people, how to reach these people,” Wright said. “These demographics are changing and you can’t just present the American Dream to people who haven’t been able to achieve the American Dream.”

The statewide jockey comes at a tumultuous time in Georgia politics, as Mr. Trump continues to shake up Senate races with his baseless accusations of electoral fraud, persistent attacks on the Republican governor and the Secretary of State for State and explosive tweets regarding the coronavirus relief program.

In the last month alone, Mr Trump called on Gov. Brian Kemp to step down, accused Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger of having a sibling with the Chinese government (Mr Raffensperger has no sibling) , threatened with veto the pandemic relief package, sided with Democrats on the need for stronger stimulus checks, and claimed Georgia Republicans were “fools” who were virtually controlled by Stacey Abrams and the Democrats.

Mr. Trump is due to travel to northwest Georgia on Monday, just a day before election day. The appearance underscores the complicated relationship Republicans have with the incumbent president at the moment, according to party members and members of the state’s Republican caucus. They need Mr. Trump to motivate the grassroots, while there remains a source of tension that has put Mr. Perdue and Ms. Loeffler under significant pressure in the flows.

Trump “delivers a sort of mixed message,” said Alan Abramowitz, a political scientist at Emory University in Atlanta. “Because if you look at the rally he organized in Valdosta, the first time he came down he spent more time expressing his own grievances about the presidential election and claiming that he had been conned out of victory than he actually did to support Loeffler or Purdue. . He approved of them, but he didn’t seem as concerned with these races as he did with the idea of ​​trying to challenge the presidential race.

Charles. S. Bullock III, professor of political science at the University of Georgia, said the crucial question surrounding Mr. Trump’s rally is: “Will this convince some people who have so far said that they wouldn’t vote? “

Democrats, he said, appeared to have done a better job of getting people to the polls for early voting, which ended in places on Thursday. “So this would be the last moment – a last-ditch effort to sideline the people who have been sitting on the sidelines,” Mr Bullock said.

Democratic candidates spent New Year’s Eve targeting voters representing their base: younger voters, minority Atlanta-area voters, and loyal Liberals. Mr. Ossoff was scheduled to speak at two virtual “Watch Night” services, the New Year’s Eve tradition that dates back to 1862, when freed black Americans living in Union States gathered in anticipation of the proclamation. emancipation.

Mr Ossoff and Mr Warnock have several drive-through rallies scheduled from Friday to Election Day, including separate events with Mr Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris.

More than three million inhabitants have already voted in the races. The breakdown of the votes so far has fueled Democratic hopes: Population centers such as Fulton and DeKalb counties in metropolitan Atlanta have extremely high turnout, and the percentage of black voters continues to exceed the levels of presidential elections.

Almost four-hour long videos of voting lines in Cobb County angered some liberal groups and voting rights advocates who said it was a failure by state and local leaders. The NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund sent two letters to Mr. Raffensperger, the state’s top election official, who warned that an increase in polling stations in the county was needed to cope to increased participation.

Republicans believe many of their supporters wait until Jan. 5 to vote in person. Across the country in November, Republicans saw heavy in-person voter turnout wipe out Democratic leaders in states like Florida and Texas. Republicans might also be particularly keen to vote in person this time around, given widespread fears of voter fraud that Mr. Trump has instilled in his base since his loss.

The announcement that Mr. Perdue would be temporarily out of the election campaign in the final days of the race surprised some Republicans, who were preparing for Mr. Trump’s visit on Monday. Mr Perdue is still hopeful he will attend the rally with the president, according to a person familiar with the campaign, considering that he has not tested positive for the virus and has several days to test negative before the event.

Even before Thursday, when his campaign revealed exposure to the virus, Mr Perdue had organized fewer public events than Ms Loeffler or their Democratic opponents. The campaign did not provide a specific timeline for Mr. Perdue’s return to public events.

“The senator and his wife have been tested regularly throughout the campaign, and the team will continue to follow CDC guidelines,” the statement read.

At the New Year’s Eve concert in Gainesville on Thursday, organized by the campaigns of the two Republican senators, the absence of Mr. Perdue was not recognized. Instead, speakers used Mr Trump’s scheduled appearance on Monday as a hook: go vote Tuesday after watching the president the day before.

Ms Loeffler was joined by Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, who stressed participation in the north was crucial to overcoming Democratic enthusiasm in urban centers.

“This is the part of the state that is raising the score to take down Atlanta, do you understand that?” he said. “If Republicans win, I’m the budget chairman. If we lose Georgia, Bernie Sanders is the budget chair. “

He left no room for the subtext. A vote for Republicans in Georgia, Graham said, was a vote to ensure Democrats could get little of their agenda passed in Washington.

“Anything that comes out of Pelosi’s house, it will come to the Senate and we will kill it,” he said, as the crowd roared in approval.

“If you’re a Tory and that doesn’t motivate you to vote, then you’re legally dead.”

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Louisville calls for police reform. Can an interim chef deliver?

Seeing their need, Chef Gentry raised enough money to purchase dozens of air conditioning units. Along with other officers, she installed them. It would not be an exaggeration to say that his project may have saved lives; more than 250 people in the Midwest have died from the heat this summer.

“Policing is a great opportunity to learn more about how you help people,” said Chief Gentry. “Very few people have the privilege of peeking behind the curtains, so that’s what you do with that information, you know, what are you going to do with it now that you see it?”

Over the next two decades, Chief Gentry rose through the ranks, becoming Deputy Chief in 2011 and retiring from the force in January 2015.

Then this summer he was asked to come back. Some friends told him not to. Her husband was also skeptical, worried about his health – Chief Gentry was declared free from breast cancer in 2016.

During his swearing-in ceremony, Mayor Greg Fischer described the unrest in Louisville as “a difficult time, unlike anything we have ever seen.”

One October night, at the suburban home of state attorney general Daniel Cameron, about four dozen demonstrators gathered to protest his office’s investigation into Ms Taylor’s death. Police officers were there too: they formed a line and started to march, urging the crowd to get out of the street. Reluctantly, the protesters retreated, in a scene that has become typical in 2020.

When asked about Chief Gentry’s ability to improve conditions in Louisville, protesters disagreed. Travis Nagdy, 21, said he would wait and see, although he was skeptical that she could fix the issues that led to the protests in the first place. About a month later, on November 23, Mr. Nagdy was shot and killed in Louisville. The police made no arrests in this case.

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Black voters helped deliver Biden a presidential victory. Now what?

[Race affects our lives in countless ways. To read more stories on race from The New York Times, sign up here for our Race/Related newsletter.]

When President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. thanked black voters his victory speech Saturday night for saving her campaign when it was at its lowest point and saying “you’ve always had my back, and I’ll have yours,” Kourtney Neloms didn’t cheer like the hundreds in attendance.

Instead, listening to Mr. Biden speak in Wilmington, Del., Of her hometown of Detroit, she felt somewhat skeptical.

“OK, let’s see if he’s really being honest about it,” recalls Ms. Neloms, 42, who is black. “My prayer is that it is not just lip service.”

As black voters across the country celebrated the election of Mr. Biden and his vice-president, Senator Kamala Harris of California, many have said in recent days that the administration will have to prove its sincerity to tackle the the country’s vast inequalities and systemic barriers.

“I’m hopeful and ready to give Biden a chance, but I’m not completely sold,” said Geary Woolfolk, 53, who is black and lives in suburban Atlanta.

In this year’s election, Mr. Biden attracted around 87% of black votes. At the same time, Mr. Trump, despite being widely seen as inflaming racial hatred, won more black voters than in 2016, especially among black men, according to the polls leaving the polls.

In two dozen interviews, some African-American voters echoed a long-standing political concern they were underestimated, especially within the Democratic Party which they have firmly supported for decades. While Democrats still face high expectations of black communities, the pressure on Mr Biden, an initially moderate compromise, may be even greater due to the recent summer of protests against police brutality and systemic racism, the racial makeup of its electoral coalition. and its own past.

In this year’s presidential bid, Mr. Biden’s political identity was largely shaped by his serving as vice president to Barack Obama, the country’s first African-American president. He used that experience to gain black support, and it was black voters in South Carolina who saved his campaign during the Democratic primary.

He also addressed an issue that could have affected black support, acknowledging that parts of his signing legislation as a longtime Delaware senator, the 1994 Crime Bill, were wrong. Much of his campaign speech also focused on tackling racial disparities, with the coronavirus pandemic disproportionately affecting black and Latin communities, and incidents of police violence leading to one of the biggest protest movements in the history of the country.

Mr Biden and Mrs Harris – the first black woman to win a presidential ticket – racked up huge margins on Mr Trump in Detroit, Milwaukee, Philadelphia and Atlanta, cities with large populations or majority blacks that gave a significant boost to the president-elect. in hotly contested swing states.

Mr. Biden’s dramatic vow in his victory speech to return the favor to the black voters who so ardently supported him was an unusually explicit commitment to African Americans from a new president.

“This creates a situation where there is more pressure to provide for the black community,” said Isaiah Thomas, a Philadelphia city councilor who is black. “I don’t think we can recreate that moment here. So we need to get everything we can for the poor and people of color.

During the campaign, Mr. Biden released a broad political platform outlining his plan for black America. It included proposals to invest in black businesses and entrepreneurs, create homeownership opportunities, reduce racial disparities in education, and tackle a criminal justice system that stops, condemns and disproportionately imprison members of black communities.

As he began his transition this week, Mr Biden released a plan that included a section on racial equity. Activists from the Black Lives Movement coalition said on Tuesday they sent a letter to Biden asking him to play a role in the transition, but had not received a response.

Shortly after Mr Biden’s speech on Saturday, Mr Woolfolk, a centrist who described his vote not necessarily in favor of the new president but rather in opposition to Mr Trump, wrote an open letter to Mr Biden. He said the Democratic Party did not deserve its vote – nor its loyalty. “Politicians,” he wrote on Facebook, “my vote is up for auction – what will you do for me and my species now that the elections are over?

The father of three grown sons, Mr Woolfolk has said he wants police accountability without unblocking departments and better preparation for black students heading to college or trades school.

Jean Brooks Murphy was among the more than 60% of black voters in South Carolina who saved Mr. Biden’s primary campaign.

“Biden definitely owes us an administration that works on equality,” said Ms. Brooks Murphy, 74, a retired retail buyer living in Charleston. She says that access to health care is an important priority for her because she has many friends “who are afraid to go to the doctor or who don’t go because they don’t have the necessary. means of paying for treatment or drugs ”.

Part of the challenge for Mr. Biden will be to merge the broad and divergent views black Americans have on political goals, ideas, and strategies. Some see a radical overhaul of systems – from policing to housing – as the path to equality, while others prefer more moderate measures that can garner support from all political backgrounds.

While young black progressive activists defend slogans like “Defend the Police”, Representative James E. Clyburn of South Carolina, one of the most powerful black members of Congress, criticized the use of such expressions. He argued that they threatened to undermine support for racial justice movements and hurt Democrats in the election.

Banika Jones, 41, who works in catering for Detroit public schools, said she wanted to see reparations for blacks, a public option for health insurance, a living wage for workers and elimination of student debt.

I want to see real and real socialist reform, ”she said, highlighting the political ideology Republicans have used to demonize Democrats. “I said a bad word and I meant it. I want us to head to Denmark. “

Although she voted for Mr Biden, Ms Jones said she was not thrilled with him. Instead, she saw it as a continuation of the old Democrats, who seem more inclined to try to appease voters in the middle, rather than pushing for real change for African Americans and other marginalized groups.

Democrats always say they’re going to do something, ”she said. “They will improve health care. They will help us with education. They are going to do something about poverty. But they have thorns made from ramen or something. They absolutely do not want to stand up and fight. “

Jaymes Savage is far from disappointed. A 19-year-old sophomore at Rutgers-Camden University, he voted for the first time this year and is excited about what a Biden-Harris administration could mean for a black Philadelphia man like himself. He especially hopes that Ms Harris – whose father immigrated from Jamaica and mother immigrated from India – will be able to understand the continuing struggles in her community.

I’m a little cautious, “he said,” but then again I’m still hopeful because he specifically addressed us and he said we were a key part of his victory at the elections. I have a feeling that he will really try to help us more now.

It was not enough for black voters to wait for Mr. Biden to help their communities, some said. They needed to force the problem.

Jasmine M. Johnson, who spent a year helping to mobilize voters in Milwaukee, where the turnout was similar to 2016, said she was thrilled with Mr Biden’s victory – and hopes her Cabinet selections include black women, “who have delivered yet again.” After that, she said, the president’s black agenda should prioritize closing the wealth gap.

“This election cycle has been a refresher for some and a crash course for others in civics,” said Ms Johnson, 39. “We must collectively understand the impact of elections on our lives and collectively respond to our demand on this new administration – and then hold them accountable.”

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TimesVideoWatch Live: Allegheny County officials deliver update Election officials for Allegheny County, Pa., Which includes Pittsburgh, provide an update on the vote count for this region as the presidential race is approaching a result.

TimesVideoWatch Live: Allegheny County officials deliver update Election officials for Allegheny County, Pa., Which includes Pittsburgh, provide an update on the vote count for this region as the presidential race is approaching a result.

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Video: Watch Live: Nevada Officials Deliver Election Update

TimesVideoWatch Live: Nevada officials deliver election update Nevada election officials take stock as the presidential race tightens.

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Undeterred by pandemic, Americans prepare to deliver verdict on Trump

The voters were full of nervous energy. New Jersey high school history teacher Katie Whelan crossed the Pennsylvania border to knock on doors this weekend for Mr Biden at the key battlefield. The night before, she said, she had woken up from a dream of panic involving Hillary Clinton and the fear of just running out of the ballot boxes. “She was like, ‘Honey, I’ve been there,’” Ms. Whelan recalled to Ms. Clinton telling her in the dream.

Adding to her anxiety, Ms Whelan couldn’t tell if the nightmare was in 2016 or 2020. “I stood over the sink and drank three gallons of water,” Ms. Whelan said. “And I was like, ‘I better do some canvassing.'”

For Mr. Trump and Mr. Biden, their final events of the last full day of the 2020 campaign offered as vivid a demonstration of their differences as anything they have said.

Seeking to project a sense of normalcy even as the number of cases of infection soars, Mr. Trump flouted public health guidelines with a series of large rallies in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin, and even winked at the dismissal of the country’s top infectious disease expert. , Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, should he win another term, in a Florida rally that lasted after midnight Sunday.

In Ohio and Pennsylvania, Mr Biden argued that there can be no return to routine until the virus is under control and his route of socially distanced remote rallies – “Honk if you agree with me! ” he yelled at Cleveland – served as a visual expression of his sober approach. Mr Biden, the former vice president, presented the race as a referendum on Mr Trump’s handling of a pandemic that has infected more than nine million people in the United States and claimed more than 230,000 lives.

“The first step to beating the virus is to beat Donald Trump,” Biden said, adding, “The power to change the country is in your hands.”