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Global action is ‘very far’ from what is needed to avoid climate chaos

The global scientific consensus is clear: emissions of gases that warm the planet must be halved by almost half by 2030 if the world is to have a good chance of avoiding the worst climate disasters.

The global political response so far has been disappointing.

New climate targets submitted by countries to the United Nations would reduce emissions by less than 1%, according to the latest tally released Friday by the world body.

The head of the United Nations climate agency, Patricia Espinosa, said figures compiled by her office showed that “current levels of climate ambition are a long way from putting us on the path to achieving our goals. objectives of the Paris Agreement ”.

The numbers prove the reality of the many promises coming from global capitals and corporate boards that executives are taking climate change seriously.

United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres called the report a “red alert”.

The tally is all the more damning as less than half of all countries submit new targets to the United Nations. The Paris climate agreement, intended to limit the increase in global temperatures, had urged them to do so by the end of 2020.

The United States, which has produced more greenhouse gas emissions than any other country in history, is still missing from the ledger. He joined the Paris Agreement last week, following the withdrawal of former President Donald J. Trump. It has yet to submit its 2030 targets and is under pressure from climate advocates to cut emissions by at least 50% from 2005 levels.

Likewise, China, which currently produces the largest share of emissions, has yet to submit new 2030 targets to the United Nations. Its president, Xi Jinping, said in December that China would generate more of its electricity from renewable sources (25%), cultivate more forests (six billion cubic meters) and reduce its carbon intensity by more than 65%. , which means that as the Chinese economy grows, its carbon emissions would increase at a slower rate than before.

Xi said China will be carbon neutral by 2060, which means it will remove global warming carbon emissions from the atmosphere, equal to how much it is still producing at this time – the.

The Biden administration has said it aspires to net zero emissions by 2050, but has yet to detail how it will achieve it.

All eyes are on an international climate summit that the White House is expected to host on April 22. The United States is expected to announce its climate goals for 2030 by then, and China may well make its own announcement.

Diplomacy culminates with the next round of UN climate talks, due to be held in Glasgow in November.

Some of the biggest emitting countries – including Australia, Brazil and Russia – have submitted new plans for 2030 without raising their ambitions. Mexico lowered its climate targets, which the Natural Resources Defense Council described as a signal that “Mexico is effectively withdrawing from its previous leadership on climate and clean energy.

In contrast, 36 countries – including Britain, Chile, Kenya, Nepal and the 27 countries of the European Union – have raised their climate targets.

The Paris Agreement is designed in such a way that the United Nations cannot dictate or enforce a country’s climate goals or so-called nationally determined contributions. Each country is expected to set its own goals, report regularly to the world on its progress, and set new goals every five years. Diplomatic peer pressure aims to persuade each country to be more ambitious.

The ultimate goal is to limit the increase in global temperature to less than 1.5 degrees Celsius from 1990 levels. Any warming beyond that, scientists have said in exhaustive studies, could make it worse. forest fires and droughts, growing food and water insecurity and the inundation of coastal towns and small islands.

The Alliance of Small Island States, a group of countries that are among the most threatened by climate change, released a scathing response to the report on Friday.

“This report confirms the shocking lack of urgency and real action,” Aubrey Webson, Antigua and Barbuda diplomat and president of the alliance, said in a statement. “We are dangerously flirting with the 1.5 degree Celsius warming limit that the world has agreed we must meet.”

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Men pose as marshals to avoid masks at Florida Resort, authorities say

Two men were arrested and charged with posing as a federal officer after pretending to be US marshals to avoid wearing masks at a South Florida resort, according to a criminal complaint.

Walter Wayne Brown Jr., 53, and Gary Brummett, 81, flashed mask exemption cards and fake US Marshal badges to circumvent hotel mask rules, according to the criminal complaint filed with of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida. They were arrested last week after a real US Marshal was sent to the hotel to validate their claims.

The men were invited to the Wyndham Deerfield Beach Resort, a beachfront hotel in Broward County, Florida. The resort did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the arrests, which were reported by The South Florida Sun-Sentinel.

During their confrontations with station staff, both men wore “authentic-looking” circular badges with a seven-pointed star that read “Cherokee Nation Marshal” and “Aniyvwiya Criminal Justice Deputy,” according to the report. complaint.

Around their neck, plastic cards bearing the words “NOTICE / FACE MASK EXEMPT CARD”. The cards said they were “exempt from any ordinance requiring the use of a face mask in public” and that “wearing a face mask presented me with a mental and / or physical risk”.

“Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), I am not obligated to disclose my terms to you,” the cards read. The cards also listed true violations of the ADA reporting the phone number.

While there, Mr Brummett approached the front desk to ask for coffee, according to the criminal complaint. When an employee working at the front desk asked him to wear a mask, Mr Brummett presented the face mask exemption card and said the hotel would be fined $ 75,000 if forced to wear a mask. Then he showed a badge on his belt and threatened to arrest the employee.

“Do you know what this means? I am an American Marshal and I can get you arrested if you force me to wear a mask,” Mr. Brummett said, according to the complaint.

On two occasions, Mr Brown showed a similar card and US Marshal identification to hotel managers when asked to wear a mask in the common areas of the resort, according to the complaint.

Hotel staff “thought it odd that a federal agent would dispute the wearing of a mask,” according to the complaint, so they informed the Broward County Sheriff’s Office, who called a real US Marshal to investigate the authenticity of the allegations. .

The men have never been employed by the US Marshals Service or the Cherokee Nation Marshal Service, based in North Carolina and Oklahoma, according to the complaint.

The men were arrested on February 11, according to records from the Broward County Sheriff’s Office. If found guilty, the men face a fine or up to three years in prison.

Tony Moss, a lawyer representing Mr. Brummett, declined to comment. A lawyer for Mr Brown did not immediately respond to inquiries.

Fraudulent cards that claim to offer exemptions to hide the rules have been circulating since the early months of the coronavirus pandemic. At one point, a group called the Freedom to Breathe Agency sold the cards online in boxes of at least 500 for $ 49.99. Federal officials said the cards were neither issued nor approved by the Department of Justice.

Although health officials, including those from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, recommend wearing a face covering in public to reduce the spread of the coronavirus, there remains resistance among some who view the mask rules as a violation of personal freedom.

Kitty bennett contributed to the research.

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Here’s how to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning when you’re trying to stay warm.

As the bone-freezing arctic climate sweeps across the southern and central United States, power grids are strained and millions of people unaccustomed to the sight of snow are trying to figure out how to stay warm.

Some have turned to risky heat sources, including gasoline generators, stoves and even automobiles. At least two people have died and around 100 have been sickened by carbon monoxide poisoning for more than 16 hours from Monday to Tuesday in the Houston area, authorities said.

The early symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include headache, weakness, dizziness, and nausea, according to Firelands Regional Medical Center in Sandusky, Ohio. People who “sleep or are drunk” may die from the disease before experiencing symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Carbon monoxide, a byproduct of burning fossil fuels, is colorless and odorless, making it more difficult to detect than other hazardous substances. But carbon monoxide poisoning is “completely preventable,” according to the CDC.

The agency urged people to have working carbon monoxide detectors and warned against heating homes with a gas oven or burning anything in a stove or fireplace that is not ventilated. .

Using charcoal, gasoline engines, or even portable gas stoves indoors is also dangerous, health and safety officials say. They also warn against running generators or cars indoors to heat homes.

In Houston, police said this week that a woman and a girl had been killed by carbon monoxide poisoning after a car was left running in an attached garage “to create heat in the event of a power failure”. A man and a boy were also hospitalized.

In Oregon, four people were killed by carbon monoxide poisoning over the weekend, according to the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office said Tuesday.

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In Milwaukee, Biden reassures and tries to avoid mentioning ‘the old guy’

WASHINGTON – On his first official trip away from Washington since taking office, President Biden on Tuesday offered Americans assurance of the availability of coronavirus vaccines and his optimism that his relief bill of $ 1, $ 9 trillion was the type of ambitious plan that could restore the US economy.

“Now is the time we should be spending,” he said at a CNN town hall in Milwaukee, promoting a plan that so far has no Republican support in Congress. “Now is the time to get big.

On the coronavirus, he said every American who wanted a vaccine would be able to get one “ by the end of July of this year, ” sounding a more optimistic note than last week when he warned that logistical hurdles would most likely mean a lot Americans still would not have been vaccinated by the end of the summer.

“We will have over 600 million doses – enough to immunize every American,” he said at an event that included not only his own supporters, but Trump voters and independents as well.

Mr. Biden predicted that “by next Christmas I think we will be in a very different, benevolent situation than we are today.”

The town hall’s question-and-answer format gave the president the opportunity to put into practice what has been his hallmark of personal politics for decades. When an independent voter asked him how his son with a pre-existing illness could get vaccinated, for example, Mr Biden told him, ‘If you want, I’ll stay after this is over and maybe we can. be talking a few minutes and see if I can help you. “

At another point, he comforted an 8-year-old girl whose mother said she was afraid of dying from Covid-19. “You are the safest group of people in the world,” he says. “I wouldn’t care, baby, I promise.”

Expressing sympathy for the girl’s missed school time, Mr Biden said his administration’s goal was still to open most schools full-time to K-8 students within the first 100 days. .

The pledge appeared to contradict White House press secretary Jen Psaki, who said last week that the administration’s once-ambitious goal of reopening had been scaled back so that more than 50% of schools dispensed. “One instruction” in person “at least one day a week” in the first 100 days. She later added, “We certainly hope to build from this even at 100 days.”

But Mr Biden bristled at the idea that he was lowering the bar to one day a week of school in person. “This is what has been reported,” the president said. “It’s not true. It was a mistake in the communication.

He also said he expected school to continue through the summer to give students the opportunity to catch up.

The trip to Milwaukee seemed like some sort of makeup tour for the city, which was scheduled to host the 2020 Democratic National Convention last summer, before the coronavirus pandemic upended plans for in-person meetings.

And the cadre, in a state he won by less than a percentage point in November, made sense for a president pushing a plan to help Americans recover from the ravages of the pandemic.

An increase in coronavirus cases has made Wisconsin one of the worst-hit states throughout fall and early winter, although the numbers have dropped significantly. The state’s 5.5% unemployment rate is also down from double-digit highs it hit at the start of the pandemic, but it’s still higher than it was. last winter.

On Tuesday night, Air Force One landed in a snowstorm Wisconsin, and as the nation’s attention was finally more fully focused on Mr. Biden, after the end of the second impeachment trial of his predecessor, Donald J. Trump, over the weekend.

Continuing his practice throughout the arraignment, Mr Biden seemed eager to avoid mentioning his most recent predecessor. At one point he called Mr. Trump “the old guy”.

Asked by moderator, CNN presenter Anderson Cooper, on his thoughts on the verdict in Mr. Trump’s impeachment trial, Biden said he wanted to move on. “For the past four years, all that’s been in the news has been Trump,” he said. “The next four years, I want to make sure all the news is about the American people. I’m tired of talking about Trump.

At one point, however, he couldn’t resist a veiled search, telling Mr. Cooper all but one of the living former presidents had contacted him by phone, making it clear that only Mr. Trump was not there. had not done.

Asked by Mr. Cooper about his suitability for the presidency, Mr. Biden, who on inauguration day said going to the White House felt like “coming home”, appeared humbled by experience.

On the one hand, he said, he was not used to living with a butler who helped him with his coat, as well as with other members of the White House residence staff who were there to serve it. “I was brought up in such a way that you weren’t looking for anyone to wait for you,” he said. “I find myself extremely embarrassed.”

Despite his close relationship with President Barack Obama, Mr Biden said he had never visited the private part of the White House residence before moving in last month. And he said living there was a big contrast to the vice president’s residence, where there was more space and privacy.

“It’s kind of like a golden cage in terms of being able to walk outside and do things,” he said of life in the White House. “I feel a sense, I have to tell you, a sense of history about it.

Mr Biden has repeatedly apologized when he felt his answers were too complicated or took too long, and he said he hoped he was up to the task of leading the country to face the challenges that he is confronted.

“I am literally praying for the ability to do for the country what you all deserve to be done,” Biden said.

Ms Psaki said on Tuesday that Mr Biden hoped to have “a good conversation with people about the way forward, and, also, even with people who disagree with him” during the trip. In fact, one of the president’s most vocal critics is Senator Ron Johnson, the Republican state senator, who vehemently opposes Biden’s rescue plan. But Ms Psaki said putting pressure on Mr Johnson was not the purpose of the trip.

Responding to a question about divisions in American society, Biden said the country agreed more on the need for relief than people realize, noting that 69% of Americans support his plan. “The nation is not divided,” he said. “You go over there and look and talk to people, you have bangs at both ends. But it’s not as divided as we pretend.

Outside the Pabst Theater, where town hall was held, a group representing fast food restaurants and other low-wage workers were planning to hold a protest to urge Mr Biden not to give up on his pledge to raise the salary minimum at $ 15 per hour.

But when asked by several small business owners about his support for a minimum wage of $ 15 an hour, the president sought to reassure them that the increase would be gradual, as if to show that the differences could be overcome. While “no one should be working 40 hours a week and living in poverty,” Biden said, “it’s only legitimate for small business owners to be concerned about how this is changing.”

But he singled out white supremacists as a singular domestic terrorist threat that needed to be addressed. “I would make my Department of Justice and the Civil Rights Division focus heavily on these same people,” he said. “I would make sure we focused, in fact, on how to deal with the rise of white supremacy.”

Dan Simmons contributed reporting from Milwaukee.

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Can the United States Avoid More Political Violence?

Last week’s violence on Capitol Hill may not live up to extremists’ plans: FBI warns of possible armed protests in all 50 states. It’s Tuesday and here is your political advice sheet. register here to get On Politics delivered to your inbox every day of the week.

Biden received his second vaccine yesterday in Newark, Del.


The violent end of Trump’s presidency only puts an exclamation mark on the repetitive phrase of ethically questionable behavior displayed throughout his four-year tenure.

And as he leaves office, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle are already working on ethics changes that seek to prevent some of his most egregious behaviors from normalizing.

Our reporter Elizabeth williamson wrote an article detailing the status of such an overhaul and the likelihood of it being enacted early in Biden’s tenure. Elizabeth has agreed to answer a few questions on the subject for us.

How much of it is about putting in writing things – like presidents who release their tax returns – that had been considered standard political practice, but never made it into official policy before Trump start to rape them?

The Trump administration scandals have revealed two things. First, how many norms of presidential behavior do not enshrined in law, but rather a matter of tradition, imposed by political shame. For example, the idea that presidents disclose their tax returns or that they do not transfer taxpayer money to their family businesses.

Second, the outgoing president laid out the need to update the last major ethics reform bill to pass by Congress: the now squeaky 1978 Ethics in Government Act, passed after the Watergate. These reforms came in response to President Richard Nixon’s use of the Justice Department to prosecute his political enemies. Trump’s yen for doing the same suggests a tune-up is in order.

One of Trump’s most obvious ways to dismiss ethical concerns was his drive to fire inspectors general. How would the current proposals strengthen the protections of inspectors general of executive agencies?

In fact, the IG protection component of the reform package has received early action in the House, according to Aaron Scherb of Common Cause, one of the watch groups pushing for these changes.

On January 5, on the eve of the Capitol Riot, the bipartisan Inspector General Protection Act – introduced by Representatives Ted Lieu, Democrat of California, and Jody Hice, Republican of Georgia – passed the House by voice vote.

The law would help protect inspectors general from retaliation, for example by requiring the executive branch to notify Congress before placing an IG on administrative leave. And that would help ensure vacant IG positions are filled quickly by requiring the executive to provide Congress with an explanation for not appointing an IG after an extended vacancy.

Biden is on the cusp of being a Democratic president with a Democratic Congress. Is there any real concern that party officials may not be keen to pass tough regulations, as Democrats are now calling the shots?

Historically, presidents have been reluctant to renounce any expansion of power enjoyed by their predecessor administrations. But given the titanic ethical blast holes some of these proposals aim to fill, like banning presidential self-pardons or preventing a sitting secretary from using official travel to make a campaign speech. politically, Democrats expect the next to be relatively minor.

Republican support for the changes is less clear. While some may jump at the chance to put the brakes on a Democratic president, the worry is that they will be afraid to support reforms that could be interpreted by Trump or his supporters as criticism of him.

On Politics is also available as a newsletter. register here to have it delivered to your inbox.

Do you think we are missing something? Do you want to see more? We would love to hear from you. Write to us at onpolitics@nytimes.com.

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The Wall Street Journal editorial board urges Trump to step down to avoid a second indictment.

The editorial board of the Wall Street Journal, the flagship of Rupert Murdoch’s newspaper empire, on Thursday denounced President Trump for inciting a crowd of his supporters to storm the United States Capitol, declaring his behavior “ungodly. And urging Mr. Trump to step down from office to prevent a second impeachment by the Democratic-controlled House.

In an unsigned article titled “Donald The Last Days of Trump, ”the Journal’s editorial page – an indicator of the conservative establishment – excoriated the president for“ an assault on the constitutional process of transfer of power after an election ”and said that“ this week he probably ended up as a serious political figure. “

“If Mr. Trump is to avoid a second indictment, his best course would be to take personal responsibility and resign,” the Journal wrote, concluding: “It’s better for everyone, including himself, if he leaves quietly.

The Journal’s editorial page, run by editor Paul Gigot, has criticized Mr. Trump in the past, sometimes harshly. But his latest salvo was a stark repudiation of the president by a media outlet controlled by Mr. Murdoch, whose cable network Fox News is home to several of Mr. Trump’s most loyal and long-standing media advocates.

Mr Murdoch’s publicists had previously indicated he did not expect Mr Trump to resume the presidency, and another Murdoch publication, The New York Post, proclaimed President-elect Joseph R. Biden’s victory. Jr. even though Mr. Trump refused to do so. accept the results.

The Post, in its own unsigned editorial on Thursday, paused before arguing that Mr. Trump should leave the White House prematurely, urging his aides to “stay and stop the madmen” instead. But given Mr. Murdoch’s influence over the political opinions of his publications, the Journal’s candid words for Mr. Trump – which once demanded Mr. Murdoch’s approval – indicate that the mogul is now looking to the beginning of Biden’s presidency.

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Wall Street Journal editorial urges Trump to step down to avoid impeachment

The editorial board of the Wall Street Journal, the flagship of Rupert Murdoch’s newspaper empire, on Thursday denounced President Trump for inciting a crowd of his supporters to storm the United States Capitol and encouraged Mr. Trump to step down from office to prevent a second impeachment by the Democratic-controlled House.

In an unsigned article with the headline “Donald The Last Days of Trump “, the Journal’s editorial page – a tipster of the conservative establishment – excoriated the president for” an attack on the constitutional process of transfer of power after an election “and said that” this week he probably ended up as a serious political figure. He described his behavior as ‘ungodly’.

“If Mr. Trump is to avoid a second indictment, his best course would be to take personal responsibility and resign,” the Journal wrote, concluding: “It’s better for everyone, including himself, if he leaves quietly.

The Journal’s editorial page, run by editor Paul A. Gigot, has criticized Mr. Trump in the past, sometimes harshly. But his latest salvo was a stark repudiation from the president of a media outlet controlled by Mr. Murdoch, whose cable network Fox News is home to several of Mr. Trump’s most loyal and long-standing media advocates.

Mr Murdoch’s publicists had previously indicated that he did not expect Mr Trump to win re-election, and another Murdoch publication, The New York Post, claimed the victory of President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. even as Mr. Trump refused. to accept the results.

The Post, in its own unsigned editorial on Thursday, paused before arguing that Mr. Trump should leave the White House prematurely, urging his aides to “stay and stop the madmen” instead. But given Mr. Murdoch’s influence over the political opinions of his newspapers, the Journal’s candid words on Thursday were sure to pique Mr. Trump, who had once sought the mogul’s approval.

The president received nicer treatment on Fox News on Wednesday night, when prime-time hosts like Sean Hannity and Laura Ingraham criticized the day’s violence on Capitol Hill, but refrained from blaming Mr. Trump.

A representative for Mr Murdoch did not respond to a request for comment on Thursday.

The Journal’s editorial page found common ground with Mr. Trump throughout his presidency, and several of its prominent writers resigned in protest against what they saw as a betrayal of the page’s conservative values. (A defector, Bret Stephens, is now an opinion columnist for the New York Times.)

The page has also regularly harassed the Liberals. Last month, an uproar arose after the Journal ran an opinion piece claiming that Mr. Biden’s wife, Jill Biden, should ditch “Dr.” honorary. of her name because she holds a doctorate in education and not a medical degree.

Even in his conviction against Mr Trump, which was due to be published in Friday’s print edition, Mr Gigot and his staff took the time to slam Democrats for impeaching the president last year for this. that the newspaper considered as simple crimes of “helping hand”. the party had “abused the process”.

But this week’s events in Washington, the newspaper writes, have shown that Mr. Trump “has refused to accept the basic bargain of democracy, which is to accept the outcome, win or lose.”

“The best case for impeachment is not to punish Mr. Trump,” the newspaper wrote. “It is to send a message to future presidents that Congress will protect itself against populists of all ideological stripes wishing to agitate a crowd.”

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The Wall Street Journal editorial board urges Trump to step down to avoid a second indictment.

The editorial board of the Wall Street Journal, the flagship of Rupert Murdoch’s newspaper empire, on Thursday denounced President Trump for inciting a crowd of his supporters to storm the United States Capitol, declaring his behavior “ungodly. And urging Mr. Trump to step down from office to prevent a second impeachment by the Democratic-controlled House.

In an unsigned article titled “Donald The Last Days of Trump, ”the Journal’s editorial page – an indicator of the conservative establishment – excoriated the president for“ an assault on the constitutional process of transfer of power after an election ”and said that“ this week he probably ended up as a serious political figure. “

“If Mr. Trump is to avoid a second indictment, his best course would be to take personal responsibility and resign,” the Journal wrote, concluding: “It’s better for everyone, including himself, if he leaves quietly.

The Journal’s editorial page, run by editor Paul Gigot, has criticized Mr. Trump in the past, sometimes harshly. But his latest salvo was a stark repudiation of the president by a media outlet controlled by Mr. Murdoch, whose cable network Fox News is home to several of Mr. Trump’s most loyal and long-standing media advocates.

Mr Murdoch’s publicists had previously indicated he did not expect Mr Trump to resume the presidency, and another Murdoch publication, The New York Post, proclaimed President-elect Joseph R. Biden’s victory. Jr. even though Mr. Trump refused to do so. accept the results.

The Post, in its own unsigned editorial on Thursday, paused before arguing that Mr. Trump should leave the White House prematurely, urging his aides to “stay and stop the madmen” instead. But given Mr. Murdoch’s influence over the political opinions of his publications, the Journal’s candid words for Mr. Trump – which once demanded Mr. Murdoch’s approval – indicate that the mogul is now looking to the beginning of Biden’s presidency.

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2 Cleveland Police Officers Avoid Federal Charges For Tamir Rice Murder

Two Cleveland police officers will avoid federal criminal charges for their role in the murder of Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old black boy who carried a pellet gun when he was shot in 2014, the Department of Justice said on Tuesday, citing a lack of evidence in the high-profile case.

The announcement ended a five-year federal investigation into the actions of then-officer Timothy Loehmann and his partner Officer Frank Garmback, an investigation that was criticized by Tamir’s family and the government watchdogs as being deeply flawed and politically influenced.

Tamir’s murder became a catalyst for national judgment on police brutality and racial injustice, but the federal investigation languished under the Obama and Trump administrations. In 2019, two career prosecutors in the Department of Justice’s civil rights division were refused permission to use a grand jury to issue subpoenas for documents or testimony.

Justice Ministry officials said in a lengthy statement on Tuesday that they could not establish that the officers involved in Tamir’s murder willfully violated his civil rights or knowingly made false statements with intent. obstruct a federal investigation.

“This high legal standard – one of the highest standards of intent imposed by law – requires proof that the officer acted with specific intent to do something the law prohibits,” the ministry said. of Justice. “It is not enough to show that the officer erred, acted negligently, acted by accident or mistake, or even exercised poor judgment.”

The result of the extended review of the case angered the Rice family, who sued Cleveland over Tamir’s death. The city settled the case for $ 6 million in 2016, and Officer Loehmann was later fired for an unrelated violation.

“It was patently disrespectful that I had to learn from the media that the Justice Department closed the investigation, after career prosecutors recommended a grand jury be called,” Tamir’s mother Samaria Rice said on Tuesday. .

On November 22, 2014, Tamir was playing with a replica of a Colt pistol, posing with the realistic airsoft style pistol, which fired plastic pellets, at a local park when officers responded to a 911 call reporting someone with a gun. What the city’s multilayered 911 system failed to convey is that the appellant said the gun was “probably fake” and the person carrying it was “probably a minor”.

Mr. Loehmann, a rookie officer, shot Tamir in the abdomen at point blank range within two seconds of his patrol car arriving.

At the end of October, The New York Times reported that the Justice Department had quietly canceled its investigation into Tamir’s murder.

The Justice Department said on Tuesday it had analyzed surveillance video from a nearby recreation center, but the footage was grainy and failed to shed light on what had happened within seconds. preceded Tamir’s death.

“Although Tamir Rice’s death is tragic, the evidence does not meet these substantial evidentiary requirements,” the Justice Department said.

Subodh Chandra, a former federal prosecutor who represents the Rice family, said Tuesday the process had been tainted. “The Rice family has once again been deceived by a fair process,” Mr. Chandra said in an email.

Mr Chandra said the Justice Department ignored the Rice family’s request to report on the department’s internal discussions on the case and to make public the recommendations of the two prosecutors who sought permission to use a grand jury.

In 2015, a Cuyahoga County grand jury decided not to charge Constable Loehmann with a felony under state law. The decision, based on a recommendation from the county prosecutor, sparked protests.

Henry Hilow, an attorney with the Cleveland Police Patrolmen’s Association who represented the two officers involved in the case, said Tuesday’s announcement by the Department of Justice was yet another assertion of the facts of the case.

“I agree with the Justice Department’s decision,” Hilow said in a voicemail message Tuesday night. “This is in line with the findings of the investigation by the Cuyahoga County District Attorney’s Office and all independent investigations.”

In 2017, Mr Loehmann was fired for lying about his job application in 2013, a violation that only came to light after authorities began investigating the police after Tamir’s death.

A spokeswoman for the Cleveland Police Division declined to comment on Tuesday evening.

In August, a lawyer for a government watchdog filed a whistleblower complaint with Justice Department Inspector General Michael E. Horowitz, accusing the department of mismanaging the case.

Lawyer David Z. Seide of the Government Accountability Project, who represents someone familiar with the case, said in an interview on Tuesday evening that the Justice Department’s investigation had grown so long that the statute of limitations for bringing charges of civil rights or obstruction. against officers had already expired.

“The tragedy of this case was that there was political interference which prevented the case from being investigated,” Seide said.

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Video: Senate approves bill to avoid shutdown

TimesVideoSenate Approves Bill to Avoid Closure Congress is still divided over a stimulus deal, but on Friday, senators voted to avoid the shutdown with a week-long interim bill.